ASP.Net 2.0: where do you keep login data ?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Jarod, Jan 11, 2006.

  1. Jarod

    Jarod Guest

    Hey
    I will be creating asp.net 2.0 application and I need to create whole
    database stuff... But I have to use SQL S2000 not 05. So first question do
    you use default provider ( AspNetSqlProvider or something like this in a
    real world applications ? )? What's best approach to keep user data I need
    to have a lot of data from users because I will need their names, phones,
    photos, some doc-files and so on. And up to know I kept it in one big table
    User. But now I can have a fresh start but what's best approach one big
    table seems ok for me because all this data are in one place. This default
    provider creates some tables for me, but don't ask about anything so... What
    would you suggest in my scenario ?
    Jarod
     
    Jarod, Jan 11, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jarod

    clintonG Guest

    Yes, use the default provider. Run aspnet_regsql on the database and the
    Membership tables will be created. These tables are used by the new 2.0
    controls. You can then use 2.0 Profiles defined in the web.config or build
    your own tables for unique properties such as phone numbers and so on by
    using a key to relate to the aspnet_Users table.

    Using Profiles is a trade-off as the data is not normalized and AFIK is
    retrieved every time a member logs in whether the data is needed or not but
    I have yet to learn if this can or can not be avoided.

    <%= Clinton Gallagher
    METROmilwaukee (sm) "A Regional Information Service"
    NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
    URL http://metromilwaukee.com/
    URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com/




    "Jarod" <> wrote in message
    news:Op%...
    > Hey
    > I will be creating asp.net 2.0 application and I need to create whole
    > database stuff... But I have to use SQL S2000 not 05. So first question do
    > you use default provider ( AspNetSqlProvider or something like this in a
    > real world applications ? )? What's best approach to keep user data I need
    > to have a lot of data from users because I will need their names, phones,
    > photos, some doc-files and so on. And up to know I kept it in one big
    > table User. But now I can have a fresh start but what's best approach one
    > big table seems ok for me because all this data are in one place. This
    > default provider creates some tables for me, but don't ask about anything
    > so... What would you suggest in my scenario ?
    > Jarod
     
    clintonG, Jan 11, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jarod,
    You can run the ASPNET_REGSQSL utility on a SQL Server 2000 database and it
    will created all the tables and stored procs to handle this.

    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229862.aspx

    Peter
    --
    Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    UnBlog:
    http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com




    "Jarod" wrote:

    > Hey
    > I will be creating asp.net 2.0 application and I need to create whole
    > database stuff... But I have to use SQL S2000 not 05. So first question do
    > you use default provider ( AspNetSqlProvider or something like this in a
    > real world applications ? )? What's best approach to keep user data I need
    > to have a lot of data from users because I will need their names, phones,
    > photos, some doc-files and so on. And up to know I kept it in one big table
    > User. But now I can have a fresh start but what's best approach one big
    > table seems ok for me because all this data are in one place. This default
    > provider creates some tables for me, but don't ask about anything so... What
    > would you suggest in my scenario ?
    > Jarod
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQnJvbWJlcmcgW0MjIE1WUF0=?=, Jan 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Jarod

    intrader Guest

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 20:39:33 +0100, Jarod wrote:

    > Hey
    > I will be creating asp.net 2.0 application and I need to create whole
    > database stuff... But I have to use SQL S2000 not 05. So first question do
    > you use default provider ( AspNetSqlProvider or something like this in a
    > real world applications ? )? What's best approach to keep user data I need
    > to have a lot of data from users because I will need their names, phones,
    > photos, some doc-files and so on. And up to know I kept it in one big table
    > User. But now I can have a fresh start but what's best approach one big
    > table seems ok for me because all this data are in one place. This default
    > provider creates some tables for me, but don't ask about anything so... What
    > would you suggest in my scenario ?
    > Jarod

    I recommend that you look into Application Blocks.
    One Application Block pertaining to security, passwords, etc. is

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnpag2/html/security1.asp
     
    intrader, Jan 11, 2006
    #4
  5. Jarod

    Jarod Guest

    > You can run the ASPNET_REGSQSL utility on a SQL Server 2000 database and
    > it
    > will created all the tables and stored procs to handle this.
    >
    > http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229862.aspx
    >


    I did it, but do I have to create SqlRoleProvider and SqlMembershipProvider
    in web.config ? Or is there another way ? Maybe some nice tool ?
    Jarod
     
    Jarod, Jan 12, 2006
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. frekster
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    959
    frekster
    Sep 14, 2005
  2. Sasquatch
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    494
    Sasquatch
    Oct 4, 2006
  3. Peter Vogel
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    157
    Peter Vogel
    Oct 24, 2005
  4. Jack
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    751
  5. hisan
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,364
    Dan Stromberg
    Jun 25, 2012
Loading...

Share This Page