“OpenOffice.org” free Office suite for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or IRIX

Discussion in 'Javascript' started by GoodieMan, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. GoodieMan

    GoodieMan Guest

    Hurrah!!! Here is an absolutely free Office Suite Program
    “OpenOffice.org” which is more powerful than any expensive MS Office
    Suite. The Suite is free for any environment. You can run it on any
    platform i.e. Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or
    IRIX. The software needs no any licensing or having any restriction.
    Download for your office or home and save a lot of money.

    Download “OpenOffice.org”

    http://freeware4.blogspot.com/2008/04/openofficeorg-suite-free-alternate-for..html
     
    GoodieMan, Apr 18, 2008
    #1
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  2. Re: “OpenOffice.org†free Office suite for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or IRIX

    GoodieMan wrote:
    > Hurrah!!! Here is an absolutely free Office Suite Program
    > “OpenOffice.org†which is more powerful than any expensive MS Office
    > Suite


    Good morning. OpenOffice.org has been around for years already.

    > [...]
    > Download “OpenOffice.orgâ€
    >
    > [...]


    The correct URL is http://www.openoffice.org/ of course.

    This does not have anything to do with scripting; stop posting off-topic.


    F'up2 poster

    PointedEars
    --
    var bugRiddenCrashPronePieceOfJunk = (
    navigator.userAgent.indexOf('MSIE 5') != -1
    && navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Mac') != -1
    ) // Plone, register_function.js:16
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Apr 18, 2008
    #2
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  3. GoodieMan

    Rik Wasmus Guest

    Re: “OpenOffice.org†free Office suite for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or IRIX

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2008 10:39:46 +0200, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn
    <> wrote:

    > GoodieMan wrote:
    >> Hurrah!!! Here is an absolutely free Office Suite Program
    >> “OpenOffice.org†which is more powerful than any expensive MS Office
    >> Suite

    >
    > Good morning. OpenOffice.org has been around for years already.


    Indeed, and 'more powerfull' is in the eye of the beholder (however
    sufficient for most peoples need).

    > F'up2 poster


    'poster' in this case would be you in my nttp client :p
    --
    Rik Wasmus
     
    Rik Wasmus, Apr 18, 2008
    #3
  4. On Apr 18, 2:48 am, GoodieMan <> wrote:
    > Hurrah!!! Here is an absolutely free Office Suite Program
    > “OpenOffice.org” which is more powerful than any expensive MS Office
    > Suite. The Suite is free for any environment. You can run it on any
    > platform i.e. Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or
    > IRIX. The software needs no any licensing or having any restriction.
    > Download for your office or home and save a lot of money.
    >
    > Download “OpenOffice.org”
    >
    > http://freeware4.blogspot.com/2008/04/openofficeorg-suite-free-altern...




    It's soooooooo slow booting up, each time it is first run...probably
    because of running that Java thinggy first...is Java still a big deal
    in web development? I think JavaScript is all over the place now --
    almost everyone has "rollover" buttons, at least...but Java, I don't
    like how long it takes to load the interpreter or whatever it is that
    takes so long -- and within the browser, the browser freezes up so I
    can't do anything for like a whole minute (I think it's better
    nowadays, but I remember like two years ago I hated Java-sites,
    especially those that ran it automatically "onLoad"...).
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 18, 2008
    #4
  5. GoodieMan

    Erwin Moller Guest

    Prisoner at War schreef:
    > On Apr 18, 2:48 am, GoodieMan <> wrote:
    >> Hurrah!!! Here is an absolutely free Office Suite Program
    >> “OpenOffice.org” which is more powerful than any expensive MS Office
    >> Suite. The Suite is free for any environment. You can run it on any
    >> platform i.e. Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or
    >> IRIX. The software needs no any licensing or having any restriction.
    >> Download for your office or home and save a lot of money.
    >>
    >> Download “OpenOffice.org”
    >>
    >> http://freeware4.blogspot.com/2008/04/openofficeorg-suite-free-altern...

    >
    >
    >
    > It's soooooooo slow booting up, each time it is first run...probably
    > because of running that Java thinggy first...is Java still a big deal
    > in web development?


