ANNOUNCE:-- TimingAnalyzer Free Version -- Draw timing diagrams

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by timinganalyzer, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. Hello All,

    The TimingAnalyzer can be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    diagrams.
    Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    added
    from the GUI.

    It can also be used to quickly do a timing analysis and check for
    timing faults. Minimum, typical, and worst case analysis can be
    performed.
    Delays and constraints are easily specified and changed to see if
    faster
    clocks or slower parts can be used without any timing faults.

    There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    Edition(SE),
    and the Professional Edition(PE).

    You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    TimingAnalyzer at:

    www.timing-diagrams.com

    Comments and feedback are welcome at

     
    timinganalyzer, Jun 2, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. timinganalyzer

    Andy Peters Guest

    On Jun 2, 5:58 am, timinganalyzer <> wrote:
    > Hello All,
    >
    > The TimingAnalyzer can be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    > diagrams.
    > Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    > added
    > from the GUI.
    >
    > It can also be used to quickly do a timing analysis and check for
    > timing faults. Minimum, typical, and worst case analysis can be
    > performed.
    > Delays and constraints are easily specified and changed to see if
    > faster
    > clocks or slower parts can be used without any timing faults.
    >
    > There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    > Edition(SE),
    > and the Professional Edition(PE).
    >
    > You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    > TimingAnalyzer at:
    >
    > www.timing-diagrams.com
    >
    > Comments and feedback are welcome at
    >
    >


    Hey, it's back!

    It's good to see that this hasn't died. The commercial alternatives
    are WAAAAAY too expensive.

    -a
     
    Andy Peters, Jun 2, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Jun 2, 5:40 pm, Andy Peters <> wrote:
    > On Jun 2, 5:58 am, timinganalyzer <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hello All,

    >
    > > The TimingAnalyzer can be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    > > diagrams.
    > > Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    > > added
    > > from the GUI.

    >
    > > It can also be used to quickly do a timing analysis and check for
    > > timing faults. Minimum, typical, and worst case analysis can be
    > > performed.
    > > Delays and constraints are easily specified and changed to see if
    > > faster
    > > clocks or slower parts can be used without any timing faults.

    >
    > > There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    > > Edition(SE),
    > > and the Professional Edition(PE).

    >
    > > You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    > > TimingAnalyzer at:

    >
    > >www.timing-diagrams.com

    >
    > > Comments and feedback are welcome at

    >
    > >

    >
    > Hey, it's back!
    >
    > It's good to see that this hasn't died. The commercial alternatives
    > are WAAAAAY too expensive.
    >
    > -a


    Yes, it's alive and doing well, and yes the competition is expensive.
    The TimingAnalyzer will not be. I'm trying very hard to make it as
    easy as
    possible to use.

    Please feel free to request new features or suggest feature
    improvements.

    Regards,
    Dan
     
    timinganalyzer, Jun 3, 2008
    #3
  4. timinganalyzer

    rickman Guest

    On Jun 2, 8:37 pm, timinganalyzer <> wrote:
    > On Jun 2, 5:40 pm, Andy Peters <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jun 2, 5:58 am,timinganalyzer<> wrote:

    >
    > > > Hello All,

    >
    > > > TheTimingAnalyzercan be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    > > > diagrams.
    > > > Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    > > > added
    > > > from the GUI.

    >
    > > > It can also be used to quickly do a timing analysis and check for
    > > > timing faults. Minimum, typical, and worst case analysis can be
    > > > performed.
    > > > Delays and constraints are easily specified and changed to see if
    > > > faster
    > > > clocks or slower parts can be used without any timing faults.

    >
    > > > There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    > > > Edition(SE),
    > > > and the Professional Edition(PE).

    >
    > > > You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    > > >TimingAnalyzerat:

    >
    > > >www.timing-diagrams.com

    >
    > > > Comments and feedback are welcome at

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > Hey, it's back!

    >
    > > It's good to see that this hasn't died. The commercial alternatives
    > > are WAAAAAY too expensive.

