Armenian - PHP and MySQL

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Adrienne Boswell, Aug 24, 2008.

  1. I have a client, Wonder Years Child Care Center, that would like to include
    some Armenian text on the site. I might want to add this text to a field
    in a MySQL database, to be output to the page, or the text could just be on
    a PHP page with includes, menu, header, etc.

    What is the best way to do this? TIA.

    If anyone wants to take a look at the site, it's at
    [http://mywonderyears.org/general.php?pic=27#pic27]. The little boy with
    the orange shirt is my son, Spane.

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    Adrienne Boswell, Aug 24, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Adrienne Boswell

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    On Aug 23, 8:12 pm, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    > I have a client, Wonder Years Child Care Center, that would like to include
    > some Armenian text on the site.  I might want to add this text to a field
    > in a MySQL database, to be output to the page, or the text could just be on
    > a PHP page with includes, menu, header, etc.
    >
    > What is the best way to do this?  TIA.
    >


    That is what unicode is for. However likely some would not be unicode
    enabled or know how to do so.

    Looking at the site, the text seems to be fairly concise. If one wants
    to add just a bit of Armenian, I would use the gd extension of php to
    produce an image of the Armenian text. You would have to first find an
    Armenian font you like and download it. Then you would use that font
    set and php gd to make a small transparent image, such as a png, just
    large enough to hold the text. If you just use text and the image is
    not huge, the png can be fairly small in byte size and likely will not
    slow your site down enough to matter.

    But concerning what is best, that depends on what resources you have
    and how you best like to code. You likely could do this in many ways.



    > If anyone wants to take a look at the site, it's at
    > [http://mywonderyears.org/general.php?pic=27#pic27].  The little boy with
    > the orange shirt is my son, Spane.
    >
    > --
    > Adrienne Boswell at Home
    > Arbpen Web Site Design Serviceshttp://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    > Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    cwdjrxyz, Aug 24, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Adrienne Boswell wrote:

    > I have a client, Wonder Years Child Care Center, that would like to
    > include some Armenian text on the site. I might want to add this
    > text to a field in a MySQL database, to be output to the page, or the
    > text could just be on a PHP page with includes, menu, header, etc.


    I guess the first problem here is that PHP still does not support Unicode.
    But you could present the Armenian text using character references;
    hopefully PHP will act as ignorant of them, i.e. just pass them forward to
    browsers. I would use a utility like BabelPad,
    http://www.babelstone.co.uk/Software/BabelPad.html
    to convert text into such a format, so that it would be rather smooth as
    soon as you have BabelPad installed.

    There's the additional problem that people may still use systems that lack
    any font with Armenian letters, or an old browser (IE 6 or older) that is
    not able to change font automatically when needed. You can try to alleviate
    the problems by using e.g.
    font-family: Arial Unicode MS, Lucida Sans Unicode
    in CSS for the Armenian text, since then even an old browser might be able
    to use a font that contains the characters. This is somewhat doubtful though
    since e.g. the two fonts above have rather different characteristics, so if
    one of them fits your overall design, the other probably won't do that very
    well. Actually I might go for the more commonly available font only:
    font-family: Lucida Sans Unicode
    On systems that lack this font (typically, non-Windows systems), we just
    have to hope that the browser is bright enough to use some other font in the
    system that will do, and this usually works.

    Yucca
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Aug 24, 2008
    #3
  4. I wrote:

    > Actually I might go for the
    > more commonly available font only: font-family: Lucida Sans Unicode


    Oops. Although Lucida Sans Unicode seems to have Armenian letters on the
    system I'm using now, it apparently hasn't got them - I'm seeing characters
    from a replacement font (probably Sylfaen). According to
    http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/0531/fontsupport.htm
    (which is fairly up-to-date), the only font that contains Armenian letters
    and that you can expect to find on an average user's system is Arial Unicode
    MS. It comes with Microsoft Office, so it's fairly commonly available, but
    far from universal.

