Any tips?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Richard, Aug 15, 2009.

  1. Richard

    Richard Guest

    I have been searching for a newspaper type script (canned with the potential
    for mods). I can't believe there are none available. I have been to many
    sites offering them with almost comical results. The best is when the demo
    fails. OK - like I am spending my money with people who don't care about
    their own image!!! Then therre are sites which are so poorly written I can't
    uderstand what they are selling and how to buy it. A simple description: you
    are buying .... and the price $X.XX would be nice.

    One decent place I found - offered a variety of canned stuff and had a
    yearly access fee - and did explain what and how (and I looked at hundreds
    of sites) - now has issues with the site - can't download - links are
    screwed up. I get that these are usually part time gigs - and rather
    appreciate the idea (since no one can do it full time and make a living at
    it without a greated cost) but it would be nice to see some decent
    offerings.

    Does ANYONE know of a decent turnkey script seller - decent stuff, site that
    works, readable, and less than $500.00 would be nice.

    Thanks for any tips.
    Richard, Aug 15, 2009
    #1
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  2. Richard

    John Hosking Guest

    On Sat, 15 Aug 2009 13:57:32 -0400, Richard wrote:

    > I have been searching for a newspaper type script...


    >
    > Thanks for any tips.


    I just spent time on your query over in a.w.w. Please don't multi-post.

    --
    John
    John Hosking, Aug 15, 2009
    #2
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  3. Richard wrote:
    > I have been searching for a newspaper type script (canned with the potential
    > for mods). I can't believe there are none available.


    What is a "newspaper type script"?
    Harlan Messinger, Aug 16, 2009
    #3
  4. Richard

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Harlan Messinger <> wrote:

    > Richard wrote:
    > > I have been searching for a newspaper type script (canned with the potential
    > > for mods). I can't believe there are none available.

    >
    > What is a "newspaper type script"?


    I imagine that it is a script that looks at a mob of paragraphs and
    makes them into narrowish columns and wraps text from col to col. Like a
    newspaper but cleverer because the reader gets to be able determine the
    size of the page and the font.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Aug 16, 2009
    #4
  5. Richard

    Gus Richter Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Harlan Messinger <> wrote:
    >
    >> Richard wrote:
    >>> I have been searching for a newspaper type script (canned with the potential
    >>> for mods). I can't believe there are none available.

    >> What is a "newspaper type script"?

    >
    > I imagine that it is a script that looks at a mob of paragraphs and
    > makes them into narrowish columns and wraps text from col to col. Like a
    > newspaper but cleverer because the reader gets to be able determine the
    > size of the page and the font.



    If so, then check out this example at this Blog:
    <http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roc/archives/2009/07/on_not_being_ev.html>
    Using either: Firefox, Safari or Chrome

    Change the font-size (zoom) on any of them to see the number of columns
    change.
    All other browsers present only one column.

    Here are the Mozilla and Webkit rules in the stylesheet for that Blog.

    ..columns {
    -moz-column-width: 20em;
    -moz-column-gap: 3em;
    -moz-column-rule: medium solid;
    -webkit-column-width: 20em;
    -webkit-column-gap: 3em;
    -webkit-column-rule: medium solid; }

    Multi-Column Layout (CSS3):
    <http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-multicol/>

    --
    Gus
    Gus Richter, Aug 16, 2009
    #5
  6. Richard

    dorayme Guest

    In article <h68fos$fk7$-september.org>,
    Gus Richter <> wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > Harlan Messinger <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Richard wrote:
    > >>> I have been searching for a newspaper type script (canned with the
    > >>> potential
    > >>> for mods). I can't believe there are none available.
    > >> What is a "newspaper type script"?

    > >
    > > I imagine that it is a script that looks at a mob of paragraphs and
    > > makes them into narrowish columns and wraps text from col to col. Like a
    > > newspaper but cleverer because the reader gets to be able determine the
    > > size of the page and the font.

    >
    >
    > If so, then check out this example at this Blog:
    > <http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roc/archives/2009/07/on_not_being_ev.html>
    > Using either: Firefox, Safari or Chrome
    >
    > Change the font-size (zoom) on any of them to see the number of columns
    > change.
    > All other browsers present only one column.
    >
    > Here are the Mozilla and Webkit rules in the stylesheet for that Blog.
    >
    > .columns {
    > -moz-column-width: 20em;
    > -moz-column-gap: 3em;
    > -moz-column-rule: medium solid;
    > -webkit-column-width: 20em;
    > -webkit-column-gap: 3em;
    > -webkit-column-rule: medium solid; }
    >
    > Multi-Column Layout (CSS3):
    > <http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-multicol/>


    Yes, the columns are nice to read. Mac Safari and iCab also render it as
    meant (though iCab's face scowls at various things to do with the last
    rules you mention... (to mention the relevant ones). Mac Opera, no dice
    but as you say, one col. FF reports errors with CSS but, like iCab,
    supports these renderings...

