asp question about post vars

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by glenn, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. glenn

    glenn Guest

    I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are past
    from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I can
    get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process on
    to the next page.

    I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to try to
    figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.

    I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and pass
    all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a better
    solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a lastname
    and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and then
    access those fields values on the result page?

    Thanks,

    glenn
     
    glenn, Feb 22, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and pass
    > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a better
    > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a lastname
    > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and then
    > access those fields values on the result page?


    This is kind of like that old joke: How do I get to Broadway? (Answer:
    practice). Although the punch line is a joke, the question is similar. There
    are many ways to "get to Broadway." Taking a cab might not be the best way
    if you're riding in a bus. Taking the subway is fast, as long as you're near
    a subway station.

    So, the first issue you will want to know is, what are the various ways that
    data can be passed from one page in an ASP.Net app to another?

    1. QueryString. This is useful when you're hyperlinking from one page to the
    other, and no security requirement dictates that the data should not appear
    to the user.
    2. "Traditional" form post. Yes, with ASP.Net you can still post a form to
    another page, but not a WebForm. This is an unusual case, so I won't bother
    with it.
    3. PostBack and Server.Transfer. Post the form back to itself. On the
    server-side, do a Server.Tranfer to transfer the context to a new page. This
    is useful when you don't want the user to know what data you're passing.
    4. PostBack and Response.Redirect. Post the form back to itself. On the
    server side, do a Response.Redirect. This sends a header to the browser
    telling it to request the second URL. This method has the same drawbacks as
    number 1.
    5. PostBack, store data in Session (or Application, depending upon the scope
    you want), and Redirect or Transfer. This is like numbers 3 and 4, but it
    uses Session space on the server to store the data. This way, no QueryString
    is needed, but you have to be careful about Session Timeouts.

    That's about all I can think of at the moment. Choose the method that works
    best in a given situation.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.


    "glenn" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    >I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are past
    > from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I can
    > get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process
    > on
    > to the next page.
    >
    > I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    > applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    > after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to try
    > to
    > figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    >
    > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and pass
    > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a better
    > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a lastname
    > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and then
    > access those fields values on the result page?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > glenn
    >
    >
     
    Kevin Spencer, Feb 22, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Because of the postback architecture that was implemented with ASP.NET, this
    task is not as easy as it once was. If you need to pass data between pages
    there are several options:

    1. Use querystring variables
    2. Use session variables
    3. Use application variables (careful, these are global)
    4. Use Server.Transfer (this is may be what you are looking for, see below)

    Page 1
    public class Page1 : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
    private void submitBtn_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {
    //these can be public fields or public properties
    //Creating public properties that get private fields
    //is a better practice
    lastName = "name1";
    firstName = "name2";

    Server.Transfer("page2.aspx");
    }
    }

    Page 2
    public class Page2 : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
    private void Page_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {
    Page1 myPage1 = (Page1)Context.Handler;
    string lastName = myPage1.lastName;
    string firstName = myPage2.firstName;
    }
    }




    "glenn" wrote:

    > I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are past
    > from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I can
    > get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process on
    > to the next page.
    >
    > I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    > applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    > after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to try to
    > figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    >
    > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and pass
    > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a better
    > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a lastname
    > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and then
    > access those fields values on the result page?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > glenn
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?c3N0ZXZlbnM=?=, Feb 22, 2005
    #3
  4. glenn

    glenn Guest

    I appreciate the response however, you are somewhat like a joke yourself. I
    asked a question. A simple question as none of the books I have answer it.
    You reply that I'm asking a stupid question and give me 5 ways to do it with
    not a single example or reference, so all you've done is tell me what I
    already thought I knew. I know what a post var is, and you list it as an
    answer but don't provide a way to do it. I am glad you answered the
    question, however, instead of stating the obvious next time, why don't you
    just stay quiet and let someone with an answer respond.

    I don't mean to be rude, but I have to say that the Microsoft community is
    the most hostile group of people I've ever dealt with. I can see why people
    want Linux and Borland to do so well. I have been in Borland Delphi for 10
    years now and have to say that the people over there are much nicer and much
    more helpful to people trying to learn a new product. Microsoft developers
    act like you work with God himself and don't need new users and are
    therefore rude when they ask what you believe to be stupid questions.

    Thanks for nothing,

    glenn


    "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:O$...
    > > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and

    pass
    > > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a

    better
    > > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a

    lastname
    > > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    then
    > > access those fields values on the result page?