    Yucca
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Aug 24, 2008
    #4
  5. ..oO(Jukka K. Korpela)

    >Adrienne Boswell wrote:
    >
    >> I have a client, Wonder Years Child Care Center, that would like to
    >> include some Armenian text on the site. I might want to add this
    >> text to a field in a MySQL database, to be output to the page, or the
    >> text could just be on a PHP page with includes, menu, header, etc.

    >
    >I guess the first problem here is that PHP still does not support Unicode.


    There's no native support yet (comes with PHP 6), but you can already
    work very well with PHP and Unicode. The only thing to keep in mind is
    that the string functions work on bytes instead of characters. But with
    the Multibyte extension this issue can be solved quite conveniently.

    >But you could present the Armenian text using character references;


    Not necessary.

    Micha
     
    Michael Fesser, Aug 24, 2008
    #5
  6. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed "Jukka K. Korpela"
    <> writing in
    news:cxcsk.55002$:

    > Adrienne Boswell wrote:
    >
    >> I have a client, Wonder Years Child Care Center, that would like to
    >> include some Armenian text on the site. I might want to add this
    >> text to a field in a MySQL database, to be output to the page, or the
    >> text could just be on a PHP page with includes, menu, header, etc.

    >
    > I guess the first problem here is that PHP still does not support
    > Unicode. But you could present the Armenian text using character
    > references; hopefully PHP will act as ignorant of them, i.e. just pass
    > them forward to browsers.


    Thank you, Jukka.

    It would be great if y'all could test
    [http://mywonderyears.org/links.php]. The link after Character and
    Ethics Project should be in Armenian with Armenian characters.

    I have EditPad lite installed on my system, and it has the option to
    convert text. I have found that if I convert the PHP file, the data
    coming out of the db will come out correctly. Since I don't speak or
    read Armenian, I am looking at Armenian/English sites to compare test
    phrases, and it seems to be working fine - in Opera, IE7, IE6, IE5,
    Safari, and Firefox - all on Windows XP SP2.

    I am not really worried about users whose browsers cannot render
    Armenian text - those who are able to read Armenian will probably have
    their systems set up so they can see it/hear it - those without will not
    know what it says anyway (like me). I have lived in Glendale, CA (which
    has a large Armenian population) for 9 years, and I am just now
    beginning to learn the language - so far I can say three things, hello,
    yes and thank you. It's a beginning.

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    Adrienne Boswell, Aug 24, 2008
    #6
  7. Adrienne Boswell

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 24 Aug 2008, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:

    > It would be great if y'all could test
    > [http://mywonderyears.org/links.php]. The link after Character and
    > Ethics Project should be in Armenian with Armenian characters.


    If it looks like a cross between Greek and Hebrew, I got it. -Even in "View
    Source" firefox 3.

    > I am not really worried about users whose browsers cannot render
    > Armenian text - those who are able to read Armenian will probably have
    > their systems set up so they can see it/hear it - those without will not
    > know what it says anyway (like me). I have lived in Glendale, CA (which
    > has a large Armenian population) for 9 years, and I am just now
    > beginning to learn the language - so far I can say three things, hello,
    > yes and thank you. It's a beginning.


    Watch out for the lycanthropists.

    --
    Neredbojias
    http://www.neredbojias.net/
    Great Sights and Sounds
    http://adult.neredbojias.net/ (adult)
     
    Neredbojias, Aug 24, 2008
    #7
  8. Adrienne Boswell

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    On Aug 24, 11:26 am, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:

    > It would be great if y'all could test
    > [http://mywonderyears.org/links.php].  The link after Character and
    > Ethics Project should be in Armenian with Armenian characters.


    The Armenian text works using the most recent versions of IE7,
    Firefox, Seamonkey, Flock, Opera, and Safari for Windows, all on the
    Windows XP OS sp3.

    I have a simulator for the very old WebTV box(not the newer MSNTV2
    one). It outputs text too, but it is nothing of this world - perhaps
    Martian :). There likely are very few of these very old boxes still
    being used, but Microsoft, the present owner, was still supporting
    them a year or two ago. These boxes were mostly used by seniors - the
    teens mostly departed many years ago, likely mainly because the boxes
    would not download music. Also the old Amaya browser complains about
    the xml not being well formed and offers to render as html. When you
    so choose you get blank boxes rather than Armenian characters. The old
    W3C Amaya browser was not used much by the general public and used
    mainly by those who wanted to test W3C code features not then
    supported by most commercial browsers.

