ASP.Net - Newbie Needs Some Help

Discussion in 'ASP .Net Web Controls' started by Paul Smith, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. Paul Smith

    Paul Smith Guest

    I am a newbie to ASP and I am trying to create a small on line
    helpdesk reporting tool. I have a table with about 7 fields in a
    database on an Sql server. I have created an ASP page with has Web
    Form Text boxes etc on it.

    I have connected the database to the form and got the sqlconnection
    and have created a dataset.

    But I am now stuck on how to update the database when ever one of my
    users clicks onto the submit button. I have found various help
    sheets, been on the ASP tutorials, but I am still not getting
    anywhere.

    Any help/advice/links greatly received.
     
    Paul Smith, Feb 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. Paul Smith

    DotNetJerome Guest

    Hi,

    The following link is having lot of sample apps... hope one of them must
    help you.

    http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/data/downloads/samples/default.aspx

    Cheers,

    Jerome. M

    "Paul Smith" wrote:

    > I am a newbie to ASP and I am trying to create a small on line
    > helpdesk reporting tool. I have a table with about 7 fields in a
    > database on an Sql server. I have created an ASP page with has Web
    > Form Text boxes etc on it.
    >
    > I have connected the database to the form and got the sqlconnection
    > and have created a dataset.
    >
    > But I am now stuck on how to update the database when ever one of my
    > users clicks onto the submit button. I have found various help
    > sheets, been on the ASP tutorials, but I am still not getting
    > anywhere.
    >
    > Any help/advice/links greatly received.
    >
     
    DotNetJerome, Feb 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. Hello
    there are many ways to update you data in the tables
    e.g

    Dim SQLCon As New SqlConnection

    Dim SQLComm As New SqlCommand

    Dim SQLDa As New SqlDataAdapter

    Dim DS As New DataSet

    Dim _CommandText As String

    Dim objDR As SqlDataReader





    SQLCon.ConnectionString = "User ID=sa;pwd=helo;Initial Catalog=123;Data
    Source=localhost"

    SQLComm.Connection = SQLCon

    SQLComm.CommandText = "UPDATE tbl_Users SET UserFName='" + UserFName.Text +
    "', UserLName='" + UserLName.Text + "', UserAddress='" + UserAddress.Text +
    "', UserPhone='" + UserPhone.Text + "' WHERE USERID=" + UserID.Text

    SQLCon.Open()

    SQLComm.ExecuteNonQuery()

    Kind Regards
    Malik Asif


    "Paul Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am a newbie to ASP and I am trying to create a small on line
    > helpdesk reporting tool. I have a table with about 7 fields in a
    > database on an Sql server. I have created an ASP page with has Web
    > Form Text boxes etc on it.
    >
    > I have connected the database to the form and got the sqlconnection
    > and have created a dataset.
    >
    > But I am now stuck on how to update the database when ever one of my
    > users clicks onto the submit button. I have found various help
    > sheets, been on the ASP tutorials, but I am still not getting
    > anywhere.
    >
    > Any help/advice/links greatly received.
     
    Malik Asif Joyia, Feb 24, 2005
    #3
  4. The .Net SDK is free, and an incredible resource. It has tutorials,
    articles, sample code, and a complete reference to the Common Language
    Runtime Library classes:

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...A6-3647-4070-9F41-A333C6B9181D&displaylang=en

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.

    "Paul Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am a newbie to ASP and I am trying to create a small on line
    > helpdesk reporting tool. I have a table with about 7 fields in a
    > database on an Sql server. I have created an ASP page with has Web
    > Form Text boxes etc on it.
    >
    > I have connected the database to the form and got the sqlconnection
    > and have created a dataset.
    >
    > But I am now stuck on how to update the database when ever one of my
    > users clicks onto the submit button. I have found various help
    > sheets, been on the ASP tutorials, but I am still not getting
    > anywhere.
    >
    > Any help/advice/links greatly received.
     
    Kevin Spencer, Feb 24, 2005
    #4
  5. Paul Smith

    Alan Silver Guest

    >The .Net SDK is free, and an incredible resource. It has tutorials,
    >articles, sample code, and a complete reference to the Common Language
    >Runtime Library classes:
    >
    >http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=9B3A2CA6-3647-4
    >070-9F41-A333C6B9181D&displaylang=en


    No offence, but it's also highly confusing and very daunting for a
    beginner.