    >
    > This is kind of like that old joke: How do I get to Broadway? (Answer:
    > practice). Although the punch line is a joke, the question is similar.

    There
    > are many ways to "get to Broadway." Taking a cab might not be the best way
    > if you're riding in a bus. Taking the subway is fast, as long as you're

    near
    > a subway station.
    >
    > So, the first issue you will want to know is, what are the various ways

    that
    > data can be passed from one page in an ASP.Net app to another?
    >
    > 1. QueryString. This is useful when you're hyperlinking from one page to

    the
    > other, and no security requirement dictates that the data should not

    appear
    > to the user.
    > 2. "Traditional" form post. Yes, with ASP.Net you can still post a form to
    > another page, but not a WebForm. This is an unusual case, so I won't

    bother
    > with it.
    > 3. PostBack and Server.Transfer. Post the form back to itself. On the
    > server-side, do a Server.Tranfer to transfer the context to a new page.

    This
    > is useful when you don't want the user to know what data you're passing.
    > 4. PostBack and Response.Redirect. Post the form back to itself. On the
    > server side, do a Response.Redirect. This sends a header to the browser
    > telling it to request the second URL. This method has the same drawbacks

    as
    > number 1.
    > 5. PostBack, store data in Session (or Application, depending upon the

    scope
    > you want), and Redirect or Transfer. This is like numbers 3 and 4, but it
    > uses Session space on the server to store the data. This way, no

    QueryString
    > is needed, but you have to be careful about Session Timeouts.
    >
    > That's about all I can think of at the moment. Choose the method that

    works
    > best in a given situation.
    >
    > --
    > HTH,
    >
    > Kevin Spencer
    > Microsoft MVP
    > .Net Developer
    > Neither a follower nor a lender be.
    >
    >
    > "glenn" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > >I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are past
    > > from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I

    can
    > > get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process
    > > on
    > > to the next page.
    > >
    > > I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    > > applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    > > after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to

    try
    > > to
    > > figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    > >
    > > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and

    pass
    > > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a

    better
    > > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a

    lastname
    > > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    then
    > > access those fields values on the result page?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > glenn
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    glenn, Feb 22, 2005
    #4
  5. glenn

    glenn Guest

    Thank you very much. That does answer my question and I think its what we
    were looking for.

    glenn


    "sstevens" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Because of the postback architecture that was implemented with ASP.NET,

    this
    > task is not as easy as it once was. If you need to pass data between

    pages
    > there are several options:
    >
    > 1. Use querystring variables
    > 2. Use session variables
    > 3. Use application variables (careful, these are global)
    > 4. Use Server.Transfer (this is may be what you are looking for, see

    below)
    >
    > Page 1
    > public class Page1 : System.Web.UI.Page
    > {
    > private void submitBtn_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    > {
    > //these can be public fields or public properties
    > //Creating public properties that get private fields
    > //is a better practice
    > lastName = "name1";
    > firstName = "name2";
    >
    > Server.Transfer("page2.aspx");
    > }
    > }
    >
    > Page 2
    > public class Page2 : System.Web.UI.Page
    > {
    > private void Page_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    > {
    > Page1 myPage1 = (Page1)Context.Handler;
    > string lastName = myPage1.lastName;
    > string firstName = myPage2.firstName;
    > }
    > }
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "glenn" wrote:
    >
    > > I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are

    past
    > > from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I

    can
    > > get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process

    on
    > > to the next page.
    > >
    > > I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    > > applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    > > after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to

    try to
    > > figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    > >
    > > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and

    pass
    > > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a

    better
    > > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a

    lastname
    > > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    then
    > > access those fields values on the result page?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > glenn
    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    glenn, Feb 22, 2005
    #5
  6. Hi glenn,

    > You reply that I'm asking a stupid question


    Would you please point out the word "stupid" or any other words in my
    message that were insulting to you? In fact, I did NOT think your question
    was stupid, or I wouldn't have spent all that time enumerating the various
    ways of passing data from one page to another.

    > not a single example or reference, so all you've done is tell me what I
    > already thought I knew. I know what a post var is, and you list it as an
    > answer but don't provide a way to do it.


    Here was your question:

    >> Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a
    >> lastname
    >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    >> then
    >> > access those fields values on the result page?