    >
    > > -a

    >
    > Yes, it's alive and doing well, and yes the competition is expensive.
    > TheTimingAnalyzerwill not be. I'm trying very hard to make it as
    > easy as
    > possible to use.
    >
    > Please feel free to request new features or suggest feature
    > improvements.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Dan


    I installed the program and it ran once. But when I try to run it a
    second time, it will not start. Any ideas?
     
    rickman, Jun 4, 2008
    #4
  5. timinganalyzer

    rickman Guest

    On Jun 4, 1:36 pm, rickman <> wrote:
    > On Jun 2, 8:37 pm, timinganalyzer <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jun 2, 5:40 pm, Andy Peters <> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Jun 2, 5:58 am,timinganalyzer<> wrote:

    >
    > > > > Hello All,

    >
    > > > > TheTimingAnalyzercan be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    > > > > diagrams.
    > > > > Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    > > > > added
    > > > > from the GUI.

    >
    > > > > It can also be used to quickly do a timing analysis and check for
    > > > > timing faults. Minimum, typical, and worst case analysis can be
    > > > > performed.
    > > > > Delays and constraints are easily specified and changed to see if
    > > > > faster
    > > > > clocks or slower parts can be used without any timing faults.

    >
    > > > > There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    > > > > Edition(SE),
    > > > > and the Professional Edition(PE).

    >
    > > > > You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    > > > >TimingAnalyzerat:

    >
    > > > >www.timing-diagrams.com

    >
    > > > > Comments and feedback are welcome at

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > > > Hey, it's back!

    >
    > > > It's good to see that this hasn't died. The commercial alternatives
    > > > are WAAAAAY too expensive.

    >
    > > > -a

    >
    > > Yes, it's alive and doing well, and yes the competition is expensive.
    > > TheTimingAnalyzerwill not be. I'm trying very hard to make it as
    > > easy as
    > > possible to use.

    >
    > > Please feel free to request new features or suggest feature
    > > improvements.

    >
    > > Regards,
    > > Dan

    >
    > I installed the program and it ran once. But when I try to run it a
    > second time, it will not start. Any ideas?


    To get some info on why it won't run I ran it in a DOS box.

    TimingAnalyzer Version 0.82 Free Edition(FE)
    OS Name = Windows 2000
    OS Version = 5.0
    OS Arch = x86
    Java Version = 1.6.0_03
    installDir = C:\Program Files\TimingAnalyzer_b82
    Settings File = C:\Program Files\TimingAnalyzer_b82\settings
    \ta_defaults

    Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException
    at org.dmad.ta.TimingDiagram.findEdge(TimingDiagram.java:2238)
    at org.dmad.ta.TimFileIO.readDelay(TimFileIO.java:481)
    at org.dmad.ta.TimFileIO.processFileRequest(TimFileIO.java:
    1245)
    at org.dmad.ta.TimFileIO.<init>(TimFileIO.java:103)
    at org.dmad.ta.TimingDiagram.openFile(TimingDiagram.java:3641)
    at
    org.dmad.ta.TimingAnalyzer.openRecentFile(TimingAnalyzer.java:1682)
    at
    org.dmad.ta.TimingAnalyzer.loadOpenFileList(TimingAnalyzer.java:1511)

    at org.dmad.ta.TimingAnalyzer.<init>(TimingAnalyzer.java:314)
    at org.dmad.ta.TimingAnalyzer.main(TimingAnalyzer.java:138)
     
    rickman, Jun 4, 2008
    #5
  6. timinganalyzer

    rickman Guest

    On Jun 2, 8:58 am, timinganalyzer <> wrote:
    > Hello All,
    >
    > The TimingAnalyzer can be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    > diagrams.
    > Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    > added
    > from the GUI.
    >
    > It can also be used to quickly do a timing analysis and check for
    > timing faults. Minimum, typical, and worst case analysis can be
    > performed.
    > Delays and constraints are easily specified and changed to see if
    > faster
    > clocks or slower parts can be used without any timing faults.
    >
    > There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    > Edition(SE),
    > and the Professional Edition(PE).
    >
    > You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    > TimingAnalyzer at:
    >
    > www.timing-diagrams.com
    >
    > Comments and feedback are welcome at
    >
    >


    I spent about 5 minutes working with this program before I gave up.
    My reason is not the problem posted below, but because of the user
    interface decisions made. I don't know why every new program has to
    reinvent something about the user interface. There is a standard call
    Common User Interface (CUI) that is even documented by Microsoft,
    IIRC.