    Yes, but its real force is serverside these days.

    But Java applets are also still very capable.
    Try to open a socket to some place using JavaScript. ;-)

    I think JavaScript is all over the place now --
    > almost everyone has "rollover" buttons, at least...but Java, I don't
    > like how long it takes to load the interpreter or whatever it is that
    > takes so long -- and within the browser, the browser freezes up so I
    > can't do anything for like a whole minute (I think it's better
    > nowadays, but I remember like two years ago I hated Java-sites,
    > especially those that ran it automatically "onLoad"...).


    If you compare java to JavaScript, you just don't know what you are
    talking about.
    "Rollover buttons" LOL!

    Erwin
     
    Erwin Moller, Apr 18, 2008
    #5
  6. GoodieMan

    CK Guest

    Words to the wise, Prisoner at War <> wrote:

    >On Apr 18, 2:48 am, GoodieMan <> wrote:
    >> Hurrah!!! Here is an absolutely free Office Suite Program
    >> “OpenOffice.org” which is more powerful than any expensive MS Office
    >> Suite. The Suite is free for any environment. You can run it on any
    >> platform i.e. Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or
    >> IRIX. The software needs no any licensing or having any restriction.
    >> Download for your office or home and save a lot of money.
    >>
    >> Download “OpenOffice.org”
    >>
    >> http://freeware4.blogspot.com/2008/04/openofficeorg-suite-free-altern...

    >
    >
    >
    >It's soooooooo slow booting up, each time it is first run...probably
    >because of running that Java thinggy first...


    Thats weird, OpenOffice is written in C++.

    >is Java still a big deal in web development?


    No, amazon.com and ebay.com are no big deals.

    >I think JavaScript is all over the place now --
    >almost everyone has "rollover" buttons, at least...


    Whatever you need Javascript for that, when simple css can do.

    >but Java, I don't
    >like how long it takes to load the interpreter or whatever it is that
    >takes so long -- and within the browser, the browser freezes up so I
    >can't do anything for like a whole minute (I think it's better
    >nowadays, but I remember like two years ago I hated Java-sites,
    >especially those that ran it automatically "onLoad"...).


    If you are talking about applets, well, they have their niches,
    however small.
    The power that is means servlets, though.
    --
    Claus Dragon <>
    =(UDIC)=
    d++ e++ T--
    K1!2!3!456!7!S a29
    "Coffee is a mocker. So, I am going to mock."

    - Me, lately.
     
    CK, Apr 18, 2008
    #6
  7. GoodieMan

    The Magpie Guest

    GoodieMan wrote:
    > Hurrah!!! Here is an absolutely free Office Suite Program
    > “OpenOffice.org” which is more powerful than any expensive MS Office
    > Suite.
    >

    Welcome to the real world. Its been around - and been on all my
    various PCs - for years. Its even responsive these days, thanks to the
    Microsoft Office style "Quicklauncher".
     
    The Magpie, Apr 18, 2008
    #7
  8. On Apr 18, 10:44 am, Erwin Moller
    <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Yes, but its real force is serverside these days.


    Yeah, I was getting that feeling! Thanks for the confirmation. But
    then again, there are so many server languages...I'm surprised Java's
    held on. Why so many languages if they all do the same thing??

    > But Java applets are also still very capable.
    > Try to open a socket to some place using JavaScript. ;-)


    LOL, I just got over timing image swaps!

    > If you compare java to JavaScript, you just don't know what you are
    > talking about.


    I know they're different "technologies," but they're similar in this
    one little respect: they're both supposed to make the web more
    "interactive" but while Java's vastly more powerful I as a layman
    haven't seen anything besides games and educational applets.

    > "Rollover buttons" LOL!


    Actually, I get that same ticklish feeling whenever a JavaScript text
    gushes over rollovers like it's a big deal.

    > Erwin
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 19, 2008
    #8
  9. On Apr 18, 1:29 pm, CK <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Thats weird, OpenOffice is written in C++.


    LOL, I guess Java really is very close to C++!! (Or C+, or C#, or C-
    whatever!)

