2 Questions:

Discussion in 'C++' started by john, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. john

    john Guest

    1) I am considering whether to dedicate a considerable amount of time
    to learning C++. If anybody has insights into what attributes and
    skills are neccesary to become moderately proficient in C++, I would
    be grateful.


    2) I have got a book to help me learn C++ with, Sams "Teach yourself
    C++ in 21 days" (AS IF!) by Jessie Liberty. If anybody is familiar
    with this text and C++, I wonder if they could let me know whether
    they thought it was any good.

    John
    john, Jan 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. On 24 Jan 2004 12:40:36 -0800, (john) wrote:

    >1) I am considering whether to dedicate a considerable amount of time
    >to learning C++. If anybody has insights into what attributes and
    >skills are neccesary to become moderately proficient in C++, I would
    >be grateful.


    That's a goobledegook "manager-wannabe-question". It's meaningless,
    sort of "what is the best strategy for adding 2 and 2?", only instead of
    right out saying the problem is "2+2" some nonsense generalization is
    used. The only way to find out if you have what it takes is to try.



    >2) I have got a book to help me learn C++ with, Sams "Teach yourself
    >C++ in 21 days" (AS IF!) by Jessie Liberty. If anybody is familiar
    >with this text and C++, I wonder if they could let me know whether
    >they thought it was any good.


    Reportedly it's absolutely not a good a book.

    However, Jessie Liberty himself has maintained in this newsgroup that
    most of the most glaring errors and omissions have been corrected in
    the latest edition(s) -- that may or may not be correct...

    Generally, if you already know one other programming language, the
    recommended book is "Accelerated C++".
    Alf P. Steinbach, Jan 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. "john" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > 1) I am considering whether to dedicate a considerable amount of

    time
    > to learning C++. If anybody has insights into what attributes and
    > skills are neccesary to become moderately proficient in C++, I would
    > be grateful.
    >


    I believe anyone (of average intelligence) should be able to become
    moderately proficient in C++. People with a special aptitude for
    technical matters have a bit of an advantage. Certainly if you are
    moderately proficient in any other programming language, you should be
    able to become moderately proficient in C++.

    >
    > 2) I have got a book to help me learn C++ with, Sams "Teach yourself
    > C++ in 21 days" (AS IF!) by Jessie Liberty. If anybody is familiar
    > with this text and C++, I wonder if they could let me know whether
    > they thought it was any good.
    >


    I'm a bit embarrassed to say so, but I believe I read book with that
    title a couple of years ago. From the title, you might think it would
    be garbage, but I think it actually wasn't too bad. I wouldn't
    recommend spending a lot of time on it, but it probably wouldn't hurt
    to read through it quickly (if you are able) to get a quick overview
    of the language. For a solid foundation, the following are considered
    excellent:

    Accelerated C++ (Koenig & Moo)
    The C++ Primer, 3rd Ed. Lojoie and Lippman (*not* Prata)
    The C++ Programming Language, 3rd. or special editions
    (Stroustrup)

    Jonathan
    Jonathan Turkanis, Jan 24, 2004
    #3
  4. john wrote:
    > 1) I am considering whether to dedicate a considerable amount of time
    > to learning C++. If anybody has insights into what attributes and
    > skills are neccesary to become moderately proficient in C++, I would
    > be grateful.


    Be aware that progrmming requires more than just knowing a language.
    There are data structures, recursive algorithms, iterative algorithms,
    design patterns, object-oriented approach, numerical analysis,
    encapsulation and coupling to name a few. Know a language is the
    foundation and the place to start.

    You will need some knowledge of the target requirements. For example,
    if you are writing a loan application, you will need to know about
    processing loans. If you are writing a program to control air valves
    then you will need to know some electronics, mechanics and control
    theory. Be propared to make a deep investment in knowledge.


    --
    Thomas Matthews

    C++ newsgroup welcome message:
    http://www.slack.net/~shiva/welcome.txt
    C++ Faq: http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite
    C Faq: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/c-faq/top.html
    alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++ faq:
    http://www.raos.demon.uk/acllc-c /faq.html
    Other sites:
    http://www.josuttis.com -- C++ STL Library book
    http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl -- Standard Template Library
    Thomas Matthews, Jan 25, 2004
    #4
  5. john

    Mike Wahler Guest

    "Thomas Matthews" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > john wrote:
    > > 1) I am considering whether to dedicate a considerable amount of time
    > > to learning C++. If anybody has insights into what attributes and
    > > skills are neccesary to become moderately proficient in C++, I would
    > > be grateful.

    >
    > Be aware that progrmming requires more than just knowing a language.
    > There are data structures, recursive algorithms, iterative algorithms,
    > design patterns, object-oriented approach, numerical analysis,
    > encapsulation and coupling to name a few. Know a language is the
    > foundation and the place to start.


    A language is important, yes. But I think more fundamental is
    problem solving skills. One problem that is constantly needing
    a solution is the location of needed information.

    > You will need some knowledge of the target requirements. For example,
    > if you are writing a loan application, you will need to know about
    > processing loans. If you are writing a program to control air valves
    > then you will need to know some electronics, mechanics and control
    > theory. Be propared to make a deep investment in knowledge.


    Exactly. As I tell folks constantly, if you can't do something yourself,
    you have no hope of telling a computer (by writing a program) how to do it.

    -Mike
    Mike Wahler, Jan 26, 2004
    #5
  6. john

    Jon Bell Guest

    In article <>,
    john <> wrote:
    >1) I am considering whether to dedicate a considerable amount of time
    >to learning C++. If anybody has insights into what attributes and
    >skills are neccesary to become moderately proficient in C++, I would
    >be grateful.


    Do you have any programming experience in some other language, or are you
    learning to program from scratch, as well as learning C++? It makes a
    difference in the resources that people are likely to recommend to you.

    As far as general skills are concerned, I would say that in order to
    become a good programmer, you need to have good organization skills. One
    of the best students I've ever had was actually an English major! He knew
    how to organize his thoughts and write effective expository prose, and he
    was able to carry that over into organizing his programs logically.

    Also, you need to have a good eye for detail. In written English, we can
    tolerate minor grammatical slipups or mislaid punctuation, but a C++
    compiler (or any other language's compiler, for that matter) does not
    forgive things like missing semicolons or unbalanced parentheses.

    --
    Jon Bell <> Presbyterian College
    Dept. of Physics and Computer Science Clinton, South Carolina USA
    Jon Bell, Jan 26, 2004
    #6
  7. [snip]

    >
    > 2) I have got a book to help me learn C++ with, Sams "Teach yourself
    > C++ in 21 days" (AS IF!) by Jessie Liberty. If anybody is familiar
    > with this text and C++, I wonder if they could let me know whether
    > they thought it was any good.


    For a newbie, I recommend the book "C++ Primer Plus (4th Edition) by Stephen
    Prata". (Don't confuse it with the other book "C++ Primer by Lipman")

    --The Directive

    > John





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    The Directive, Jan 28, 2004
    #7
  8. "The Directive" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > [snip]
    >


    >
    > For a newbie, I recommend the book "C++ Primer Plus (4th Edition) by

    Stephen
    > Prata". (Don't confuse it with the other book "C++ Primer by

    Lipman")
    >


    I agree with the parenthetical remark.

    Jonathan
    Jonathan Turkanis, Jan 28, 2004
    #8
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