    The one big difference that hit me up side my head was the way the
    Cntl key is used counter-intuitively with mouse clicks for
    selections. If you click on one item it is selected. If you click on
    an second item, it is *added* to the selections. To deselect
    something you have to either press the Cntl key while clicking on it
    or you have to use the ESC key. I have *never* seen a program use
    this sort of selection mechanism. I have seen variations on how you
    select multiple, but every other program I have ever worked with, the
    default action of clicking a new thing while an old thing was selected
    was to deselect the first thing and to select the new thing.

    It was more than once that I tried to move some things and ended up
    with a mess because extra moves kept happening. Combine this with the
    lack of a working undo feature and I ended up rather frustrated and
    gave up. I was looking for something that would save me time over a
    program like Visio.

    I suggest that the author get some references on CUI or better yet,
    use some other programs with graphical interfaces and go with the
    flow. It is so much more productive than trying to retrain the
    world... if you don't believe me, just look down at your keyboard. Do
    you think the keyboard layout we all use was a good idea? It's just
    easier to continue to use it than it is to retrain everyone that is
    using it now.

    Rick
     
    rickman, Jun 4, 2008
    #6
  7. On Jun 4, 3:44 pm, rickman <> wrote:
    > On Jun 2, 8:58 am, timinganalyzer <> wrote:
    >



    >
    >
    > > Hello All,

    >
    > > The TimingAnalyzer can be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    > > diagrams.
    > > Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    > > added
    > > from the GUI.

    >
    > > It can also be used to quickly do a timing analysis and check for
    > > timing faults. Minimum, typical, and worst case analysis can be
    > > performed.
    > > Delays and constraints are easily specified and changed to see if
    > > faster
    > > clocks or slower parts can be used without any timing faults.

    >
    > > There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    > > Edition(SE),
    > > and the Professional Edition(PE).

    >
    > > You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    > > TimingAnalyzer at:

    >
    > >www.timing-diagrams.com

    >
    > > Comments and feedback are welcome at

    >
    > >

    >
    > I spent about 5 minutes working with this program before I gave up.
    > My reason is not the problem posted below, but because of the user
    > interface decisions made. I don't know why every new program has to
    > reinvent something about the user interface. There is a standard call
    > Common User Interface (CUI) that is even documented by Microsoft,
    > IIRC.
    >
    > The one big difference that hit me up side my head was the way the
    > Cntl key is used counter-intuitively with mouse clicks for
    > selections. If you click on one item it is selected. If you click on
    > an second item, it is *added* to the selections. To deselect
    > something you have to either press the Cntl key while clicking on it
    > or you have to use the ESC key. I have *never* seen a program use
    > this sort of selection mechanism. I have seen variations on how you
    > select multiple, but every other program I have ever worked with, the
    > default action of clicking a new thing while an old thing was selected
    > was to deselect the first thing and to select the new thing.
    >
    > It was more than once that I tried to move some things and ended up
    > with a mess because extra moves kept happening. Combine this with the
    > lack of a working undo feature and I ended up rather frustrated and
    > gave up. I was looking for something that would save me time over a
    > program like Visio.
    >
    > I suggest that the author get some references on CUI or better yet,
    > use some other programs with graphical interfaces and go with the
    > flow. It is so much more productive than trying to retrain the
    > world... if you don't believe me, just look down at your keyboard. Do
    > you think the keyboard layout we all use was a good idea? It's just
    > easier to continue to use it than it is to retrain everyone that is
    > using it now.
    >
    > Rick



    Hello Rick,

    The goal is to make drawing timing diagrams as easy as possible, and
    I do agree about sticking to standard GUI practices, and that should
    be
    done for each OS.