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Aug 16, 2009
    #6
  7. Richard

    Gus Richter Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article <h68fos$fk7$-september.org>,
    > Gus Richter <> wrote:
    >
    >> dorayme wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Harlan Messinger <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Richard wrote:
    >>>>> I have been searching for a newspaper type script (canned with the
    >>>>> potential
    >>>>> for mods). I can't believe there are none available.
    >>>> What is a "newspaper type script"?
    >>> I imagine that it is a script that looks at a mob of paragraphs and
    >>> makes them into narrowish columns and wraps text from col to col. Like a
    >>> newspaper but cleverer because the reader gets to be able determine the
    >>> size of the page and the font.

    >>
    >> If so, then check out this example at this Blog:
    >> <http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roc/archives/2009/07/on_not_being_ev.html>
    >> Using either: Firefox, Safari or Chrome
    >>
    >> Change the font-size (zoom) on any of them to see the number of columns
    >> change.
    >> All other browsers present only one column.
    >>
    >> Here are the Mozilla and Webkit rules in the stylesheet for that Blog.
    >>
    >> .columns {
    >> -moz-column-width: 20em;
    >> -moz-column-gap: 3em;
    >> -moz-column-rule: medium solid;
    >> -webkit-column-width: 20em;
    >> -webkit-column-gap: 3em;
    >> -webkit-column-rule: medium solid; }
    >>
    >> Multi-Column Layout (CSS3):
    >> <http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-multicol/>

    >
    > Yes, the columns are nice to read. Mac Safari and iCab also render it as
    > meant (though iCab's face scowls at various things to do with the last
    > rules you mention... (to mention the relevant ones). Mac Opera, no dice
    > but as you say, one col. FF reports errors with CSS but, like iCab,
    > supports these renderings...



    Keep in mind that Multi-Column Layout (CSS3) is only a "Draft" proposal
    and only on "Last Call" prior to becoming "Candidate Recommendation",
    then "Proposed Recommendation", on the road to a "Final Recommendation".

    Prior to Recommendation, the specs may change and therefore
    implementations of Multi-column Layout are only experimental and
    indicated as such by the prefix to the properties; -moz- for browsers
    using Gecko and -webkit- for those using the Apple/Mac engine. The idea
    being that once the properties are part of a Recommendation, they will
    give support to the properties without the experimental prefix notation.

    I assume that you meant that the "W3C CSS Validator" reports CSS errors
    and not "FF". This is understandable since in reality those properties
    do not as yet exist without the experimental prefix in the Validator,
    presumably only after Recommendation and never for the property with prefix.

    --
    Gus
    Gus Richter, Aug 16, 2009
    #7
  8. Richard

    dorayme Guest

    In article <h697h2$uhn$-september.org>,
    Gus Richter <> wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:
    > > In article <h68fos$fk7$-september.org>,
    > > Gus Richter <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> dorayme wrote:


    > >>
    > >> .columns {
    > >> -moz-column-width: 20em;
    > >> -moz-column-gap: 3em;
    > >> -moz-column-rule: medium solid;
    > >> -webkit-column-width: 20em;
    > >> -webkit-column-gap: 3em;
    > >> -webkit-column-rule: medium solid; }
    > >>
    > >> Multi-Column Layout (CSS3):
    > >> <http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-multicol/>

    > >
    > > Yes, the columns are nice to read. Mac Safari and iCab also render it as
    > > meant (though iCab's face scowls at various things to do with the last
    > > rules you mention... (to mention the relevant ones). Mac Opera, no dice
    > > but as you say, one col. FF reports errors with CSS but, like iCab,
    > > supports these renderings...

    >
    >
    > Keep in mind that Multi-Column Layout (CSS3) is only a "Draft" proposal
    > and only on "Last Call" prior to becoming "Candidate Recommendation",
    > then "Proposed Recommendation", on the road to a "Final Recommendation".
    >
    > Prior to Recommendation, the specs may change and therefore
    > implementations of Multi-column Layout are only experimental and
    > indicated as such by the prefix to the properties; -moz- for browsers
    > using Gecko and -webkit- for those using the Apple/Mac engine. The idea
    > being that once the properties are part of a Recommendation, they will
    > give support to the properties without the experimental prefix notation.
    >
    > I assume that you meant that the "W3C CSS Validator" reports CSS errors
    > and not "FF". This is understandable since in reality those properties
    > do not as yet exist without the experimental prefix in the Validator,
    > presumably only after Recommendation and never for the property with prefix.


    Yes, I also sort of meant (but did not properly construct the sentence
    to say) that iCab too reports errors. With FF it is via the W3C direct
    (you know) but with iCab it is sort of its own heart and conscience
    speaking. That's how I see it. Others would see it as having its own
    internal CSS and HTML validator. I thought not to go into it.

    Anyway, I hope they implement these things. I like them. How long must
    it take to establish that some things like this are safe and degrade
    fine? Surely it is more definite than how long is a piece of string!

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Aug 16, 2009
    #8
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