    There are sites where you can get screen shots using several older and
    less common browsers, and using OSs other than Windows. I am guessing
    that your page will be seen correctly by most.
     
    cwdjrxyz, Aug 24, 2008
    #8
  9. cwdjrxyz wrote:

    > The Armenian text works using the most recent versions of IE7,
    > Firefox, Seamonkey, Flock, Opera, and Safari for Windows, all on the
    > Windows XP OS sp3.


    There's not much difference to be expected between them, as this is
    primarily a font issue.

    Regarding my previous note about fonts, I did not realize that Sylfaen is
    shipped with Windows XP and Vista, making it rather widespread. What really
    happens when you browse a page containing Armenian letters on Win XP or
    Vista is that the browser does not find those letters in the fonts suggested
    on the page, then checks the default fonts (as defined in browser settings)
    and probably does not find them there either; and then it finally uses its
    internal list of fonts and probably decides to use Sylfaen.

    There's the risk that IE 6 does not get this right, unless you help it by
    explicitly declaring Sylfaen for the Armenian text. It may fail the fallback
    part. Testing on IE 6 is far more important in this case than playing with
    Flock or Safari for example.

    The real problem would be people using older Windows systems. They probably
    don't have Sylfaen, but they quite often have Arial Unicode MS (since they
    have Office). This raises a problem because these fonts are rather
    different.

    Armenian letters are often smaller than Latin letters in the same font (for
    the same font size). For Sylfaen, they match the size and style of lowercase
    Latin letters rather well. However, if the copy text font is Arial or
    (gasp!) Verdana, Armenian letters look rather small when they have been
    taken from Sylfaen (as Arial and Verdana don't contain them). And if you
    combine Latin letters in Arial (or Arial Unicode MS) and Armenian letters in
    Arial Unicode MS, the size difference is so big that the effect is
    grotesque.

    Actually I would consider using Sylfaen as the primary font for all normal
    text if the text contains Armenian letters. It looks rather nice. When
    Sylfaen is not available, the browser's default font would be used of
    course, so maybe
    body { font-family: Sylfaen, Arial Unicode MS }
    would be a practical choice, but then the site would have to be tested using
    both fonts, as they are so different in their nature. Of course the site
    would have to be flexibly designed, not based on some font's specific
    properties.

    > Also the old Amaya browser complains about
    > the xml not being well formed and offers to render as html.


    Huh? The page http://mywonderyears.org/links.php is well-formed XML and it's
    also valid XHTML 1.0 Strict. There's little point in reporting Amaya
    problems - especially with old Amaya - anywhere outside the Amaya
    development people, if there still are some.

    > The old
    > W3C Amaya browser was not used much by the general public and used
    > mainly by those who wanted to test W3C code features not then
    > supported by most commercial browsers.


    So why confuse things by mentioning it at all?

    > There are sites where you can get screen shots using several older and
    > less common browsers, and using OSs other than Windows.


    I'm sceptic about such services especially since this is basically a font
    problem and we cannot really know how those services use fonts.

    Yucca
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Aug 24, 2008
    #9
  10. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed "Jukka K. Korpela"
    <> writing in
    news:apjsk.55171$:

    > cwdjrxyz wrote:
    >
    >> The Armenian text works using the most recent versions of IE7,
    >> Firefox, Seamonkey, Flock, Opera, and Safari for Windows, all on the
    >> Windows XP OS sp3.

    >
    > There's not much difference to be expected between them, as this is
    > primarily a font issue.
    >
    > Regarding my previous note about fonts, I did not realize that Sylfaen
    > is shipped with Windows XP and Vista, making it rather widespread.


    I didn't know that either.