    I would recommend a good book. I just finished reading ASP.NET Unleashed
    by Steven Walther and can highly recommend it. It was very clear (if
    rather long) and gave me a very good basis. I have learnt a lot in a
    short time thanks to that book and a lot of help from the good folk
    here.

    --
    Alan Silver
    (anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
     
    Alan Silver, Mar 3, 2005
    #5
  6. > No offence, but it's also highly confusing and very daunting for a
    > beginner.


    Pointers were daunting to me when I first started studying them. After
    studying for a sufficient length of time, I was no longer a beginner.

    No offense, but puting weights on your legs when running makes them
    stronger. Running slower does not.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.

    "Alan Silver" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >The .Net SDK is free, and an incredible resource. It has tutorials,
    >>articles, sample code, and a complete reference to the Common Language
    >>Runtime Library classes:
    >>
    >>http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=9B3A2CA6-3647-4
    >>070-9F41-A333C6B9181D&displaylang=en

    >
    > No offence, but it's also highly confusing and very daunting for a
    > beginner.
    >
    > I would recommend a good book. I just finished reading ASP.NET Unleashed
    > by Steven Walther and can highly recommend it. It was very clear (if
    > rather long) and gave me a very good basis. I have learnt a lot in a short
    > time thanks to that book and a lot of help from the good folk here.
    >
    > --
    > Alan Silver
    > (anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
     
    Kevin Spencer, Mar 3, 2005
    #6
  7. I should clarify that I'm not taking exception to the recommendation of a
    book. A book is a good way to get your feet wet. However, the SDK is free,
    comprehensive, and authoritative, which is not the case of any book about
    ..Net. In other words, if the SDK is free, why not have it as a reference if
    nothing else?

    I should mention that when I first started working with ASP.Net I DID buy a
    book on it, which I went through fairly quickly, and ever since have relied
    on the SDK.

    Also, the only daunting aspect of the SDK is the language it uses, which is
    technical and precise. However, learning that language/syntax is invaluable
    to any developer.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.

    "Alan Silver" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >The .Net SDK is free, and an incredible resource. It has tutorials,
    >>articles, sample code, and a complete reference to the Common Language
    >>Runtime Library classes:
    >>
    >>http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=9B3A2CA6-3647-4
    >>070-9F41-A333C6B9181D&displaylang=en

    >
    > No offence, but it's also highly confusing and very daunting for a
    > beginner.
    >
    > I would recommend a good book. I just finished reading ASP.NET Unleashed
    > by Steven Walther and can highly recommend it. It was very clear (if
    > rather long) and gave me a very good basis. I have learnt a lot in a short
    > time thanks to that book and a lot of help from the good folk here.
    >
    > --
    > Alan Silver
    > (anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
     
    Kevin Spencer, Mar 3, 2005
    #7
  8. Paul Smith

    Alan Silver Guest

    >I should clarify that I'm not taking exception to the recommendation of a
    >book. A book is a good way to get your feet wet. However, the SDK is free,
    >comprehensive, and authoritative, which is not the case of any book about
    >.Net. In other words, if the SDK is free, why not have it as a reference if
    >nothing else?


    Agreed 100%, I was just pointing out that a beginner could easily get
    put off by the SDK. I know my first experience of it put me off
    completely. I dropped the idea of ASP.NET for some time before coming
    back to it. I tried the SDK again and found it just as off-putting. I
    then got the book mentioned and found it wonderful. *Now* I can look at
    the SDK and have half an idea what it means ;-)

    I also don't believe in putting weights on your feet, but equally I
    believe in starting with something you can handle.

    >I should mention that when I first started working with ASP.Net I DID buy a
    >book on it, which I went through fairly quickly, and ever since have relied
    >on the SDK.


    Which is sensible and reasonable advice.

    >Also, the only daunting aspect of the SDK is the language it uses, which is
    >technical and precise. However, learning that language/syntax is invaluable
    >to any developer.


    Agreed again.

