alt tag for an anchor link?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Paul Furman, Feb 12, 2004.

  1. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    There is no such thing right?

    <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>
    Paul Furman, Feb 12, 2004
    #1
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  2. Paul Furman wrote:

    > There is no such thing right?
    >
    > <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>


    Text to display in the event that the link can't be displayed? No, there
    isn't - it wouldn't make sense.

    Of course, you probably don't understand what alt is really all about, and
    what you really want to do is entirely achievable.

    Have a read of http://ppewww.ph.gla.ac.uk/~flavell/alt/alt-text.html

    --
    David Dorward <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    David Dorward, Feb 12, 2004
    #2
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  3. Paul Furman <> wrote:

    > <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>


    "Click here" is bullshit anyway.
    <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>

    So write <a href="thispage.html">this page</a> or
    <a href="thispage.html" title="that page">this page</a>
    with the TITLE attribute.

    --
    Top-posting.
    What's the most irritating thing on Usenet?
    Andreas Prilop, Feb 12, 2004
    #3
  4. Paul Furman wrote:
    > There is no such thing right?
    >
    > <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>


    Guess you are thinking about "title":
    <a href="thispage.htm" title="this page">click here</a>

    --
    Inger Helene Falch-Jacobsen
    http://home.online.no/~ingerfaj/
    Inger Helene Falch-Jacobsen, Feb 12, 2004
    #4
  5. Paul Furman

    GD Guest

    Paul Furman <> wrote:
    > There is no such thing right?
    > <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>


    No, and you shouldn't be using the alt attribute for what you're doing
    with images! The TITLE attribute is for displaying tooltips, it's wrong
    that MSIE shows you the alt text like this. Other browsers like Mozilla
    and Opera will not show users the alt text when they hover over the
    image.

    Also, don't use 'click here' as link text! Use something more
    sensible/meaningful.

    <img
    src="file.gif"
    alt="This is meaningful alternative text for when the image isn't displayed"
    title="This is complimentary text that the user (usually) sees in a tooltip"
    >


    Thank goodness for <a href="http://www.w3.org/" title="The W3C website,
    part of the MSN network&trade;">web standards</a>!


    The above examples will display text when you hover and still make sense
    to everyone from blind users to people with modern standards-orientated
    browsers :)
    GD, Feb 12, 2004
    #5
  6. Andreas Prilop wrote:

    > Paul Furman <> wrote:
    >
    >> <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>

    >
    > "Click here" is bullshit anyway.
    > <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>
    >
    > So write <a href="thispage.html">this page</a>


    I think "this page" is almost as bad as "click here".

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
    Toby A Inkster, Feb 12, 2004
    #6
  7. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    David Dorward wrote:
    >
    > Of course, you probably don't understand what alt is really all about, and
    > what you really want to do is entirely achievable.
    >
    > Have a read of http://ppewww.ph.gla.ac.uk/~flavell/alt/alt-text.html



    I understand alt as substitute text for when the image doesn't display.

    Is [title="Joe's page"] incorrect, as a tool-tip generator?
    Paul Furman, Feb 12, 2004
    #7
  8. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Andreas Prilop wrote:
    >
    > "Click here" is bullshit anyway.
    > <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>
    >
    > So write <a href="thispage.html">this page</a> or
    > <a href="thispage.html" title="that page">this page</a>
    > with the TITLE attribute.


    Great thanks!
    So many basic things I don't know.

    The "click here" was just for demonstration but that's a good
    explanation of a more logical syntax.
    Paul Furman, Feb 12, 2004
    #8
  9. Paul Furman

    Augustus Guest

    "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There is no such thing right?
    >
    > <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>


    you want to use TITLE instead of ALT
    Augustus, Feb 12, 2004
    #9
  10. Toby A Inkster <> wrote:

    >> So write <a href="thispage.html">this page</a>

    >
    > I think "this page" is almost as bad as "click here".


    If you take "this page" literally, of course! You snipped away my
    title="that page", which is nonsense also when taken literally.

    I assumed that you substitute *real expressions* for the dummy
    "thispage.html", "this page", "that page" - for example:

    <a href="http://www.unics.uni-hannover.de/nhtcapri/arabic-alphabet.html6"
    title="The Infidel's Guide to The Arabic Alphabet"
    charset="ISO-8859-6">The Arabic Alphabet</a>
    Andreas Prilop, Feb 12, 2004
    #10
  11. Paul Furman

    Eric Bohlman Guest

    Toby A Inkster <> wrote in
    news:p:

    > Andreas Prilop wrote:
    >
    >> Paul Furman <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> <a href="thispage.htm" alt="this page">click here</a>

    >>
    >> "Click here" is bullshit anyway.
    >> <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>
    >>
    >> So write <a href="thispage.html">this page</a>

    >
    > I think "this page" is almost as bad as "click here".


    And for the same reason: it says nothing about what makes that link
    different from any other link on the page. Visual users skim for links
    almost unconsciously; text-to-speech users can hear a list of links read or
    tab between; users of modern browsers can get a sidebar or a popup showing
    all the links coming off a page. If all the link texts say more or less
    the same thing, the user is forced to read, rather than scan, the content
    in order to find out where he wants to go next, slowing him down and
    increasing the "cognitive load."

    Link texts need to really stand out, which means not only that they should
    be unique within a page, but they should be short and simple without any
    "padding." For example, words like "available" should not appear in link
    text because including them doesn't add any meaning; if a resource wasn't
    available, you wouldn't be linking to it, now would you? Similarly,
    "download" shouldn't appear in link text unless it's the only download link
    on the page. "Here" should be completely avoided; the user already knows
    that the resource is where it is rather than someplace else.
    Eric Bohlman, Feb 13, 2004
    #11
  12. Eric Bohlman wrote:

    > Toby A Inkster <> wrote in
    > news:p:
    >
    >> I think "this page" is almost as bad as "click here".

    >
    > And for the same reason: it says nothing about what makes that link
    > different from any other link on the page.


    Well, "click here" is bad for two reasons. "This page" is only bad for the
    first of them.

    1. "click here" does not describe what's on the other end of the link.

    2. "click here" is not device-independent. It assumes the use of a mouse
    or similar pointing device.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
    Toby A Inkster, Feb 13, 2004
    #12
  13. Toby A Inkster <> wrote:

    > Well, "click here" is bad for two reasons. "This page" is only bad
    > for the first of them.
    >
    > 1. "click here" does not describe what's on the other end of the
    > link.


    You can put it that way, but it really includes a large set of reasons,
    see http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www/click.html

    > 2. "click here" is not device-independent. It assumes the use of a
    > mouse or similar pointing device.


    That's true.

    But "This page" is bad for yet another reason: the pronoun "this"
    normally refers to _this_, i.e. something that is immediately at hand,
    such as the page on which the phrase "this page" occurs.

    If you think that nobody could ever misunderstand it that way, you can
    look forward to learning new features of the human mind. There is
    absolutely nothing that cannot be misunderstood, and all communication
    inevitably fails - though sometimes just partially, and by using
    reasonable link texts we make the accidental successes more probable.

    Since this originally resulted from the text of a dummy link, I think
    the morale is: Be clever when writing dummy texts. Dummies can be
    smart. And every time your write an example, you give an example.
    So make it a good example.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
    Jukka K. Korpela, Feb 13, 2004
    #13
  14. Paul Furman

    JohnNotion

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
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    JohnNotion, Apr 13, 2012
    #14
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