    >
    > There's the risk that IE 6 does not get this right, unless you help it
    > by explicitly declaring Sylfaen for the Armenian text. It may fail the
    > fallback part. Testing on IE 6 is far more important in this case than
    > playing with Flock or Safari for example.


    I've tested it on IE6, and it seems to be fine.

    >
    > The real problem would be people using older Windows systems. They
    > probably don't have Sylfaen, but they quite often have Arial Unicode
    > MS (since they have Office). This raises a problem because these fonts
    > are rather different.


    Yes, they certainly are. Sylfaen is much larger than Arial Unicode.

    >
    > Armenian letters are often smaller than Latin letters in the same font
    > (for the same font size).


    We could go on... it's bad enough that "web deezinerz" use tiny font
    sized, imagine what would happen if they got a hold of Armenian? Oh,
    the humanity!

    > For Sylfaen, they match the size and style
    > of lowercase Latin letters rather well. However, if the copy text font
    > is Arial or (gasp!) Verdana, Armenian letters look rather small when
    > they have been taken from Sylfaen (as Arial and Verdana don't contain
    > them). And if you combine Latin letters in Arial (or Arial Unicode MS)
    > and Armenian letters in Arial Unicode MS, the size difference is so
    > big that the effect is grotesque.


    Yup.

    >
    > Actually I would consider using Sylfaen as the primary font for all
    > normal text if the text contains Armenian letters. It looks rather
    > nice. When Sylfaen is not available, the browser's default font would
    > be used of course, so maybe
    > body { font-family: Sylfaen, Arial Unicode MS }
    > would be a practical choice, but then the site would have to be tested
    > using both fonts, as they are so different in their nature. Of course
    > the site would have to be flexibly designed, not based on some font's
    > specific properties.


    I liked the Sylfaen font, so I changed the body to use it, with regular
    Arial and sans-serif as fallback. The .armenian class bumps the
    Armenian text to 105%, not too large of a difference for those with
    Sylfaen font, and large enough for the Arial Unicode MS people.

    >
    >> There are sites where you can get screen shots using several older
    >> and less common browsers, and using OSs other than Windows.

    >
    > I'm sceptic about such services especially since this is basically a
    > font problem and we cannot really know how those services use fonts.
    >


    I agree, and as I stated earlier, users who can read Armenian probably
    have systems that can handle it. I doubt if Sarkis Jr. would give
    Sarkis Sr. a web tv if it couldn't handle Armenian.

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    Adrienne Boswell, Aug 24, 2008
    #10
  11. Adrienne Boswell

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    On Aug 24, 4:40 pm, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    > Gazing into my crystal ball I observed "Jukka K. Korpela"
    > <> writing innews:apjsk.55171$:
    >
    > > cwdjrxyz wrote:

    >
    > >> The Armenian text works using the most recent versions of IE7,
    > >> Firefox, Seamonkey, Flock, Opera, and Safari for Windows, all on the
    > >> Windows XP OS sp3.

    >
    > > There's not much difference to be expected between them, as this is
    > > primarily a font issue.

    >
    > > Regarding my previous note about fonts, I did not realize that Sylfaen
    > > is shipped with Windows XP and Vista, making it rather widespread.

    >
    > I didn't know that either.
    >
    >
    >
    > > There's the risk that IE 6 does not get this right, unless you help it
    > > by explicitly declaring Sylfaen for the Armenian text. It may fail the
    > > fallback part. Testing on IE 6 is far more important in this case than
    > > playing with Flock or Safari for example.

    >
    > I've tested it on IE6, and it seems to be fine.
    >
    >
    >
    > > The real problem would be people using older Windows systems. They
    > > probably don't have Sylfaen, but they quite often have Arial Unicode
    > > MS (since they have Office). This raises a problem because these fonts
    > > are rather different.

    >
    > Yes, they certainly are.  Sylfaen is much larger than Arial Unicode.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Armenian letters are often smaller than Latin letters in the same font
    > > (for the same font size).

