Any bug/issue trackers written in Ruby?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by J. D., Dec 12, 2004.

  1. J. D.

    J. D. Guest

    J. D., Dec 12, 2004
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 03:37:21 +0900, J. D. <> wrote:
    > Are there any free bug/issue trackers written in Ruby?
    >
    > For comparison, Python has at least two really nice ones (trac and
    > roundup):
    >
    > http://www.edgewall.com/trac/
    > http://roundup.sourceforge.net/
    >
    > Even rubyonrails is using an issue-tracker written in Python (trac).
    > http://dev.rubyonrails.org/trac.cgi/wiki


    Not yet as far as I know. I do plan on creating a Ruby port of Bug
    Traction when I have more time, but at this moment, I simply don't
    have the time to work on it. I will seriously be looking at the
    available application frameworks when I do so (mostly for the
    database layer, as I'm reasonably happy with the presentation layer
    that I have for Ruwiki).

    -austin
    --
    Austin Ziegler *
    * Alternate:
    Austin Ziegler, Dec 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. J. D.

    Kent Sibilev Guest

    I've been working on bug tracking system for sometime. This is the URL
    of the demo version: http://bugtrack.homeunix.net. If you are
    interested, I can prepare the tar of the current source code.

    Cheers,
    Kent.
    On Dec 12, 2004, at 1:37 PM, J. D. wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Are there any free bug/issue trackers written in Ruby?
    >
    > For comparison, Python has at least two really nice ones (trac and
    > roundup):
    >
    > http://www.edgewall.com/trac/
    > http://roundup.sourceforge.net/
    >
    > Even rubyonrails is using an issue-tracker written in Python (trac).
    > http://dev.rubyonrails.org/trac.cgi/wiki
    >
    Kent Sibilev, Dec 13, 2004
    #3
  4. On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:17:58 +0900, Kent Sibilev <> wrote:
    > I've been working on bug tracking system for sometime. This is the URL
    > of the demo version: http://bugtrack.homeunix.net. If you are
    > interested, I can prepare the tar of the current source code.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Kent.
    >
    >


    Very nice! I understood the entire application without needing to
    think, and everything nicely laid out.

    A few glitches here and there, but mostly very smooth and functional.

    Do you plan on putting it up into RubyForge?

    Regards,
    Nick
    Nicholas Van Weerdenburg, Dec 13, 2004
    #4
  5. J. D.

    yyuu Guest

    Hi,

    On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 03:37:21 +0900, J. D. <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Are there any free bug/issue trackers written in Ruby?
    >
    > For comparison, Python has at least two really nice ones (trac and roundup):
    >
    > http://www.edgewall.com/trac/
    > http://roundup.sourceforge.net/
    >
    > Even rubyonrails is using an issue-tracker written in Python (trac).
    > http://dev.rubyonrails.org/trac.cgi/wiki
    >
    >


    I know a web-based bug tracking system named "Kagemai".

    - http://sourceforge.jp/projects/kagemai/
    - http://www.daifukuya.com/kagemai/ (Japanese)

    But all documents are written in Japanese.

    --
    yyuu <>
    RemDebuggerWiki -> http://www.mind.sccs.chukyo-u.ac.jp/~yyuu/rem/
    yyuu, Dec 13, 2004
    #5
  6. J. D.

    Kent Sibilev Guest

    Thanks. There are definitely a lot of things missing but I spent only
    two week of doing it. I probably should create a project on RubyForge.
    The only thing that I'm waiting for right now is for DHH to put up a
    new version of Rails 0.9. So I can upgrade it and use some of those
    shiny new features. :)

    Cheers,
    Kent.

    On Dec 13, 2004, at 1:00 AM, Nicholas Van Weerdenburg wrote:

    > On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:17:58 +0900, Kent Sibilev
    > <> wrote:
    >> I've been working on bug tracking system for sometime. This is the URL
    >> of the demo version: http://bugtrack.homeunix.net. If you are
    >> interested, I can prepare the tar of the current source code.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> Kent.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Very nice! I understood the entire application without needing to
    > think, and everything nicely laid out.
    >
    > A few glitches here and there, but mostly very smooth and functional.
    >
    > Do you plan on putting it up into RubyForge?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Nick
    >
    Kent Sibilev, Dec 13, 2004
    #6
  7. Hi --

    I used to celebrate every 10000th message on this list, but that
    started to be sort of pointless as the volume increased.