    The program is in beta testing and I know it's not perfect but don't
    forget to look at the big picture. Not only can you draw timing
    diagrams,
    you can do timing analysis and show margins and find faults in
    designs,
    you can write scripts that automatically draw the diagrams so complex
    diagrams can be made with one command, or test vectors or testbenches
    can
    be generated with one command. If you need to document simulation
    results,
    it can read VCD formated files, then you can make annotated timing
    diagrams from
    simulations and include them in design documentation. With actual
    logic
    functions you can simulate gates, registers, counters, shift
    registers, and
    other logic functions which can help when deciding if the logic if
    fast
    enough or the clocks are to fast.

    So, keeping all that in mind, if beta users make valid and
    constructive suggestions
    for improvements and new features, they will incorporated into the
    program. Most all
    of them will be added before the final release 1.0.

    -Dan
     
    timinganalyzer, Jun 5, 2008
    #7
  8. timinganalyzer

    rickman Guest

    On Jun 5, 9:14 am, Brian Drummond <>
    wrote:
    > On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 12:44:03 -0700 (PDT), rickman <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Jun 2, 8:58 am, timinganalyzer <> wrote:
    > >> Hello All,

    >
    > >> The TimingAnalyzer can be used to quickly and easily draw timing
    > >> diagrams.
    > >> Signals, clocks, buses, delays, constraints, and states are easily
    > >> added
    > >> from the GUI.
    > >>www.timing-diagrams.com

    >
    > >> Comments and feedback are welcome at

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >I spent about 5 minutes working with this program before I gave up.
    > >My reason is not the problem posted below, but because of the user
    > >interface decisions made. I don't know why every new program has to
    > >reinvent something about the user interface. There is a standard call
    > >Common User Interface (CUI) that is even documented by Microsoft,
    > >IIRC.

    >
    > Do you work in the NHS, or for one of their equipment suppliers?
    > All the CUI references (includinghttp://www.mscui.net/seem to be
    > associated with the health care sector.


    I have no idea what you are talking about... I am an electronic
    design engineer and have never worked in the health care sector. What
    exactly is NHS? Is that a government agency or a company? BTW, I
    typoed above "call" should have been "called". CUI is a windows
    standard as far as I know. I guess maybe it is more general, but I
    have only heard the term used in the context of Windows.


    > If you are thinking of some other user interface specification, can you
    > help find it?


    Doesn't Microsoft provide a CUI for Windows? If nothing else, all you
    have to do is fire up most *any* program to learn how mouse clicks
    work to select items. Having the default action of a click to be
    "adding" items to the selection is a new twist. Most programs use
    Cntl-Left Click to cumulatively select items (or often to unselect
    them too). Unselection is typically done by clicking on *anything*
    else including nothing. So if I click on object A and then click on
    object B and drag, I would not expect object A to be dragged along
    with B. This happened to me with this program. Object A was dragged
    off the view and the undo didn't work. I couldn't find a way to
    expand the view, so I ended up with a drawing that had things in it
    that I couldn't delete or see. I ended up closing the program (partly
    out of frustration and partly out of time constraints) and let it save
    the file. I tried to start the program up again and it would not
    run. The author says the drawing file is now corrupt. When the
    program auto-opens it on startup, it crashes.

    Independant of the UI issues, a program really shouldn't crash when it
    reads a data file... of any nature. Of course that is a theoretical
    goal and can be difficult to achieve in practice. But certainly
    crashing on startup without visible error messages is not a good thing
    either. I had to start it from a DOS box to get anything useful from
    it... maybe that is more of a Java issue... and don't get me started
    complaining about Java. Does *anything* written in Java actually
    work?