    I answered it. In detail. No, I didn't post any examples. Why should I? Did
    you ask for any? When one is talking in general terms, is it wise to provide
    specific examples? Should I assume that you need them? Why?

    > I don't mean to be rude, but I have to say that the Microsoft community
    > is
    > the most hostile group of people I've ever dealt with.


    Interesting. I made a joke to lighten things up. The joke (a VERY old joke)
    was in no way insulting, but that's how you took it. I would have to guess
    that YOU are the hostile one. And that you lack any sense of humor.

    > Microsoft developers
    > act like you work with God himself and don't need new users and are
    > therefore rude when they ask what you believe to be stupid questions.


    A lot of assumptions on your part, and mean-spirited ones at that. Listen,
    bub. I donate my time to help people like you, and spend a good bit of it
    making sure I'm giving you the right stuff. I do it out of the goodness of
    my heart. Your attitude sucks. Good luck. You'll need it.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.

    "glenn" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I appreciate the response however, you are somewhat like a joke yourself.
    >I
    > asked a question. A simple question as none of the books I have answer
    > it.
    > You reply that I'm asking a stupid question and give me 5 ways to do it
    > with
    > not a single example or reference, so all you've done is tell me what I
    > already thought I knew. I know what a post var is, and you list it as an
    > answer but don't provide a way to do it. I am glad you answered the
    > question, however, instead of stating the obvious next time, why don't you
    > just stay quiet and let someone with an answer respond.
    >
    > I don't mean to be rude, but I have to say that the Microsoft community
    > is
    > the most hostile group of people I've ever dealt with. I can see why
    > people
    > want Linux and Borland to do so well. I have been in Borland Delphi for
    > 10
    > years now and have to say that the people over there are much nicer and
    > much
    > more helpful to people trying to learn a new product. Microsoft
    > developers
    > act like you work with God himself and don't need new users and are
    > therefore rude when they ask what you believe to be stupid questions.
    >
    > Thanks for nothing,
    >
    > glenn
    >
    >
    > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > news:O$...
    >> > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and

    > pass
    >> > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a

    > better
    >> > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a

    > lastname
    >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    > then
    >> > access those fields values on the result page?

    >>
    >> This is kind of like that old joke: How do I get to Broadway? (Answer:
    >> practice). Although the punch line is a joke, the question is similar.

    > There
    >> are many ways to "get to Broadway." Taking a cab might not be the best
    >> way
    >> if you're riding in a bus. Taking the subway is fast, as long as you're

    > near
    >> a subway station.
    >>
    >> So, the first issue you will want to know is, what are the various ways

    > that
    >> data can be passed from one page in an ASP.Net app to another?
    >>
    >> 1. QueryString. This is useful when you're hyperlinking from one page to

    > the
    >> other, and no security requirement dictates that the data should not

    > appear
    >> to the user.
    >> 2. "Traditional" form post. Yes, with ASP.Net you can still post a form
    >> to
    >> another page, but not a WebForm. This is an unusual case, so I won't

    > bother
    >> with it.
    >> 3. PostBack and Server.Transfer. Post the form back to itself. On the
    >> server-side, do a Server.Tranfer to transfer the context to a new page.

    > This
    >> is useful when you don't want the user to know what data you're passing.
    >> 4. PostBack and Response.Redirect. Post the form back to itself. On the
    >> server side, do a Response.Redirect. This sends a header to the browser
    >> telling it to request the second URL. This method has the same drawbacks

    > as
    >> number 1.
    >> 5. PostBack, store data in Session (or Application, depending upon the

    > scope
    >> you want), and Redirect or Transfer. This is like numbers 3 and 4, but it
    >> uses Session space on the server to store the data. This way, no

    > QueryString
    >> is needed, but you have to be careful about Session Timeouts.
    >>
    >> That's about all I can think of at the moment. Choose the method that

    > works
    >> best in a given situation.
    >>
    >> --
    >> HTH,
    >>
    >> Kevin Spencer
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> .Net Developer
    >> Neither a follower nor a lender be.
    >>
    >>
    >> "glenn" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >> >I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are
    >> >past
    >> > from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I

    > can
    >> > get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to
    >> > process
    >> > on
    >> > to the next page.
    >> >
    >> > I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    >> > applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative.
    >> > However,
    >> > after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to

    > try
    >> > to
    >> > figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    >> >
    >> > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and

    > pass
    >> > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a

    > better
    >> > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a

    > lastname
    >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    > then
    >> > access those fields values on the result page?
    >> >
    >> > Thanks,
    >> >
    >> > glenn
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Kevin Spencer, Feb 22, 2005
    #6
  7. glenn

    glenn Guest

    Well, I'm sorry I asked such a confusing question. The second person that
    responded must have read something you did not as they were much much more
    polite and answered the question perfectly... Sorry for the
    misunderstanding. I'm so use to people making comments about how great
    things are but providing no details that I might have jumped you too
    quickly.

