About C programming language book K&R

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by ashu, May 4, 2012.

  1. ashu

    ashu Guest

    Dear friends,
    i am reading this book to learn C programming.Even i had read some
    other books but some says it best book.But i am finding it difficult
    to understand.May be K&R are too smart and i am too dumb.otherwise
    exercises are tough to answer and examples are too advance for a new
    comer. What should i do?
    ashu, May 4, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. ashu <> writes:

    > Dear friends,
    > i am reading this book to learn C programming.Even i had read some
    > other books but some says it best book.But i am finding it difficult
    > to understand.May be K&R are too smart and i am too dumb.otherwise
    > exercises are tough to answer and examples are too advance for a new
    > comer. What should i do?


    Unfortunately there is no simple answer. There are so many factors that
    affect how well someone gets on with a particular book that it almost
    impossible to give advice. It's not as simple as finding an "easier"
    book, because it might be worse for other reasons. You need to find a
    book that not only suits your style of learning and your existing
    knowledge, but covers what you need it to cover. For example, you might
    need a book that also introduces programming ideas rather than simply
    the C programming language.

    Not a lot of help, I know. Do you have access to a library? If so, you
    can give several book a go without spending a lot of money.

    --
    Ben.
    Ben Bacarisse, May 4, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. ashu

    ashu Guest

    On May 4, 5:13 pm, Ben Bacarisse <> wrote:
    > ashu <> writes:
    > > Dear friends,
    > > i am reading this book to learn C programming.Even i had read some
    > > other books but some says it best book.But i am finding it difficult
    > > to understand.May be K&R are too smart and i am too dumb.otherwise
    > > exercises are tough to answer and examples are too advance for a new
    > > comer. What should i do?

    >
    > Unfortunately there is no simple answer.  There are so many factors that
    > affect how well someone gets on with a particular book that it almost
    > impossible to give advice.  It's not as simple as finding an "easier"
    > book, because it might be worse for other reasons.  You need to find a
    > book that not only suits your style of learning and your existing
    > knowledge, but covers what you need it to cover.  For example, you might
    > need a book that also introduces programming ideas rather than simply
    > the C programming language.
    >
    > Not a lot of help, I know.  Do you have access to a library?  If so, you
    > can give several book a go without spending a lot of money.
    >
    > --
    > Ben.


    Thankx ben,
    i am giving more atention on simple examples and experimenting with
    them rather than just reading ,may be i will start gasping idea.i
    think thats the authors wanted. Learning from the best has its pros
    and cons.
    :)
    ashu, May 4, 2012
    #3
  4. ashu

    Guest

    On Friday, May 4, 2012 1:22:20 PM UTC+1, ashu wrote:
    > On May 4, 5:13 pm, Ben Bacarisse <> wrote:
    > > ashu <> writes:
    > > > Dear friends,
    > > > i am reading this book to learn C programming.Even i had read some
    > > > other books but some says it best book.But i am finding it difficult
    > > > to understand.May be K&R are too smart and i am too dumb.otherwise
    > > > exercises are tough to answer and examples are too advance for a new
    > > > comer. What should i do?

    > >
    > > Unfortunately there is no simple answer.  There are so many factors that
    > > affect how well someone gets on with a particular book that it almost
    > > impossible to give advice.  It's not as simple as finding an "easier"
    > > book, because it might be worse for other reasons.  You need to find a
    > > book that not only suits your style of learning and your existing
    > > knowledge, but covers what you need it to cover.  For example, you might
    > > need a book that also introduces programming ideas rather than simply
    > > the C programming language.
    > >
    > > Not a lot of help, I know.  Do you have access to a library?  If so, you
    > > can give several book a go without spending a lot of money.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ben.