    >
    > We could go on... it's bad enough that "web deezinerz" use tiny font
    > sized, imagine what would happen if they got a hold of Armenian?  Oh,
    > the humanity!
    >
    > > For Sylfaen, they match the size and style
    > > of lowercase Latin letters rather well. However, if the copy text font
    > > is Arial or (gasp!) Verdana, Armenian letters look rather small when
    > > they have been taken from Sylfaen (as Arial and Verdana don't contain
    > > them). And if you combine Latin letters in Arial (or Arial Unicode MS)
    > > and Armenian letters in Arial Unicode MS, the size difference is so
    > > big that the effect is grotesque.

    >
    > Yup.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Actually I would consider using Sylfaen as the primary font for all
    > > normal text if the text contains Armenian letters. It looks rather
    > > nice. When Sylfaen is not available, the browser's default font would
    > > be used of course, so maybe
    > > body { font-family: Sylfaen, Arial Unicode MS }
    > > would be a practical choice, but then the site would have to be tested
    > > using both fonts, as they are so different in their nature. Of course
    > > the site would have to be flexibly designed, not based on some font's
    > > specific properties.

    >
    > I liked the Sylfaen font, so I changed the body to use it, with regular
    > Arial and sans-serif as fallback.  The .armenian class bumps the
    > Armenian text to 105%, not too large of a difference for those with
    > Sylfaen font, and large enough for the Arial Unicode MS people.
    >
    >
    >
    > >> There are sites where you can get screen shots using several older
    > >> and less common browsers, and using OSs other than Windows.

    >
    > > I'm sceptic about such services especially since this is basically a
    > > font problem and we cannot really know how those services use fonts.

    >
    > I agree, and as I stated earlier, users who can read Armenian probably
    > have systems that can handle it.  I doubt if Sarkis Jr. would give
    > Sarkis Sr. a web tv if it couldn't handle Armenian.



    Earlier in this thread I mentioned that you could use the gd extension
    to make a transparent png of just about any text you wish. I wanted to
    show how easy it is to do with a specific example. Go to
    http://www.cwdjr.net/php/ttfAS.php and view the text for the gd php
    code at http://www.cwdjr.net/php/ttfAS.php.txt . Also you need a font
    file for the old Anglo Saxon font loaded on the server. Notice that
    you can write the text at any angle, if desired. To get an actual png,
    you can right click the image and select to download to your computer.
    But make sure to change the extension to png rather than php before or
    after you download. The 800 x 400 transparent png for this text image
    is only about 10 KB, and you could put a lot more text of more normal
    size in the same area. But you do not even have to download the image
    at all. See http://www.cwdjr.net/php/ttfAStestpage.php . Right click
    and view the source code and note the address of the image which is
    the gd php image file we generated before and is called to bring up
    the image. The advantage of this method is that you do not have to
    worry what fonts a viewing browser might support, although for your
    application this seems to be no great problem. I viewed the page on
    all of the browsers mentioned before, and all worked fine. Thus even
    Sarkis Sr. could view Armenian text on an old WebTV if he wanted
    to :). If you had viewers with very old browsers for which png does
    not work, you could use gif instead. Of course people can turn images
    off, so one might need to state that images must be turned on to see
    the Armenian.
     
    cwdjrxyz, Aug 25, 2008
    #11
  12. Adrienne Boswell

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    cwdjrxyz, Aug 25, 2008
    #12
  13. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed cwdjrxyz <>
    writing in
    news::

    > On Aug 24, 4:40 pm, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    >> Gazing into my crystal ball I observed "Jukka K. Korpela"
    >> <> writing
    >> innews:apjsk.55171$

    > unalahti.fi:
    >>
    >> > cwdjrxyz wrote:

    >>
    >> >> The Armenian text works using the most recent versions of IE7,
    >> >> Firefox, Seamonkey, Flock, Opera, and Safari for Windows, all on
    >> >> the Windows XP OS sp3.

    >>
    >> > There's not much difference to be expected between them, as this is
    >> > primarily a font issue.

    >>
    >> > Regarding my previous note about fonts, I did not realize that
    >> > Sylfaen is shipped with Windows XP and Vista, making it rather
    >> > widespread.