    I apologize...

    glenn


    "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi glenn,
    >
    > > You reply that I'm asking a stupid question

    >
    > Would you please point out the word "stupid" or any other words in my
    > message that were insulting to you? In fact, I did NOT think your question
    > was stupid, or I wouldn't have spent all that time enumerating the various
    > ways of passing data from one page to another.
    >
    > > not a single example or reference, so all you've done is tell me what I
    > > already thought I knew. I know what a post var is, and you list it as

    an
    > > answer but don't provide a way to do it.

    >
    > Here was your question:
    >
    > >> Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a
    > >> lastname
    > >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and
    > >> then
    > >> > access those fields values on the result page?

    >
    > I answered it. In detail. No, I didn't post any examples. Why should I?

    Did
    > you ask for any? When one is talking in general terms, is it wise to

    provide
    > specific examples? Should I assume that you need them? Why?
    >
    > > I don't mean to be rude, but I have to say that the Microsoft community
    > > is
    > > the most hostile group of people I've ever dealt with.

    >
    > Interesting. I made a joke to lighten things up. The joke (a VERY old

    joke)
    > was in no way insulting, but that's how you took it. I would have to guess
    > that YOU are the hostile one. And that you lack any sense of humor.
    >
    > > Microsoft developers
    > > act like you work with God himself and don't need new users and are
    > > therefore rude when they ask what you believe to be stupid questions.

    >
    > A lot of assumptions on your part, and mean-spirited ones at that. Listen,
    > bub. I donate my time to help people like you, and spend a good bit of it
    > making sure I'm giving you the right stuff. I do it out of the goodness of
    > my heart. Your attitude sucks. Good luck. You'll need it.
    >
    > --
    > HTH,
    >
    > Kevin Spencer
    > Microsoft MVP
    > .Net Developer
    > Neither a follower nor a lender be.
    >
    > "glenn" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I appreciate the response however, you are somewhat like a joke yourself.
    > >I
    > > asked a question. A simple question as none of the books I have answer
    > > it.
    > > You reply that I'm asking a stupid question and give me 5 ways to do it
    > > with
    > > not a single example or reference, so all you've done is tell me what I
    > > already thought I knew. I know what a post var is, and you list it as

    an
    > > answer but don't provide a way to do it. I am glad you answered the
    > > question, however, instead of stating the obvious next time, why don't

    you
    > > just stay quiet and let someone with an answer respond.
    > >
    > > I don't mean to be rude, but I have to say that the Microsoft community
    > > is
    > > the most hostile group of people I've ever dealt with. I can see why
    > > people
    > > want Linux and Borland to do so well. I have been in Borland Delphi for
    > > 10
    > > years now and have to say that the people over there are much nicer and
    > > much
    > > more helpful to people trying to learn a new product. Microsoft
    > > developers
    > > act like you work with God himself and don't need new users and are
    > > therefore rude when they ask what you believe to be stupid questions.
    > >
    > > Thanks for nothing,
    > >
    > > glenn
    > >
    > >
    > > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > > news:O$...
    > >> > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and

    > > pass
    > >> > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a

    > > better
    > >> > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a

    > > lastname
    > >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    > > then
    > >> > access those fields values on the result page?
    > >>
    > >> This is kind of like that old joke: How do I get to Broadway? (Answer:
    > >> practice). Although the punch line is a joke, the question is similar.

    > > There
    > >> are many ways to "get to Broadway." Taking a cab might not be the best
    > >> way
    > >> if you're riding in a bus. Taking the subway is fast, as long as you're

    > > near
    > >> a subway station.
    > >>
    > >> So, the first issue you will want to know is, what are the various ways

    > > that
    > >> data can be passed from one page in an ASP.Net app to another?
    > >>
    > >> 1. QueryString. This is useful when you're hyperlinking from one page

    to
    > > the
    > >> other, and no security requirement dictates that the data should not

    > > appear
    > >> to the user.
    > >> 2. "Traditional" form post. Yes, with ASP.Net you can still post a form
    > >> to
    > >> another page, but not a WebForm. This is an unusual case, so I won't

    > > bother
    > >> with it.
    > >> 3. PostBack and Server.Transfer. Post the form back to itself. On the
    > >> server-side, do a Server.Tranfer to transfer the context to a new page.