    >
    > Thankx ben,
    > i am giving more atention on simple examples and experimenting with
    > them rather than just reading ,may be i will start gasping idea.i
    > think thats the authors wanted. Learning from the best has its pros
    > and cons.
    > :)


    K&R is a very "dense" book, there is a lot of information packed into very few pages. In my experience of mentoring someone K&R is difficult for programming beginners, one reasons being the lack of "model" answers to the questions. Look for the comp.lang.c wiki a project now moribund (or last time Ilooked it was) but it did provide model answers to K&Rs questions. But if you use them you *must* try to answer the questions yourself first.
    , May 5, 2012
    #4
  5. <> wrote in message
    news:19373891.198.1336231017277.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@vbvx4...

    > K&R is a very "dense" book, there is a lot of information packed into very
    > few pages. In my
    > experience of mentoring someone K&R is difficult for programming
    > beginners, one reasons
    > being the lack of "model" answers to the questions. Look for the
    > comp.lang.c wiki a project
    > now moribund (or last time I looked it was) but it did provide model
    > answers to K&Rs
    > questions. But if you use them you *must* try to answer the questions
    > yourself first.


    But the density of information is what I *liked* about K&R. And I used K&R
    one to learn C
    in the beginnin, although it was *not* my first language. I really dislike
    the books that
    have so much fluff... that you have to read a half dozen pages to come up
    with three or four
    pieces of *real* information. I think it's called "dumbing down".

    --

    numerist at aquaporin4 dot com
    Charles Richmond, May 6, 2012
    #5
  6. "Charles Richmond" <> writes:

    > <> wrote in message
    > news:19373891.198.1336231017277.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@vbvx4...
    >
    >> K&R is a very "dense" book, there is a lot of information packed
    >> into very few pages.

    <snip>
    > But the density of information is what I *liked* about K&R.


    Me too. In fact I now have a phrase: "the K&R of ...". I am always
    searching for "the K&R of go", "the K&R of Python" and so on. There are
    very few K&Rs out there.

    <snip>
    --
    Ben.
    Ben Bacarisse, May 6, 2012
    #6
  7. ashu

    Guest

    On Sunday, May 6, 2012 8:27:31 PM UTC+1, Charles Richmond wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:19373891.198.1336231017277.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@vbvx4...
    >
    > > K&R is a very "dense" book, there is a lot of information packed into very
    > > few pages. In my
    > > experience of mentoring someone K&R is difficult for programming
    > > beginners, one reasons
    > > being the lack of "model" answers to the questions. Look for the
    > > comp.lang.c wiki a project
    > > now moribund (or last time I looked it was) but it did provide model
    > > answers to K&Rs
    > > questions. But if you use them you *must* try to answer the questions
    > > yourself first.

    >
    > But the density of information is what I *liked* about K&R.


    it was a statement not a critcism. I was attempting to explain why some beginners found it hard going. I loved it, but C was not my first programming language.

    > And I used K&R one to learn C
    > in the beginnin, although it was *not* my first language. I really dislike
    > the books that
    > have so much fluff...


    ditto. But you and I aren't the entirity of the programming community. Cute icons, big margins, cartoons are notmy cup of tea in a programming book. Did Knuth have cartoons?

    > that you have to read a half dozen pages to come up
    > with three or four
    > pieces of *real* information. I think it's called "dumbing down".


    ever read any of "Head Up" stuff? They drive me insane.
    , May 7, 2012
    #7
  8. ashu

    TonyMc Guest

    On Mon, 7 May 2012 05:11:38 -0700 (PDT),
    wrote:

    > Did Knuth have cartoons?


    Yes, in both "The TeXBook" and "The METAFONT Book".

    Tony
    TonyMc, May 8, 2012
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Harry Meier
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    646
    Andrew Koenig
    Sep 8, 2003
  2. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    471
    Puppet_Sock
    Jun 21, 2006
  3. Mike
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    298
    F.J.K.
    Sep 20, 2006
  4. Akira Kitada
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    843
    Paul Rubin
    Feb 12, 2009
  5. Bharat Ruparel
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    207
    James Britt
    Mar 4, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page