a very bad question

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by leo.hou@gmail.com, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to pronounce
    "~" and "#" in English
    , Feb 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. Larry Guest

    wrote:
    > Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to

    pronounce
    > "~" and "#" in English


    Tilde and Pound sir.
    Larry, Feb 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. Tintin Guest

    Re:[OT] a very bad question

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to pronounce
    > "~" and "#" in English


    Depends which variance of English you mean.

    For some people, it's:

    ~ = tilde
    # = hash
    Tintin, Feb 3, 2005
    #3
  4. Peter Wyzl Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    : Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to pronounce
    : "~" and "#" in English

    ~ is spelt tilde but pronounced tild or tilled

    # is called either pound or hash depending whether you speak US English
    (pound) or UK/Australian English (hash)

    P
    --
    print "Just another Perl Hacker";
    Peter Wyzl, Feb 3, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    wrote:
    > Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to
    > pronounce "~" and "#" in English


    Larry <> wrote:
    > Tilde and Pound sir.


    Ah. You must be using American English.

    In English English it's "tilde" and (usually) "hash", respectively.

    However, I've also heard "#" being described as "square" and even
    "octothorpe". There's a FAQ somewhere on one of the UK newsgroups about
    this.

    The noun "pound" is never used for "#" as this word is used[*] for our
    currency symbol and an (obsolete) imperial weight measurement.

    Ob Perl:
    print "UK currency symbol is \x{A3}\n"; # U+00A3 POUND SIGN

    Chris

    [*] Actually there are other uses of the noun "pound" but none is for
    describing the symbol "#".
    , Feb 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Paul Lalli Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to pronounce
    > "~" and "#" in English


    In addition to the other responses, you should be aware that some people
    refer to '#' as a 'number sign'.

    Paul Lalli
    Paul Lalli, Feb 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Guest

    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know
    > > how to pronounce "~" and "#" in English


    Paul Lalli wrote:
    >
    > In addition to the other responses, you should be aware
    > that some people refer to '#' as a 'number sign'.



    Although it's fairly rare, some people will even refer to '#' as the
    "tic-tac-toe" sign. (Tic-tac-toe is a simple game played with X's and
    O's.)

    -- Jean-Luc
    , Feb 3, 2005
    #7
  8. phaylon Guest

    Wondering wrote:

    > Wow. I've read the replies, and not one gives the truly correct name for
    > this symbol "#"
    >
    > It's an octothorpe


    Try again: <>


    p

    --
    http://www.dunkelheit.at/
    Thru the darkness of futures past, the magician longs to see.
    One chants out between two worlds: Fire, walk with me.
    -- Twin Peaks, »Bob«
    phaylon, Feb 3, 2005
    #8
  9. Wondering Guest

    Wow. I've read the replies, and not one gives the truly correct name
    for this symbol "#"

    It's an octothorpe - though most people use the more generally
    understood terms included in the other posts.

    Other symbols typically not reffered to by their correct names -
    / Virgule
    \ Anti-virgule

    I thought there were more compulsive folks reading this group.
    Wondering, Feb 3, 2005
    #9
  10. Anno Siegel Guest

    Wondering <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > Wow. I've read the replies, and not one gives the truly correct name
    > for this symbol "#"
    >
    > It's an octothorpe - though most people use the more generally
    > understood terms included in the other posts.


    That statement only shows that you don't know what you are talking about.

    The "truly correct name" for # has been discussed on Usenet hundreds of
    times. The result is invariably that there is none.

    Here is what the alt.usage.english FAQ has to say about "octothorpe":

    Finally, in a failed attempt to avoid the naming problem by
    creating a new name, the term "octothorp(e)" (which MWCD10 dates
    1971) was invented for "#", allegedly by Bell Labs engineers when.

    Anno
    Anno Siegel, Feb 3, 2005
    #10
  11. Anno Siegel Guest

    Wondering <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > Wow. I've read the replies, and not one gives the truly correct name
    > for this symbol "#"
    >
    > It's an octothorpe - though most people use the more generally
    > understood terms included in the other posts.


    That statement only shows that you don't know what you are talking about.

    The "truly correct name" for # has been discussed on Usenet hundreds of
    times. The result is invariably that there is none.

    Here is what the alt.usage.english FAQ has to say about "octothorpe":

    Finally, in a failed attempt to avoid the naming problem by
    creating a new name, the term "octothorp(e)" (which MWCD10 dates
    1971) was invented for "#", allegedly by Bell Labs engineers when...

    Anno
    Anno Siegel, Feb 3, 2005
    #11
  12. Scott Bryce Guest

    Paul Lalli wrote:

    > In addition to the other responses, you should be aware that some people
    > refer to '#' as a 'number sign'.


    or "sharp."
    Scott Bryce, Feb 3, 2005
    #12
  13. Scott Bryce wrote:

    > Paul Lalli wrote:
    >
    >> In addition to the other responses, you should be aware that some people
    >> refer to '#' as a 'number sign'.