    > > This
    > >> is useful when you don't want the user to know what data you're

    passing.
    > >> 4. PostBack and Response.Redirect. Post the form back to itself. On the
    > >> server side, do a Response.Redirect. This sends a header to the browser
    > >> telling it to request the second URL. This method has the same

    drawbacks
    > > as
    > >> number 1.
    > >> 5. PostBack, store data in Session (or Application, depending upon the

    > > scope
    > >> you want), and Redirect or Transfer. This is like numbers 3 and 4, but

    it
    > >> uses Session space on the server to store the data. This way, no

    > > QueryString
    > >> is needed, but you have to be careful about Session Timeouts.
    > >>
    > >> That's about all I can think of at the moment. Choose the method that

    > > works
    > >> best in a given situation.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> HTH,
    > >>
    > >> Kevin Spencer
    > >> Microsoft MVP
    > >> .Net Developer
    > >> Neither a follower nor a lender be.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "glenn" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:%...
    > >> >I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are
    > >> >past
    > >> > from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where

    I
    > > can
    > >> > get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to
    > >> > process
    > >> > on
    > >> > to the next page.
    > >> >
    > >> > I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    > >> > applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative.
    > >> > However,
    > >> > after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to

    > > try
    > >> > to
    > >> > figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    > >> >
    > >> > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and

    > > pass
    > >> > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a

    > > better
    > >> > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a

    > > lastname
    > >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and

    > > then
    > >> > access those fields values on the result page?
    > >> >
    > >> > Thanks,
    > >> >
    > >> > glenn
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    glenn, Feb 22, 2005
    #7
  8. Thank you, glenn. Apoology accepted, and I'll be happy to help you in the
    future when I can.

    --

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.

    "glenn" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Well, I'm sorry I asked such a confusing question. The second person
    > that
    > responded must have read something you did not as they were much much more
    > polite and answered the question perfectly... Sorry for the
    > misunderstanding. I'm so use to people making comments about how great
    > things are but providing no details that I might have jumped you too
    > quickly.
    >
    > I apologize...
    >
    > glenn
    >
    >
    > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi glenn,
    >>
    >> > You reply that I'm asking a stupid question

    >>
    >> Would you please point out the word "stupid" or any other words in my
    >> message that were insulting to you? In fact, I did NOT think your
    >> question
    >> was stupid, or I wouldn't have spent all that time enumerating the
    >> various
    >> ways of passing data from one page to another.
    >>
    >> > not a single example or reference, so all you've done is tell me what I
    >> > already thought I knew. I know what a post var is, and you list it as

    > an
    >> > answer but don't provide a way to do it.

    >>
    >> Here was your question:
    >>
    >> >> Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a
    >> >> lastname
    >> >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page
    >> >> > and
    >> >> then
    >> >> > access those fields values on the result page?

    >>
    >> I answered it. In detail. No, I didn't post any examples. Why should I?

    > Did
    >> you ask for any? When one is talking in general terms, is it wise to

    > provide
    >> specific examples? Should I assume that you need them? Why?
    >>
    >> > I don't mean to be rude, but I have to say that the Microsoft
    >> > community
    >> > is
    >> > the most hostile group of people I've ever dealt with.

    >>
    >> Interesting. I made a joke to lighten things up. The joke (a VERY old

    > joke)
    >> was in no way insulting, but that's how you took it. I would have to
    >> guess
    >> that YOU are the hostile one. And that you lack any sense of humor.
    >>
    >> > Microsoft developers
    >> > act like you work with God himself and don't need new users and are
    >> > therefore rude when they ask what you believe to be stupid questions.