    I'm really not trying to bash the tool. I expect there are those who
    like it and use it. I have often wanted a good tool for drawing
    waveforms and timing diagrams. But the very first and most important
    feature is that it has to be easy and intuitive to use. I feel that I
    should be able to sit down and use it without reading a manual or
    taking a tutorial. Many years ago I did that with a Mac! I expect
    most people do that with the iPhone and iPod. A timing diagram editor
    is not a complex tool. I should be able to draw simple waveforms
    without learning a complex interface. I currently use Visio and I
    find that to be a burdensome tool for simple things. It also has its
    own ways in which it doesn't work. I just wanted something a bit
    simpler.


    > (Not that a specification for the medical industry couldn't be more
    > generally useful, but it seems unlikely to cover complex drawing tools)


    I agree. I'm not sure why you mention this, but it sounds right.

    Do you know of a common denominator for tools with graphical
    interfaces?

    BTW, as long as I am ragging on the world of software. I don't like
    excessive movements of the mouse and switching back and forth with the
    keyboard. One of the things I have done to minimize movements is to
    move my windows toolbar to the top of the screen next to the menu of
    most programs. I find this so much easier to use than dragging the
    mouse around from top to bottom of the screen when I want to select
    between programs (which I seem to do a lot).

    The problem is that *many* programs (including Visio) don't understand
    that the windows toolbar is at the top now. New windows open with the
    title bar at the top of the screen, under the toolbar. Worse, some
    programs remember that they were at the top of screen, but remember it
    correctly (as being X pixels above the visible edge). Then when they
    restart incorrectly (or the dialog is reopened) the window is that
    much *more* off the top of the screen!!! With those applications I
    have to drag them well back onto the visible screen and try to
    remember to drag them back toward the middle before I close when they
    start drifting off the top again.

    Is it time to start cutting off fingers of programmers who continually
    mess up things like this? After a few mistakes they will be much less
    proficient at pumping out code (producing fewer bad programs) and
    after 10 mistakes... well I guess they could still type with their
    noses... 8^*

    Just a thought...

    Rick

    PS I am currently struggling with the Aldec simulator which has it's
    own set of problems. I'm actually here to complain about that, but
    I'll do it in another thread.
     
    rickman, Jun 5, 2008
    #8
  9. timinganalyzer

    Robert Miles Guest

    "rickman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    [snip]
    > Independant of the UI issues, a program really shouldn't crash when it
    > reads a data file... of any nature. Of course that is a theoretical
    > goal and can be difficult to achieve in practice. But certainly
    > crashing on startup without visible error messages is not a good thing
    > either. I had to start it from a DOS box to get anything useful from
    > it... maybe that is more of a Java issue... and don't get me started
    > complaining about Java. Does *anything* written in Java actually
    > work?
    >

    I suggest that any program for Windows Vista that uses Java should
    start with a check to see if Java is even installed, and if so, whether
    the version installed is suitable for what the program needs. My version
    of Vista came without Java, and the Microsoft version is no longer
    available. I installed the Sun version, but still have problems with
    getting
    all the programs that use Java to run correctly.

    http://www.java.com/en/
     
    Robert Miles, Jun 5, 2008
    #9
  10. timinganalyzer

    KJ Guest

    On Jun 5, 9:14 am, Brian Drummond <>
    wrote:
    > On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 12:44:03 -0700 (PDT), rickman <>
    >
    > Do you work in the NHS, or for one of their equipment suppliers?
    > All the CUI references (includinghttp://www.mscui.net/seem to be
    > associated with the health care sector.
    >

    I think what rickman was trying to remember was the 'Common User
    Access' or 'CUA' developed by IBM.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_User_Access

    KJ
     
    KJ, Jun 5, 2008
    #10
  11. timinganalyzer

    Robert Miles Guest

    "Robert Miles" <> wrote in message
    news:_tU1k.736$...
    >
    > "rickman" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > [snip]
    >> Independant of the UI issues, a program really shouldn't crash when it
    >> reads a data file... of any nature. Of course that is a theoretical
    >> goal and can be difficult to achieve in practice. But certainly
    >> crashing on startup without visible error messages is not a good thing
    >> either. I had to start it from a DOS box to get anything useful from
    >> it... maybe that is more of a Java issue... and don't get me started
    >> complaining about Java. Does *anything* written in Java actually
    >> work?
    >>