    > No, amazon.com and ebay.com are no big deals.


    Well, that's interesting...it doesn't take forever for their sites to
    load up, whereas sites like my bank used to take a whole minute to
    load just 'cause it was running some Java stock ticker or other and
    had to load up the Virtual Machine or something first....

    > Whatever you need Javascript for that, when simple css can do.


    Yes, true. I was just thinking of one of the very first uses of
    JavaScript...I had actually tinkered around with it back in '98, when
    it was 1.1 or 1.2 -- then left the web and "computer programming lite"
    for ten years...until last month!! I was never a computer programmer
    to begin with -- though I did get a "B" in Turbo Pascal back in
    college in '92-ish -- and a ten-year hiatus has left me very much in
    the dark about these things!

    > If you are talking about applets, well, they have their niches,
    > however small.


    Yes, applets, and some sites had the bad habit of running applets
    onLoad...I'd enter the URL and my browser or whole computer (IIRC)
    would be frozen for the next minute....

    > The power that is means servlets, though.


    Ugh -- more stuff-I-never-heard-of!

    > --
    > Claus Dragon <>
    > =(UDIC)=
    > d++ e++ T--
    > K1!2!3!456!7!S a29
    > "Coffee is a mocker. So, I am going to mock."
    >
    > - Me, lately.
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 19, 2008
    #9
  10. Re: “OpenOffice.org†free Officesuite for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or IRIX

    Prisoner at War <> writes:

    > On Apr 18, 10:44 am, Erwin Moller
    > <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Yes, but its real force is serverside these days.

    >
    > Yeah, I was getting that feeling! Thanks for the confirmation. But
    > then again, there are so many server languages...I'm surprised Java's
    > held on. Why so many languages if they all do the same thing??


    *gross simplification*: java was explicitely designed to appeal to C++ and
    C programmers (a large set of the professional application and systems
    programmers at the time), and it was backed by a very large company.

    Also, languages are not at all the same, and many languages don't have
    the same "target". Javascript for instance was initially designed to be
    an extension language for the netscape web browser, where IIRC Java was
    designed to be used for embedded systems and application
    programming. Java was certainly not designed from the outset to be one
    of the big server-side languages of the web (the web hardly existed at
    the time).

    >> If you compare java to JavaScript, you just don't know what you are
    >> talking about.

    >
    > I know they're different "technologies," but they're similar in this
    > one little respect: they're both supposed to make the web more
    > "interactive" but while Java's vastly more powerful I as a layman
    > haven't seen anything besides games and educational applets.


    Java is vastly more powerful than javascript, but javascript is much
    more light-weight, easier to implement, far more widely supported and
    easier to secure than java applets. And, as I implied above, Java really
    wasn't designed for applets.

    --
    Joost Diepenmaat | blog: http://joost.zeekat.nl/ | work: http://zeekat.nl/
     
    Joost Diepenmaat, Apr 19, 2008
    #10
  11. Re: “OpenOffice.org†free Officesuite for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or IRIX

    Joost Diepenmaat <> writes:
    > Java is vastly more powerful than javascript, but ...


    Just to correct myself; this isn't really true if you look at the
    languages by themselves. You can definitely make the case that
    Javascript is more powerful than java (and I would make that case), but
    as far as "client-side" programming goes, java does have an edge, just
    because it has a much larger set of library routines which includes
    stuff that's just not possible to do in today's browser-based javascript
    (sockets, as someone mentioned here, are just one example).

    --
    Joost Diepenmaat | blog: http://joost.zeekat.nl/ | work: http://zeekat.nl/
     
    Joost Diepenmaat, Apr 19, 2008
    #11
  12. On Apr 19, 2:38 pm, Joost Diepenmaat <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > *gross simplification*:


    True, but I don't want to issue giant legal disclaimers every time I
    post!