    >>
    >> I didn't know that either.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > There's the risk that IE 6 does not get this right, unless you help
    >> > it by explicitly declaring Sylfaen for the Armenian text. It may
    >> > fail the fallback part. Testing on IE 6 is far more important in
    >> > this case than playing with Flock or Safari for example.

    >>
    >> I've tested it on IE6, and it seems to be fine.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > The real problem would be people using older Windows systems. They
    >> > probably don't have Sylfaen, but they quite often have Arial
    >> > Unicode MS (since they have Office). This raises a problem because
    >> > these fonts are rather different.

    >>
    >> Yes, they certainly are.  Sylfaen is much larger than Arial Unicode.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > Armenian letters are often smaller than Latin letters in the same
    >> > font (for the same font size).

    >>
    >> We could go on... it's bad enough that "web deezinerz" use tiny font
    >> sized, imagine what would happen if they got a hold of Armenian?  Oh,
    >> the humanity!
    >>
    >> > For Sylfaen, they match the size and style
    >> > of lowercase Latin letters rather well. However, if the copy text
    >> > font is Arial or (gasp!) Verdana, Armenian letters look rather
    >> > small when they have been taken from Sylfaen (as Arial and Verdana
    >> > don't contain them). And if you combine Latin letters in Arial (or
    >> > Arial Unicode MS) and Armenian letters in Arial Unicode MS, the
    >> > size difference is so big that the effect is grotesque.

    >>
    >> Yup.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > Actually I would consider using Sylfaen as the primary font for all
    >> > normal text if the text contains Armenian letters. It looks rather
    >> > nice. When Sylfaen is not available, the browser's default font
    >> > would be used of course, so maybe
    >> > body { font-family: Sylfaen, Arial Unicode MS }
    >> > would be a practical choice, but then the site would have to be
    >> > tested using both fonts, as they are so different in their nature.
    >> > Of course the site would have to be flexibly designed, not based on
    >> > some font's specific properties.

    >>
    >> I liked the Sylfaen font, so I changed the body to use it, with
    >> regular Arial and sans-serif as fallback.  The .armenian class bumps
    >> the Armenian text to 105%, not too large of a difference for those
    >> with Sylfaen font, and large enough for the Arial Unicode MS people.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> >> There are sites where you can get screen shots using several older
    >> >> and less common browsers, and using OSs other than Windows.

    >>
    >> > I'm sceptic about such services especially since this is basically
    >> > a font problem and we cannot really know how those services use
    >> > fonts.

    >>
    >> I agree, and as I stated earlier, users who can read Armenian
    >> probably have systems that can handle it.  I doubt if Sarkis Jr.
    >> would give Sarkis Sr. a web tv if it couldn't handle Armenian.

    >
    >
    > Earlier in this thread I mentioned that you could use the gd extension
    > to make a transparent png of just about any text you wish. I wanted to
    > show how easy it is to do with a specific example. Go to
    > http://www.cwdjr.net/php/ttfAS.php and view the text for the gd php
    > code at http://www.cwdjr.net/php/ttfAS.php.txt . Also you need a font
    > file for the old Anglo Saxon font loaded on the server. Notice that
    > you can write the text at any angle, if desired. To get an actual png,
    > you can right click the image and select to download to your computer.
    > But make sure to change the extension to png rather than php before or
    > after you download. The 800 x 400 transparent png for this text image
    > is only about 10 KB, and you could put a lot more text of more normal
    > size in the same area. But you do not even have to download the image
    > at all. See http://www.cwdjr.net/php/ttfAStestpage.php . Right click
    > and view the source code and note the address of the image which is
    > the gd php image file we generated before and is called to bring up
    > the image. The advantage of this method is that you do not have to
    > worry what fonts a viewing browser might support, although for your
    > application this seems to be no great problem. I viewed the page on
    > all of the browsers mentioned before, and all worked fine. Thus even
    > Sarkis Sr. could view Armenian text on an old WebTV if he wanted
    > to :). If you had viewers with very old browsers for which png does
    > not work, you could use gif instead. Of course people can turn images
    > off, so one might need to state that images must be turned on to see
    > the Armenian.
    >


    I saw the text page, and will keep it as a snippet for the future.
    Thank you.

