ASP.NET or Cold Fusion

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by tomlebold@msn.com, Apr 5, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I'm a Microsoft Access and ASP.NET developer.
    Currently I'm working at a company that uses Cold Fusion and we can't
    find any
    developers. I suggested that we use ASP.NET and Visual Studios.
    The Cold Fusion developers tell me that it takes longer to develope
    applications using ASP.NET. We are losing money because we can't get
    the applications created in Cold Fusion.
     
    , Apr 5, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. I would ask them for proof that Cold Fusion takes less time than ASP.NET.
    It might be true for some kinds of applications, but is it true for the apps
    you are building?
    I have nothing against Cold Fusion. I've used it before although that was a
    couple versions ago. At the time it seemed very comparable to ASP as far as
    development style and time to develop. Now that ASP.NET has the power of
    the .NET Framework behind it, that makes it more powerful and flexible than
    most alternatives.
    You might also consider performance metrics. I'm not sure how the current
    versions of ASP.NET and cold fusion compare to each other for performance
    these days, but I'd bet on ASP.NET when it comes to complex applications.

    --
    I hope this helps,
    Steve C. Orr, MCSD, MVP
    http://SteveOrr.net


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm a Microsoft Access and ASP.NET developer.
    > Currently I'm working at a company that uses Cold Fusion and we can't
    > find any
    > developers. I suggested that we use ASP.NET and Visual Studios.
    > The Cold Fusion developers tell me that it takes longer to develope
    > applications using ASP.NET. We are losing money because we can't get
    > the applications created in Cold Fusion.
    >
     
    Steve C. Orr [MVP, MCSD], Apr 5, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guest

    I do not know where you are located, but my company has a number of
    Cold Fusion developers that may be of service to you. Some are
    domestic and some are overseas. Send me an email or call me at
    201-679-0953.

    Thanks,

    Andy Blum
    CEO
    www.wildthoughttech.com
     
    , Apr 5, 2006
    #3
  4. Spam Catcher Guest

    wrote in news:1144270253.222115.152950
    @j33g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    > I suggested that we use ASP.NET and Visual Studios.
    > The Cold Fusion developers tell me that it takes longer to develope
    > applications using ASP.NET. We are losing money because we can't get
    > the applications created in Cold Fusion.


    I've developed in ASP, PHP, CFML, and ASP.NET.

    In terms of development time, here is what I found:

    ASP / CFML (fastest)
    PHP
    ASP.NET (slowest)

    HOWEVER, the time difference is minimal once you learn the .NET framework.
    Most of the development overhead comes from OO programming methodologies
    rather than .NET itself.

    BUT when it comes to maintainability ASP.NET is above and shoulders the
    competition.

    So although simple applications take longer in .NET, maintainability alone
    is worth the extra development time.

    I highly recommend your CFML developers to switch to ASP.NET. Most won't
    regret it. Yes, it's painful to learn a whole new development framework -
    but it's WELL worth the effort.
     
    Spam Catcher, Apr 5, 2006
    #4
  5. Jon Paal Guest

    ColdFusion is much easier to develop with because it does not require the complexity of the framework.

    ColdFusion can also use ASP.net...


    <> wrote in message news:...
    > I'm a Microsoft Access and ASP.NET developer.
    > Currently I'm working at a company that uses Cold Fusion and we can't
    > find any
    > developers. I suggested that we use ASP.NET and Visual Studios.
    > The Cold Fusion developers tell me that it takes longer to develope
    > applications using ASP.NET. We are losing money because we can't get
    > the applications created in Cold Fusion.
    >
     
    Jon Paal, Apr 6, 2006
    #5
  6. Brian F Guest

    Seconded. Go ColdFusion if you have any doubts.

    The biggest drawback to ColdFusion is the typelessness and lack of
    modularity. The community came up with a programming standard called
    FuseBox to help manage it. It works reliably for a small website with
    a specific purpose - no more than three developers or so. I think you'd
    see maintenance/scalability issues after that.

    The advantages to ColdFusion are small learning curve, very rapid
    development, fine control, and simplicity. Database connectivity is
    very simplified. Shooting yourself in the foot is much more difficult.
    CF integrates with COM, Java, MS dlls, and I'd imagine most web
    services by now (haven't checked in a while).

    I moved from ColdFusion 6.0 to ASPX 2.0. I'm an experienced programmer
    with a ton of C++ and Java. So protocols, oop, etc are all well
    understood. But Microsoft goes nuts over pragmas, directives, wizards,
    and drag-and-drop which is so much Club Microsoft stuff. There is a
    big learning curve to learn this BS. And it worsens the more you think
    "I want to do this" versus "How does Microsoft want me to do this?"
    The first three months I used ASP.NET I wrestled against it.

    One more parting shot, VS 2005 is crap. Intellisense isn't real-time.
    It lags behind reality by about 2-5 minutes or until the next build.
    Nested master pages won't render graphically. Microsoft messes with
    the root directory on the internal web server. ASP tags aren't
    recognized in a content page when editting unless /the master page is
    open/ in the editor. Who knows why. Refactoring is a joke. It takes
    me at least five minutes to rename a variable. Most of the time it
    breaks.

    Side note: Eclipse is the IDE of choice. Brilliant. I haven't tried
    it with .NET yet. But I've heard people have had success with it
    outside of Java.
     
    Brian F, Apr 20, 2006
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. CSDunn

    ASP.NET vs Cold Fusion

    CSDunn, Jul 28, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,211
    Bob Lehmann
    Jul 28, 2003
  2. Ralph
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    593
  3. =?Utf-8?B?UHJpeWE=?=

    ASP.NET communication with cold fusion

    =?Utf-8?B?UHJpeWE=?=, Mar 4, 2005, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    871
    Karl Seguin
    Mar 4, 2005
  4. Frank Bishop

    Passing Cold Fusion Variables to ASP.Net

    Frank Bishop, Aug 20, 2005, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    400
    jasonkester
    Aug 20, 2005
  5. BH337

    ASP.NET vs. Cold Fusion for developement

    BH337, Sep 17, 2007, in forum: ASP .Net Web Services
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    124
    BH337
    Sep 17, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page