    >>
    >> A lot of assumptions on your part, and mean-spirited ones at that.
    >> Listen,
    >> bub. I donate my time to help people like you, and spend a good bit of it
    >> making sure I'm giving you the right stuff. I do it out of the goodness
    >> of
    >> my heart. Your attitude sucks. Good luck. You'll need it.
    >>
    >> --
    >> HTH,
    >>
    >> Kevin Spencer
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> .Net Developer
    >> Neither a follower nor a lender be.
    >>
    >> "glenn" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> >I appreciate the response however, you are somewhat like a joke
    >> >yourself.
    >> >I
    >> > asked a question. A simple question as none of the books I have answer
    >> > it.
    >> > You reply that I'm asking a stupid question and give me 5 ways to do it
    >> > with
    >> > not a single example or reference, so all you've done is tell me what I
    >> > already thought I knew. I know what a post var is, and you list it as

    > an
    >> > answer but don't provide a way to do it. I am glad you answered the
    >> > question, however, instead of stating the obvious next time, why don't

    > you
    >> > just stay quiet and let someone with an answer respond.
    >> >
    >> > I don't mean to be rude, but I have to say that the Microsoft
    >> > community
    >> > is
    >> > the most hostile group of people I've ever dealt with. I can see why
    >> > people
    >> > want Linux and Borland to do so well. I have been in Borland Delphi
    >> > for
    >> > 10
    >> > years now and have to say that the people over there are much nicer and
    >> > much
    >> > more helpful to people trying to learn a new product. Microsoft
    >> > developers
    >> > act like you work with God himself and don't need new users and are
    >> > therefore rude when they ask what you believe to be stupid questions.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks for nothing,
    >> >
    >> > glenn
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:O$...
    >> >> > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and
    >> > pass
    >> >> > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a
    >> > better
    >> >> > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a
    >> > lastname
    >> >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page
    >> >> > and
    >> > then
    >> >> > access those fields values on the result page?
    >> >>
    >> >> This is kind of like that old joke: How do I get to Broadway? (Answer:
    >> >> practice). Although the punch line is a joke, the question is similar.
    >> > There
    >> >> are many ways to "get to Broadway." Taking a cab might not be the best
    >> >> way
    >> >> if you're riding in a bus. Taking the subway is fast, as long as
    >> >> you're
    >> > near
    >> >> a subway station.
    >> >>
    >> >> So, the first issue you will want to know is, what are the various
    >> >> ways
    >> > that
    >> >> data can be passed from one page in an ASP.Net app to another?
    >> >>
    >> >> 1. QueryString. This is useful when you're hyperlinking from one page

    > to
    >> > the
    >> >> other, and no security requirement dictates that the data should not
    >> > appear
    >> >> to the user.
    >> >> 2. "Traditional" form post. Yes, with ASP.Net you can still post a
    >> >> form
    >> >> to
    >> >> another page, but not a WebForm. This is an unusual case, so I won't
    >> > bother
    >> >> with it.
    >> >> 3. PostBack and Server.Transfer. Post the form back to itself. On the
    >> >> server-side, do a Server.Tranfer to transfer the context to a new
    >> >> page.
    >> > This
    >> >> is useful when you don't want the user to know what data you're

    > passing.
    >> >> 4. PostBack and Response.Redirect. Post the form back to itself. On
    >> >> the
    >> >> server side, do a Response.Redirect. This sends a header to the
    >> >> browser
    >> >> telling it to request the second URL. This method has the same

    > drawbacks
    >> > as
    >> >> number 1.
    >> >> 5. PostBack, store data in Session (or Application, depending upon the
    >> > scope
    >> >> you want), and Redirect or Transfer. This is like numbers 3 and 4, but

    > it
    >> >> uses Session space on the server to store the data. This way, no
    >> > QueryString
    >> >> is needed, but you have to be careful about Session Timeouts.
    >> >>
    >> >> That's about all I can think of at the moment. Choose the method that
    >> > works
    >> >> best in a given situation.
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> HTH,
    >> >>
    >> >> Kevin Spencer
    >> >> Microsoft MVP
    >> >> .Net Developer
    >> >> Neither a follower nor a lender be.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> "glenn" <> wrote in message
    >> >> news:%...
    >> >> >I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are
    >> >> >past
    >> >> > from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where