    > java was explicitely designed to appeal to C++ and
    > C programmers (a large set of the professional application and systems
    > programmers at the time), and it was backed by a very large company.
    >
    > Also, languages are not at all the same, and many languages don't have
    > the same "target". Javascript for instance was initially designed to be
    > an extension language for the netscape web browser, where IIRC Java was
    > designed to be used for embedded systems and application
    > programming. Java was certainly not designed from the outset to be one
    > of the big server-side languages of the web (the web hardly existed at
    > the time).


    Yes, I actually did read about the history of Java (the co-author of
    one of my old ~1998 JavaSCript books was on the "Oak" team at Sun),
    but what I'd meant by my question was, why so many server languages?
    Like how there's "only" one "browser language," which is JavaScript
    (MS' JScript and VBScript notwithstanding -- I see them as just
    "business products" for MS to try to get more market share, etc.).

    > Java is vastly more powerful than javascript, but javascript is much
    > more light-weight, easier to implement, far more widely supported and
    > easier to secure than java applets. And, as I implied above, Java really
    > wasn't designed for applets.


    So basically ease-of-use is why Java's "disappeared" server-side?
    That makes sense to me -- but of course, I'm having difficulty with
    the simplest JavaScript! So far everything's been resolved, in time,
    but I wish I had a better, quicker mind for this....

    > --
    > Joost Diepenmaat | blog:http://joost.zeekat.nl/| work:http://zeekat.nl/
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 20, 2008
    #12
  13. On Apr 19, 3:15 pm, Joost Diepenmaat <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Just to correct myself; this isn't really true if you look at the
    > languages by themselves. You can definitely make the case that
    > Javascript is more powerful than java (and I would make that case),


    WHOA!!

    Now I never heard that before!!

    Not to get into a programmers' rugby scrum over favorite languages
    here, but how's JavaScript "more powerful" than Java???

    Just a hyperlink or something is fine, thank you....

    > but
    > as far as "client-side" programming goes, java does have an edge, just
    > because it has a much larger set of library routines which includes
    > stuff that's just not possible to do in today's browser-based javascript
    > (sockets, as someone mentioned here, are just one example).


    Okay, I don't even know what a socket is...I'll go look that up....

    > --
    > Joost Diepenmaat | blog:http://joost.zeekat.nl/| work:http://zeekat.nl/
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 20, 2008
    #13
  14. Re:Re: “OpenOffice.org” free Office suite for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or IRIX

    Prisoner at War <> writes:

    > Not to get into a programmers' rugby scrum over favorite languages
    > here, but how's JavaScript "more powerful" than Java???


    How do you measure "power" of a programming language at all?

    There is "computational power", but both are Turing-complete, so that's
    moot.

    There is "expressive power": How easy do you express what you mean?
    I.e., how short, but still readable, can you express the solution
    to a problem.
    I can't say which one wins here. Closures in Javascript and classes in
    Java are both good at this. The greater standard library of Java
    increases the expressive power whe dealing with non-trivial
    algorithms, by introducing more "primitives", but Java is more verbose
    too.

    Any other powers? :)
    /L
    --
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
     
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen, Apr 21, 2008
    #14
  15. Re:Re: “OpenOffice.org” free Office suite for Microsoft Windows, Linux, Solaris, BSD, OpenVMS, OS/2 or IRIX

    Prisoner at War <> writes:

    > but what I'd meant by my question was, why so many server languages?
    > Like how there's "only" one "browser language," which is JavaScript


    Basically because the installed base of browsers decide which features
    pages can use. Javascript does the job adequately, so there is no niche
    for another page scripting language to start out in. No niche means no
    reason to use any other language when Javascript is already there.

    On the server, you can pick a technology per solution.

    /L
    --
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
     
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen, Apr 21, 2008
    #15
  16. GoodieMan

    RobG Guest

    On Apr 19, 12:10 am, Prisoner at War <>
    wrote:
    [...]
    > ...is Java still a big deal
    > in web development? I think JavaScript is all over the place now --
    > almost everyone has "rollover" buttons, at least...


    Rollovers do not indicate the presence of javascript - CSS has been
    used to implement them for years.