    > I suggest that any program for Windows Vista that uses Java should
    > start with a check to see if Java is even installed, and if so, whether
    > the version installed is suitable for what the program needs. My version
    > of Vista came without Java, and the Microsoft version is no longer
    > available. I installed the Sun version, but still have problems with
    > getting
    > all the programs that use Java to run correctly.
    >
    > http://www.java.com/en/
    >

    When getting the URL for that last message, I noticed that Sun now has
    a version of Java newer than the one I had before, and decided to install
    this update. The Google Toolbar program is offered at the same site,
    so I thought I'd let you know that if you're using the Windows Mail
    program that comes with Vista, you should avoid installing the Google
    Toolbar program unless you want to see what problems it causes in
    Windows Mail, although it often doesn't cause them immediately.
    Web sites that offer to let you do Google searches don't cause the same
    problems.
     
    Robert Miles, Jun 5, 2008
    #11
  12. timinganalyzer

    KJ Guest

    On Jun 5, 9:14 am, Brian Drummond <>
    wrote:
    > On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 12:44:03 -0700 (PDT), rickman <>
    >
    > Do you work in the NHS, or for one of their equipment suppliers?
    > All the CUI references (includinghttp://www.mscui.net/seem to be
    > associated with the health care sector.
    >

    I think what rickman was trying to remember was the 'Common User
    Access' or 'CUA' developed by IBM.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_User_Access

    KJ
     
    KJ, Jun 5, 2008
    #12
  13. timinganalyzer

    rickman Guest

    On Jun 5, 12:53 pm, KJ <> wrote:
    > On Jun 5, 9:14 am, Brian Drummond <>
    > wrote:> On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 12:44:03 -0700 (PDT), rickman <>
    >
    > > Do you work in the NHS, or for one of their equipment suppliers?
    > > All the CUI references (includinghttp://www.mscui.net/seemto be
    > > associated with the health care sector.

    >
    > I think what rickman was trying to remember was the 'Common User
    > Access' or 'CUA' developed by IBM.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_User_Access
    >
    > KJ


    I had the initials right, but the name wrong. The wiki article you
    link to calls it...

    Windows Consistent User Interface standard (CUI),

    Notice the wiki note that

    CUA has never had significant impact on Unix terminal applications.

    That explains a lot of why people don't tend to migrate between
    Windows and *nix. I know that most open source programs that I have
    tried seemed to me to have a bizarre user interface. I know that I am
    more sensitive to this sort of thing than most people, but once I see
    something that works well, I really, really hate to go back to poor
    practices.

    For the most part any new program should try to emulate the UI of the
    other common programs out there, only altering features if it *really*
    has a positive impact.
     
    rickman, Jun 5, 2008
    #13
  14. On 2008-06-05, rickman <> wrote:
    > On Jun 5, 9:14 am, Brian Drummond <>
    > wrote:
    >>
    >> Do you work in the NHS, or for one of their equipment suppliers?
    >> All the CUI references (includinghttp://www.mscui.net/seem to be
    >> associated with the health care sector.

    >
    > I have no idea what you are talking about... I am an electronic
    > design engineer and have never worked in the health care sector. What
    > exactly is NHS? Is that a government agency or a company?


    NHS = National Health Service, the state run healthcare provider
    here in the UK. Unlike state healthcare provision in the US the
    NHS is fairly comprehensive and covers the entire population (paid
    for out of general taxation). As a result it is a massive organisation
    - it dwarfs the entire Ministry of Defence, for instance. ISTR it
    is Europe's biggest employer.