    > I
    >> > can
    >> >> > get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to
    >> >> > process
    >> >> > on
    >> >> > to the next page.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    >> >> > applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative.
    >> >> > However,
    >> >> > after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books
    >> >> > to
    >> > try
    >> >> > to
    >> >> > figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and
    >> > pass
    >> >> > all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a
    >> > better
    >> >> > solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a
    >> > lastname
    >> >> > and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page
    >> >> > and
    >> > then
    >> >> > access those fields values on the result page?
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Thanks,
    >> >> >
    >> >> > glenn
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Kevin Spencer, Feb 22, 2005
    #8
  9. Having attempted to convert a GET to POST using about half the available
    xfer methods (and writing a whole lot of junk code in the process), here's
    my opinion on page-to-page in .Net:
    1. Don't use QueryString because a) all the variables are in the URL for the
    world to see, and b) you are limited by the URL length limitation (we have
    an app that hangs and eventually 404s(?) when using Response.Redirect with
    long querystrings)
    2. Don't use Context.Items. It seems to work, but because the item info
    isn't actually persisted to either the page source (viewstate or POSTed
    data) or the URL (QueryString), once the context is gone, the data is lost,
    so if you go from page 1 to page 2 to page 3, and then backtrack to page 1,
    the Context.Items for that page are lost forever. If it were persisted in
    one of those other 3 ways, it would not be
    3. Don't use Session. You'll run into some usenet posts where people
    suggest that, but a) that isn't what the session is for, and b) it scales
    horribly. Imagine the overhead on simply going from Page 1 to Page 2 via
    Session var passing. Not too bad, since it's just some serialization of a
    string, right? Change your state server to SQLServer and try now. Now put
    that state server on a different machine and try again. Now add 4 machines
    to your IIS cluster. Try now. Session usage should be minimized throughout
    your app, IMO, as you can't count on a full set of events (End goes away in
    a cluster), and performance is tremendously variable based on your
    particular server configuration, which itself is dynamic while your compiled
    code is relatively static.
    4. Don't use ViewState for transferring the information because there's too
    much work you have to do on your end to get it the data in and out of it
    (it's easier to reference the data than in #5), but it's not supposed to be
    used for that anyway.
    5. Use Server.Transfer, with the preserveForm parameter set to "true". WHat
    that last part does is tell the system to keep the various ASP.Net control
    fields in the POST header. So let's say Page 1 has "public TextBox
    UserName;", if you say from page1, "Server.Transfer("Page2", true)", from
    Page2, you have access to the value of UserName. The catch is that the
    Request.Param key name is TextBox's UniqueID, NOT ID, so if this control is
    within another control on your page,it will be
    Request["ParentControl:UserName"]. I get around this by, upon
    Page.PreRender, I call Page.RegisterHiddenInput("UserName",
    Request["ParentControl:UserName"]). This method seems to solve most of the
    issues, although figuring out a param name takes some computation + at least
    in my case, the naming issues presented by UniqueID mean we have to dump out
    an additional POST field, leading to twice the data getting passed.



    "sstevens" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Because of the postback architecture that was implemented with ASP.NET,
    > this
    > task is not as easy as it once was. If you need to pass data between
    > pages
    > there are several options:
    >
    > 1. Use querystring variables
    > 2. Use session variables
    > 3. Use application variables (careful, these are global)
    > 4. Use Server.Transfer (this is may be what you are looking for, see
    > below)
    >
    > Page 1
    > public class Page1 : System.Web.UI.Page
    > {
    > private void submitBtn_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    > {
    > //these can be public fields or public properties
    > //Creating public properties that get private fields
    > //is a better practice
    > lastName = "name1";
    > firstName = "name2";
    >
    > Server.Transfer("page2.aspx");
    > }
    > }
    >
    > Page 2
    > public class Page2 : System.Web.UI.Page
    > {
    > private void Page_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    > {
    > Page1 myPage1 = (Page1)Context.Handler;
    > string lastName = myPage1.lastName;
    > string firstName = myPage2.firstName;
    > }
    > }
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "glenn" wrote:
    >
    >> I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are past
    >> from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I
    >> can
    >> get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process
    >> on
    >> to the next page.
    >>
    >> I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    >> applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    >> after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to try
    >> to
    >> figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    >>
    >> I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and pass
    >> all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a better
    >> solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a lastname
    >> and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and
    >> then
    >> access those fields values on the result page?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> glenn
    >>
    >>
    >>
     
    Keith Patrick, Feb 22, 2005
    #9
  10. glenn

    Alvin Bruney Guest

    You can't say don't do this don't that, because you really don't know the
    context and business requirements for each application. Rather, you should
    use a recommendation. For instanace, in item 1, you list

    > 1. Don't use QueryString because a) all the variables are in the URL for
    > the world to see,

    Well that is certainly only true if you choose not to encrypt the
    querystring. Most applications that are enterprise grade do some form of
    encryption in this specific case. So you could rewrite the following as:

