Amazon: "Practical Django Projects" by James Bennett (June 2008)

Discussion in 'Python' started by Dave U. Random, Jul 14, 2008.

  1. Dave U. Random, Jul 14, 2008
    #1
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  2. Stefan Scholl, Jul 16, 2008
    #2
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  3. Stefan Scholl wrote:

    > Django isn't ready.


    That's a remarkably ignorant statement.

    </F>
     
    Fredrik Lundh, Jul 16, 2008
    #3
  4. Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    > Stefan Scholl wrote:
    >
    >> Django isn't ready.

    >
    > That's a remarkably ignorant statement.


    The 1.0 release will be in September.


    --
    Web (en): http://www.no-spoon.de/ -*- Web (de): http://www.frell.de/
     
    Stefan Scholl, Jul 17, 2008
    #4
  5. Re: Amazon: "Practical Django Projects" by James Bennett (June2008)

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 05:41:11 +0200, Stefan Scholl wrote:

    > Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    >> Stefan Scholl wrote:
    >>
    >>> Django isn't ready.

    >>
    >> That's a remarkably ignorant statement.

    >
    > The 1.0 release will be in September.


    So what? It's not the version number that matters but features and
    stability. It's not uncommon in open source projects to have very usable
    software with a version number below 1.0.

    Ciao,
    Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch
     
    Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch, Jul 17, 2008
    #5
  6. Stefan Scholl wrote:

    >>> Django isn't ready.

    >>
    >> That's a remarkably ignorant statement.

    >
    > The 1.0 release will be in September.


    So? "1.0" will be done then, yes. In what way does that mean that
    Django itself isn't ready, in any sane sense of that word?

    (For bystanders, Django's 0.91 release in early 1996 was what most
    people would have called "1.0". 0.95 was a "2.0" release, and the
    upcoming 1.0 release is pretty much a "3.0". Or if you use Micro-
    soft's numbering system, 0.91 was "3.0", 0.95 is "5.0" and 1.0 is,
    what, "8.0"?)

    </F>
     
    Fredrik Lundh, Jul 17, 2008
    #6
  7. Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch <> wrote:
    > On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 05:41:11 +0200, Stefan Scholl wrote:
    >> Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    >>> Stefan Scholl wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Django isn't ready.
    >>>
    >>> That's a remarkably ignorant statement.

    >>
    >> The 1.0 release will be in September.

    >
    > So what? It's not the version number that matters but features and
    > stability. It's not uncommon in open source projects to have very usable
    > software with a version number below 1.0.


    The book is about the development version, which was current at
    the time the book was written. See page 4.


    Nobody says something about "Book after feature freeze" (or
    similar). Instead I get "ignorant statement" and "usable
    software".

    My conclusion: This book isn't about a stable release and not
    about a future stable release. (And even if it was about the last
    stable relase, too much has changed and will change until
    September 2008. IMHO.)


    And by the way: The quote was changed by deleting something on
    the same line:

    "June 2008 is a bit too early. Django isn't ready."

    vs.

    "Django isn't ready."


    --
    Web (en): http://www.no-spoon.de/ -*- Web (de): http://www.frell.de/
     
    Stefan Scholl, Jul 17, 2008
    #7
  8. Stefan Scholl wrote:

    > And by the way: The quote was changed by deleting something on
    > the same line:
    >
    > "June 2008 is a bit too early. Django isn't ready."
    >
    > vs.
    >
    > "Django isn't ready."


    Is this a language issue? That you meant to write "django 1.0 isn't
    done" (as in "completed; finished") but accidentally wrote "django isn't
    ready" (where "ready" is usually read as "completely prepared or in fit
    condition for immediate action or use")?

    (and the "stable release" and "much will change" stuff is pure FUD, of
    course. what competing project will I find if I google your name?)

    </F>
     
    Fredrik Lundh, Jul 17, 2008
    #8
  9. Dave U. Random

    alex23 Guest

    On Jul 17, 6:04 pm, Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    > Django's 0.91 release in early 1996


    While I totally agree with position, I'm pretty sure you mean 2006
    here :)
     
    alex23, Jul 17, 2008
    #9
  10. Dave U. Random

    Guest

    On 16 juil, 10:35, Stefan Scholl <> wrote:
    > Dave U. Random <> wrote:
    >
    > >http://snipr.com/PracticalDjango

    >
    > June 2008 is a bit too early. Django isn't ready.


    Oh, really ? Too bad. But, wait... If Django isn't ready, what's that
    framework I've been using for almost three years now, then ???
     
    , Jul 17, 2008
    #10
  11. Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    > (and the "stable release" and "much will change" stuff is pure FUD, of
    > course. what competing project will I find if I google your name?)


    Found something? Maybe this could help me to choose a web
    framework.


    --
    Web (en): http://www.no-spoon.de/ -*- Web (de): http://www.frell.de/
     
    Stefan Scholl, Jul 19, 2008
    #11
  12. Torsten Bronger a écrit :
    > Hallöchen!
    >
    > writes:
    >
    >> On 16 juil, 10:35, Stefan Scholl <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Dave U. Random <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> http://snipr.com/PracticalDjango
    >>> June 2008 is a bit too early. Django isn't ready.

    >> Oh, really ? Too bad. But, wait... If Django isn't ready, what's
    >> that framework I've been using for almost three years now, then
    >> ???

    >
    > Before writing sarcastic comments, reading the thread would be
    > really polite.


    You may not have notice, but applied to a piece of software, "ready" is
    usually understood as "ready for production use". Which Django is, and
    has been for years now.
     
    Bruno Desthuilliers, Jul 19, 2008
    #12
  13. Dave U. Random

    Paul Boddie Guest

    On 17 Jul, 11:09, Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    >
    > (and the "stable release" and "much will change" stuff is pure FUD, of
    > course. what competing project will I find if I google your name?)


    That's a bit unfair. Maybe the guy was stung by previous experiences
    with books and certain other frameworks. It seems to me that the
    Django people have been quite cautious with the APIs and with their
    own book, but it isn't as if nothing has been changing with respect to
    the APIs and the preferred ways of doing things in Django.

    And I have to add that books which refer the reader to various Web
    sites in order to find out the status of the code, qualifying the
    prose with "by the time you read this", don't give a great impression.
    I can't say that the book referenced here does that, although short of
    a 1.0 release, I find it unlikely that the author could avoid it.

    Paul
     
    Paul Boddie, Jul 19, 2008
    #13
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