    --
    Rob
     
    RobG, Apr 21, 2008
    #16
  17. GoodieMan

    Erwin Moller Guest

    Prisoner at War schreef:

    <snip>

    >> Java is vastly more powerful than javascript, but javascript is much
    >> more light-weight, easier to implement, far more widely supported and
    >> easier to secure than java applets. And, as I implied above, Java really
    >> wasn't designed for applets.

    >
    > So basically ease-of-use is why Java's "disappeared" server-side?


    You mean clientside here I think, right?
    Java is still going strong on the server. :)
    And yes, applets are disappearing clientside, probably partly because
    JavaScript grew strong in the last years, and partly because JavaScript
    is easy to learn compared to Java.
    (I must add that 'mastering' JavaScript is another story, but doing
    simple things like formvalidation, image manipulation, etc are easy to
    learn.)


    Regards,
    Erwin Moller

    > That makes sense to me -- but of course, I'm having difficulty with
    > the simplest JavaScript! So far everything's been resolved, in time,
    > but I wish I had a better, quicker mind for this....
    >
    >> --
    >> Joost Diepenmaat | blog:http://joost.zeekat.nl/| work:http://zeekat.nl/

    >
     
    Erwin Moller, Apr 21, 2008
    #17
  18. On Apr 20, 11:18 pm, RobG <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Rollovers do not indicate the presence of javascript - CSS has been
    > used to implement them for years.


    You're right -- and I only just found out the other day, after I'd
    made my post!

    Boy, I'm still catching up with, like, 2006 or something....

    > --
    > Rob
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 21, 2008
    #18
  19. On Apr 20, 10:01 pm, Lasse Reichstein Nielsen <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > How do you measure "power" of a programming language at all?


    I dunno -- I was asking him! My outsider's perspective would judge it
    by the scope and depth of what it could do...thus, though you can use
    JavaScript to even program an adventure game, it would be nothing like
    the kind of game available with, it seems, Python!

    > There is "computational power", but both are Turing-complete, so that's
    > moot.


    "Turing-complete"?? Wow, more stuff to learn...I am eagerly awaiting
    my book "How Computer Programming Works"...I hope that it covers such
    deep matters, even though the book is full of colorful pictures for a
    newbie like me!

    > There is "expressive power": How easy do you express what you mean?


    Hmmm, true...that's why in that other thread on this NG I thought that
    even though document.imageID.src="file.format" is strictly correct
    JavaScript, it's much more user-friendly and, now, I guess, more
    "expressively powerful" than
    document.getElementByID("imageID").src="file.format"....

    > I.e., how short, but still readable, can you express the solution
    > to a problem.
    > I can't say which one wins here. Closures in Javascript and classes in
    > Java are both good at this. The greater standard library of Java
    > increases the expressive power whe dealing with non-trivial
    > algorithms, by introducing more "primitives", but Java is more verbose
    > too.


    Me, as a simple "non-technical" user, I like JavaScript 'cause it's
    "invisible"...Java freezes up my browser (maybe it doesn't do this
    anymore; I haven't visited any "Java-sites" that I know of lately) for
    half a minute or so, and seems to run in little windows on the
    page....

    > Any other powers? :)


    Keine Ahnung -- was wondering just so myself!

    > /L
    > --
    > Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    > DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    > 'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 21, 2008
    #19
  20. On Apr 20, 10:06 pm, Lasse Reichstein Nielsen <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Basically because the installed base of browsers decide which features
    > pages can use. Javascript does the job adequately, so there is no niche
    > for another page scripting language to start out in. No niche means no
    > reason to use any other language when Javascript is already there.
    >
    > On the server, you can pick a technology per solution.


    Hmm!!

    So it's like one language per solution in the server world??

    Like using French to order food, but English to program, and Chinese
    to curse!! ;-)

    Okay, I can kind of see using MySQL for database programming (whatever
    that is), but there's PHP and Perl and Java and C++ (or C# or C-
    whatever) and Python and who knows what else...not sure why a server
    language can't be "versatile" and "universal" as opposed to
    "specialized" and "optimized for particular problem sets"....

    > /L
    > --
    > Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    > DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    > 'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
     
    Prisoner at War, Apr 21, 2008
    #20
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