Article on Ruby/Rails

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Tom Copeland, Jun 15, 2005.

  1. Tom Copeland

    Tom Copeland Guest

    Tom Copeland, Jun 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. Tom Copeland

    Tom Copeland Guest

    Tom Copeland, Jun 15, 2005
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  3. Tom Copeland

    James Britt Guest

    Tom Copeland wrote:
    > On Wed, 2005-06-15 at 17:12 -0400, Tom Copeland wrote:
    >
    >>David also did a Cerise article earlier this year:
    >>
    >>http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/wa-cerise.html

    >
    >
    > Er, no he didn't, that was Koen Vervloesem. Doh!


    But he *has* written a book on Python; it first struck me as an odd
    touch that the names in the address book were Pythonistas. Then I saw why.

    James

    --

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    James Britt, Jun 15, 2005
    #3
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    On Jun 15, 2005, at 3:12 PM, Tom Copeland wrote:
    > Hope this isn't a duplicate posting; there's an article by David Mertz
    > on Ruby+Rails on IBM devWorks here:


    Ruby on Rails also just got a bump in the JavaLobby newsletter out
    today. Rails excerpt follows:

    Ruby on Rails is a powerhouse
    I didn't get to spend much time at the No Fluff Just Stuff symposium
    here in Research Triangle Park this past weekend, but one noteworthy
    session I did get to attend was Dave Thomas' presentation about "Ruby
    on Rails." I was amazed as I sat through the 90-minute presentation
    watching Dave knock out feature after feature of a real-life web
    application in record time and with more compact code than any I had
    previously seen. The Rails developers seem to have carefully
    considered the recurring pattern needs of web apps, and the framework
    provides full functionality for a typical database-backed CRUD
    (create, read, update, delete) application in a matter of minutes.
    Rails uses intelligent reflection to map database tables to Ruby
    objects, and the apps you generate with the Rails scripts form a very
    reasonable foundation for extending and customizing to meet your
    specific needs. Unit testing is built-in by default, as is a full web
    server for testing and debugging. The next time you need to get the
    job done very quickly you may want to try out Ruby on Rails for
    yourself. I don't know enough yet to say how much it can scale, but
    Rails is quite clearly a major step forward for those who want web
    application development to be easier. Dave has a new book in beta,
    check it out here.

    --Apple-Mail-2-994247000--
     
    Gavin Kistner, Jun 16, 2005
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