    > I'm really not trying to bash the tool. I expect there are those who
    > like it and use it. I have often wanted a good tool for drawing
    > waveforms and timing diagrams. But the very first and most important
    > feature is that it has to be easy and intuitive to use. I feel that I
    > should be able to sit down and use it without reading a manual or
    > taking a tutorial. Many years ago I did that with a Mac! I expect
    > most people do that with the iPhone and iPod. A timing diagram editor
    > is not a complex tool. I should be able to draw simple waveforms
    > without learning a complex interface. I currently use Visio and I
    > find that to be a burdensome tool for simple things. It also has its
    > own ways in which it doesn't work. I just wanted something a bit
    > simpler.


    Interesting that you mention Macs. For many years Apple have
    published user interface guidelines that document exactly how UIs
    should behave. I recall looking through the one for the Newton a
    few years ago and it was very prescriptive and quite forceful in
    places. I remember it was full of things like "This UI component
    has square corners. This other component has rounded corners. If
    you need to reimplement them for some reason you stick to those
    conventions or your users will be swamping your helpdesk with
    support enquiries." This might not give designers as much leeway
    to create "really cool" interfaces but I suspect it is more in
    tune with what many users actually want.

    This is also an area where Microsoft have completely lost the plot.
    Since Windows 95 every major release of Windows has been accompanied
    by a new interface. Applications are even worse - I don't know
    how many style of toolbar have been played with over the last 15
    years. Microsoft always make great play of the new interface but
    who exactly does it benefit? Users are forced to learn new interfaces
    every upgrade and application developers are forced to 'upgrade'
    their programs with the new UI or risk being considered outdated.

    The only people I can see benefiting are Microsoft themseleves (it
    provides a very obvious reason to upgrade, even if it does lack
    clear benefits) and hardware manufacturers (the upgrade needs newer
    faster hardware). For all the talk of enhancing the user's experience
    it seems obvious to me that MS don't give a shit about users. All
    that matters is ensuring that the revenue keeps coming in from
    repeated meaningless upgrades.

    --
    Andrew Smallshaw
     
    Andrew Smallshaw, Jun 5, 2008
    #14
  15. timinganalyzer

    David Brown Guest

    rickman wrote:
    > On Jun 5, 9:14 am, Brian Drummond <>
    > wrote:
    >> On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 12:44:03 -0700 (PDT), rickman <>
    >> wrote:

    <snip>
    >>> I spent about 5 minutes working with this program before I gave up.
    >>> My reason is not the problem posted below, but because of the user
    >>> interface decisions made. I don't know why every new program has to
    >>> reinvent something about the user interface. There is a standard call
    >>> Common User Interface (CUI) that is even documented by Microsoft,
    >>> IIRC.

    >> Do you work in the NHS, or for one of their equipment suppliers?
    >> All the CUI references (includinghttp://www.mscui.net/seem to be
    >> associated with the health care sector.

    >
    > I have no idea what you are talking about... I am an electronic
    > design engineer and have never worked in the health care sector. What
    > exactly is NHS? Is that a government agency or a company? BTW, I
    > typoed above "call" should have been "called". CUI is a windows
    > standard as far as I know. I guess maybe it is more general, but I
    > have only heard the term used in the context of Windows.
    >


    I'm guessing (from your time zone) that you're in the USA.

    The "NHS" is the British "National Health Service". To people from the
    UK, "medical", "health care", and "NHS" are synonymous - the private
    health care is a very small minority there (mostly for people who want
    to pay for comfier beds and better food, or vanity surgery).
     
    David Brown, Jun 6, 2008
    #15
  16. timinganalyzer

    Jack Guest

    On Jun 2, 2:58 pm, timinganalyzer <> wrote:

    > There are 3 editions planned. The Free Edition(FE), the Standard
    > Edition(SE),
    > and the Professional Edition(PE).
    >
    > You can download the Free Edition now and read all about the
    > TimingAnalyzer at:
    >
    > www.timing-diagrams.com
    >
    > Comments and feedback are welcome at
    >
    >


    Very, very interesting.

    Thanks

    Bye Jack
     
    Jack, Jun 6, 2008
    #16
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