    However, I do wish to point out that Kent's message was #123456.

    As the messages mount, and numerological coolness grows scarcer, we
    should savor such moments.


    David

    --
    David A. Black
    David A. Black, Dec 14, 2004
    #7
  8. J. D.

    Lloyd Zusman Guest

    "David A. Black" <> writes:

    > Hi --
    >
    > I used to celebrate every 10000th message on this list, but that
    > started to be sort of pointless as the volume increased.
    >
    > However, I do wish to point out that Kent's message was #123456.
    >
    > As the messages mount, and numerological coolness grows scarcer, we
    > should savor such moments.


    Well, there will be some lovely moments in another 148,372 and 190,703
    messages (after #123456).


    --
    Lloyd Zusman

    God bless you.
    Lloyd Zusman, Dec 14, 2004
    #8
  9. J. D.

    James Britt Guest

    David A. Black wrote:
    > Hi --
    >
    > I used to celebrate every 10000th message on this list, but that
    > started to be sort of pointless as the volume increased.
    >
    > However, I do wish to point out that Kent's message was #123456.
    >
    > As the messages mount, and numerological coolness grows scarcer, we
    > should savor such moments.


    So, do you have a Ruby app that parses each message number and examines
    it for extra numerical flavor?



    James
    James Britt, Dec 14, 2004
    #9
  10. Hi --

    On Tue, 14 Dec 2004, James Britt wrote:

    > David A. Black wrote:
    >> Hi --
    >>
    >> I used to celebrate every 10000th message on this list, but that
    >> started to be sort of pointless as the volume increased.
    >>
    >> However, I do wish to point out that Kent's message was #123456.
    >>
    >> As the messages mount, and numerological coolness grows scarcer, we
    >> should savor such moments.

    >
    > So, do you have a Ruby app that parses each message number and examines it
    > for extra numerical flavor?


    No -- in this case I happened to notice because I was discussing
    another message by number and noticed that it was slightly over
    123456. In the old days it was easier since the numbers were in the
    subjects :)


    David

    --
    David A. Black
    David A. Black, Dec 14, 2004
    #10
  11. Lloyd Zusman ha scritto:
    > "David A. Black" <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>Hi --
    >>
    >>I used to celebrate every 10000th message on this list, but that
    >>started to be sort of pointless as the volume increased.
    >>
    >>However, I do wish to point out that Kent's message was #123456.
    >>
    >>As the messages mount, and numerological coolness grows scarcer, we
    >>should savor such moments.

    >
    >
    > Well, there will be some lovely moments in another 148,372 and 190,703
    > messages (after #123456).


    well, Im waiting for 131.072 and 150.000. Worth noting that ruby-core is
    approaching 4000, get the jackpot by sending patrches for the open bugs ;)
    gabriele renzi, Dec 14, 2004
    #11
  12. On Tue, Dec 14, 2004 at 01:45:04PM +0900, David A. Black wrote:
    > Hi --
    >
    > On Tue, 14 Dec 2004, James Britt wrote:
    >
    > >David A. Black wrote:
    > >>Hi --
    > >>
    > >>I used to celebrate every 10000th message on this list, but that
    > >>started to be sort of pointless as the volume increased.
    > >>
    > >>However, I do wish to point out that Kent's message was #123456.
    > >>
    > >>As the messages mount, and numerological coolness grows scarcer, we
    > >>should savor such moments.

    > >
    > >So, do you have a Ruby app that parses each message number and examines it
    > >for extra numerical flavor?

    >
    > No -- in this case I happened to notice because I was discussing
    > another message by number and noticed that it was slightly over
    > 123456. In the old days it was easier since the numbers were in the
    > subjects :)
    >


    For your enjoyment:

    (.muttrc)

    ignore *
    unignore from: date subject to cc
    unignore organization organisation x-mailer: x-newsreader:
    x-mailing-list:
    unignore posted-to:
    unignore X-Bogosity:
    unignore X-Mail-Count:
    ^---- that's it.

    :)

    //Anders


    --
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Anders Engström
    http://www.gnejs.net PGP-Key: ED010E7F
    [Your mind is like an umbrella. It doesn't work unless you open it.]
    Anders Engström, Dec 14, 2004
    #12
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