    >
    > or "sharp."


    Actually, in spite of what Microsoft would have you believe, a musical
    sharp sign, although very similar in appearance to hash/pound/octothorpe,
    is in fact different. If you'll look at Unicode UTF-8, you will discover
    that the musical sharp sign is code 0x266f.

    --
    Christopher Mattern

    "Which one you figure tracked us?"
    "The ugly one, sir."
    "...Could you be more specific?"
    Chris Mattern, Feb 3, 2005
    #13
  14. Guest

    Chris Mattern wrote:
    > Scott Bryce wrote:
    >
    > > Paul Lalli wrote:
    > >
    > >> In addition to the other responses, you should be aware that some

    people
    > >> refer to '#' as a 'number sign'.

    > >
    > > or "sharp."

    >
    > Actually, in spite of what Microsoft would have you believe,


    You misspelled "ANSI" as "Microsoft" there. ANSI decided that
    computers would know #.

    > a musical sharp sign,


    Who said "musical sharp sign"? Scott said some people call # a sharp,
    and so they do.

    > although very similar in appearance to hash/pound/octothorpe,
    > is in fact different. If you'll look at Unicode UTF-8, you will

    discover
    > that the musical sharp sign is code 0x266f.


    Unicode doesn't dictate English pronunciation of ASCII symbols though.

    --
    http://www.hunterandlori.com
    , Feb 3, 2005
    #14
  15. On 2005-02-03, Peter Wyzl <> wrote:
    ><> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >: Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to pronounce
    >: "~" and "#" in English
    >
    > ~ is spelt tilde but pronounced tild or tilled


    Actually, that 'e' is not silent. See, for instance,
    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=tilde

    (for more on that schwa on the end, try
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwa)

    dha

    --
    David H. Adler - <> - http://www.panix.com/~dha/
    It's amazing what giant mutant ants that are the result of Man's
    dabbling with the power of atomic energy can accomplish when they set
    themselves to the task. - Mark Rogaski
    David H. Adler, Feb 3, 2005
    #15
  16. Paul Lalli wrote :
    ><> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to pronounce
    >> "~" and "#" in English

    >
    > In addition to the other responses, you should be aware that some people
    > refer to '#' as a 'number sign'.


    .... and others as 'garden fence'
    a musician, however, would tell you this is a 'sharp symbol'
    see http://cnx.rice.edu/content/m10943/latest/

    Regards
    Martin

    SCNR

    --
    perl -e 'print 7.74.117.115.116.11.32.13.97.110.111.116.104.101.114.11
    ..32.13.112.101.114.108.11.32.13.104.97.99.107.101.114.10.7'
    Martin Kissner, Feb 3, 2005
    #16
  17. Re: a very bad question (and getting OT)

    Allen Windhorn wrote:
    > In American English (an oxymoron, probably)


    Rather a contradiction

    jue
    Jürgen Exner, Feb 3, 2005
    #17
  18. wrote :
    > wrote:
    >> Hi guys, prepare for a bad question... I want to know how to
    >> pronounce "~" and "#" in English

    >
    > Larry <> wrote:
    >> Tilde and Pound sir.

    >
    > Ah. You must be using American English.
    >
    > In English English it's "tilde" and (usually) "hash", respectively.


    So my version of *nix obviously speaks English English.
    see `man ftp | less -p hash` if yours do so, too.

    SCNR
    Martin

    --
    perl -e 'print 7.74.117.115.116.11.32.13.97.110.111.116.104.101.114.11
    ..32.13.112.101.114.108.11.32.13.104.97.99.107.101.114.10.7'
    Martin Kissner, Feb 3, 2005
    #18
  19. Re: a very bad question (and getting OT)

    Jürgen Exner wrote:

    > Allen Windhorn wrote:
    >> In American English (an oxymoron, probably)

    >
    > Rather a contradiction
    >

    Well, yes, that's what an oxymoron is, you know.
    Like "Large medium", "jumbo shrimp", or "military
    intelligence".

    --
    Christopher Mattern

    "Which one you figure tracked us?"
    "The ugly one, sir."
    "...Could you be more specific?"
    Chris Mattern, Feb 3, 2005
    #19
  20. Re: a very bad question (and getting OT)

    "Jürgen Exner" <> writes:
    > Allen Windhorn wrote:
    >> In American English (an oxymoron, probably)

    >
    > Rather a contradiction


    Neither. It's a perfectly valid, if wholly inadequate (Which
    America? Deep South? Appalachia? Midwest? New England?)
    description for a dialect of English.

    See "The American Language", Mencken et. al., for further info.

    -=Eric, tired of the America-baiting
    --
    Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million
    typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare.
    -- Blair Houghton.
    Eric Schwartz, Feb 3, 2005
    #20
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