    However, I never did see the image. As I finished this sentence, my
    browser still has not rendered it. I am on high speed cable, tried with
    both Opera and IE - IE gave up with a not available error, and Opera I
    think is still trying.

    I think I am going to be just fine with text. I want search engines to
    be able to index it, so I think that images are not going to be a good
    way to go.

    Opera is still trying... oh heck, I'm going to take it out of it's
    misery.

    Again, thanks for the code, and thanks for looking.


    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    Adrienne Boswell, Aug 25, 2008
    #13
  14. Adrienne Boswell

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    On Aug 25, 3:17 am, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:

    > However, I never did see the image. As I finished this sentence, my
    > browser still has not rendered it.  I am on high speed cable, tried with
    > both Opera and IE - IE gave up with a not available error, and Opera I
    > think is still trying.


    I don't know why you do not see the image nearly at once. I just
    checked with several browsers including IE and Opera that you used,
    and the image popped up nearly at once on Windows XP sp3 connected
    with ATT/Yahoo DSL Elite with usually about 5 Mbps download speed. The
    site could have been down or very slow, but it very seldom is. Let me
    know if you continue to be unable to see the image. I have recently
    moved to a new server at the same host so that I could upgrade from
    php 4 to php 5, but of course this should have nothing to do with the
    viewing browser. Some security programs now block linking from one
    domain to another that is not on the same server, but that is not the
    case here - everything is on the same domain.
     
    cwdjrxyz, Aug 25, 2008
    #14
  15. Adrienne Boswell

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    On Aug 25, 3:56 am, cwdjrxyz <> wrote:
    > On Aug 25, 3:17 am, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    >
    > > However, I never did see the image. As I finished this sentence, my
    > > browser still has not rendered it.  I am on high speed cable, tried with
    > > both Opera and IE - IE gave up with a not available error, and Opera I
    > > think is still trying.

    >
    > I don't know why you do not see the image nearly at once. I just
    > checked with several browsers including IE and Opera that you used,
    > and the image popped up nearly at once on Windows XP sp3 connected
    > with ATT/Yahoo DSL Elite with usually about 5 Mbps download speed. The
    > site could have been down or very slow, but it very seldom is. Let me
    > know if you continue to be unable to see the image. I have recently
    > moved to a new server at the same host so that I could upgrade from
    > php 4 to php 5, but of course this should have nothing to do with the
    > viewing browser. Some security programs now block linking from one
    > domain to another that is not on the same server, but that is not the
    > case here - everything is on the same domain.


    I just checked the page http://www.cwdjr.net/php/ttfAS.php at
    http://browsershots.org/ using both IE 7 and Opera 9.52 using the
    Windows OS. Both screen shots are the same as I see on my browsers.
    Thus I am at a loss to know why you do not see the image unless it is
    just a temporary network problem.
     
    cwdjrxyz, Aug 25, 2008
    #15
  16. On 2008-08-24 18:26:59 +0200, Adrienne Boswell <> said:

    > [ ... ]


    > It would be great if y'all could test
    > [http://mywonderyears.org/links.php]. The link after Character and
    > Ethics Project should be in Armenian with Armenian characters.


    It works fine in MacOS 10.4 with either Safari or iCab. By "works fine"
    I mean the Armenian characters are certainly Armenian characters;
    whether they are the _right_ Armenian characters is, of course, another
    matter.

    --
    athel
     
    Athel Cornish-Bowden, Aug 25, 2008
    #16
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Ted Zeng
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    548
    Tim Arnold
    Oct 3, 2006
  2. Ted Zeng
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    664
    Ted Zeng
    Oct 13, 2006
  3. Adrienne Boswell
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    587
    nice.guy.nige
    Apr 26, 2009
  4. Rajive Narain
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,996
    Rajive Narain
    Sep 18, 2009
  5. neha shena
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    269
    Dennis Lee Bieber
    Oct 29, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page