    I don't think we are arguing here, I was just issuing a warning about
    expecting the SDK to be useful for a beginner, despite being free and
    comprehensive. As a second (and further) step, it can't be beaten.

    ta ra

    --
    Alan Silver
    (anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
     
    Alan Silver, Mar 3, 2005
    #8
  9. Okay, Alan, good enough. But tell me this: When you DID start using the .Net
    SDK, did you still have to learn how to use it? Did putting off learning how
    to use it make it any easier to learn? My point is, if you want to learn
    something, you're going to have to work. Reading a book, while getting your
    feet wet, is not going to prepare you to use the .Net SDK. Using the .Net
    SDK is the only way. So, why put it off, since it is THE authoritative
    reference?

    If you want to get a book, well and good. But you should get the .Net SDK.
    Not necessarly second, but ASAP. It is, after all, free. Eventually, it is
    almost all you will use or need.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.

    "Alan Silver" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >I should clarify that I'm not taking exception to the recommendation of a
    >>book. A book is a good way to get your feet wet. However, the SDK is free,
    >>comprehensive, and authoritative, which is not the case of any book about
    >>.Net. In other words, if the SDK is free, why not have it as a reference
    >>if
    >>nothing else?

    >
    > Agreed 100%, I was just pointing out that a beginner could easily get put
    > off by the SDK. I know my first experience of it put me off completely. I
    > dropped the idea of ASP.NET for some time before coming back to it. I
    > tried the SDK again and found it just as off-putting. I then got the book
    > mentioned and found it wonderful. *Now* I can look at the SDK and have
    > half an idea what it means ;-)
    >
    > I also don't believe in putting weights on your feet, but equally I
    > believe in starting with something you can handle.
    >
    >>I should mention that when I first started working with ASP.Net I DID buy
    >>a
    >>book on it, which I went through fairly quickly, and ever since have
    >>relied
    >>on the SDK.

    >
    > Which is sensible and reasonable advice.
    >
    >>Also, the only daunting aspect of the SDK is the language it uses, which
    >>is
    >>technical and precise. However, learning that language/syntax is
    >>invaluable
    >>to any developer.

    >
    > Agreed again.
    >
    > I don't think we are arguing here, I was just issuing a warning about
    > expecting the SDK to be useful for a beginner, despite being free and
    > comprehensive. As a second (and further) step, it can't be beaten.
    >
    > ta ra
    >
    > --
    > Alan Silver
    > (anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
     
    Kevin Spencer, Mar 3, 2005
    #9
  10. Paul Smith

    Alan Silver Guest

    >Okay, Alan, good enough. But tell me this: When you DID start using the .Net
    >SDK,


    Only after I had read the book, or at least most of it, and had a good
    enough grasp on ASP.NET to be able to work out what the SDK was on
    about. Before that, I found it confusing.

    > did you still have to learn how to use it?


    The SDK? Sure, but I was talking about learning ASP.NET, not the SDK.

    > Did putting off learning how
    >to use it make it any easier to learn?


    I think we may be at cross purposes. My comments about not using the SDK
    straight away were because it put me off learning ASP.NET, not because
    it put me off the SDK. Once I had seen enough ASP.NET to understand what
    was going on, I could then make more sense of the SDK. Trying to use the
    SDK to learn ASP.NET was what I found confusing.

    > My point is, if you want to learn
    >something, you're going to have to work.


    Of course, but initially you might as well work on something that is
    going to benefit you, rather than something that is going to confuse
    you. You just need to know what order to tackle things. Once you have
    the basics (which I couldn't get from the SDK), then you can dive into
    the more complex stuff and really get going.

    >Reading a book, while getting your
    >feet wet, is not going to prepare you to use the .Net SDK. Using the .Net
    >SDK is the only way. So, why put it off, since it is THE authoritative
    >reference?


    Again, I think we are getting mixed up here. I wasn't talking about
    learning to use the SDK, obviously you need to do that at some point, I
    was talking about learning to use ASP.NET, which I assumed was the
    thrust of the OP's question. Reading a book was, for me, the most
    productive thing I did for learning ASP.NET.

    >If you want to get a book, well and good. But you should get the .Net SDK.
    >Not necessarly second, but ASAP. It is, after all, free. Eventually, it is
    >almost all you will use or need.


    Agreed 100%, well 99% actually, I wouldn't say you need it asap, I would
    say you need it once you have a basic grip of what ASP.NET is about.
    Whether that is asap or not depends on how fast you pick up ASP.NET!!
    For me, it was a few weeks with a good book.

    Ta ra

    --
    Alan Silver
    (anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
     
    Alan Silver, Mar 3, 2005
    #10
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