    Consider encrypting the querystring if application requirements force
    querystring usage.

    and so on and so forth...
    --
    Regards
    Alvin Bruney
    [Shameless Author Plug]
    The Microsoft Office Web Components Black Book with .NET
    available at www.lulu.com/owc
    --------------------------------------------------


    "Keith Patrick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Having attempted to convert a GET to POST using about half the available
    > xfer methods (and writing a whole lot of junk code in the process), here's
    > my opinion on page-to-page in .Net:
    > 1. Don't use QueryString because a) all the variables are in the URL for
    > the world to see, and b) you are limited by the URL length limitation (we
    > have an app that hangs and eventually 404s(?) when using Response.Redirect
    > with long querystrings)
    > 2. Don't use Context.Items. It seems to work, but because the item info
    > isn't actually persisted to either the page source (viewstate or POSTed
    > data) or the URL (QueryString), once the context is gone, the data is
    > lost, so if you go from page 1 to page 2 to page 3, and then backtrack to
    > page 1, the Context.Items for that page are lost forever. If it were
    > persisted in one of those other 3 ways, it would not be
    > 3. Don't use Session. You'll run into some usenet posts where people
    > suggest that, but a) that isn't what the session is for, and b) it scales
    > horribly. Imagine the overhead on simply going from Page 1 to Page 2 via
    > Session var passing. Not too bad, since it's just some serialization of a
    > string, right? Change your state server to SQLServer and try now. Now
    > put that state server on a different machine and try again. Now add 4
    > machines to your IIS cluster. Try now. Session usage should be minimized
    > throughout your app, IMO, as you can't count on a full set of events (End
    > goes away in a cluster), and performance is tremendously variable based on
    > your particular server configuration, which itself is dynamic while your
    > compiled code is relatively static.
    > 4. Don't use ViewState for transferring the information because there's
    > too much work you have to do on your end to get it the data in and out of
    > it (it's easier to reference the data than in #5), but it's not supposed
    > to be used for that anyway.
    > 5. Use Server.Transfer, with the preserveForm parameter set to "true".
    > WHat that last part does is tell the system to keep the various ASP.Net
    > control fields in the POST header. So let's say Page 1 has "public
    > TextBox UserName;", if you say from page1, "Server.Transfer("Page2",
    > true)", from Page2, you have access to the value of UserName. The catch
    > is that the Request.Param key name is TextBox's UniqueID, NOT ID, so if
    > this control is within another control on your page,it will be
    > Request["ParentControl:UserName"]. I get around this by, upon
    > Page.PreRender, I call Page.RegisterHiddenInput("UserName",
    > Request["ParentControl:UserName"]). This method seems to solve most of
    > the issues, although figuring out a param name takes some computation + at
    > least in my case, the naming issues presented by UniqueID mean we have to
    > dump out an additional POST field, leading to twice the data getting
    > passed.
    >
    >
    >
    > "sstevens" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Because of the postback architecture that was implemented with ASP.NET,
    >> this
    >> task is not as easy as it once was. If you need to pass data between
    >> pages
    >> there are several options:
    >>
    >> 1. Use querystring variables
    >> 2. Use session variables
    >> 3. Use application variables (careful, these are global)
    >> 4. Use Server.Transfer (this is may be what you are looking for, see
    >> below)
    >>
    >> Page 1
    >> public class Page1 : System.Web.UI.Page
    >> {
    >> private void submitBtn_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    >> {
    >> //these can be public fields or public properties
    >> //Creating public properties that get private fields
    >> //is a better practice
    >> lastName = "name1";
    >> firstName = "name2";
    >>
    >> Server.Transfer("page2.aspx");
    >> }
    >> }
    >>
    >> Page 2
    >> public class Page2 : System.Web.UI.Page
    >> {
    >> private void Page_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    >> {
    >> Page1 myPage1 = (Page1)Context.Handler;
    >> string lastName = myPage1.lastName;
    >> string firstName = myPage2.firstName;
    >> }
    >> }
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "glenn" wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are
    >>> past
    >>> from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I
    >>> can
    >>> get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process
    >>> on
    >>> to the next page.
    >>>
    >>> I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    >>> applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    >>> after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to
    >>> try to
    >>> figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    >>>
    >>> I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and
    >>> pass
    >>> all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a
    >>> better
    >>> solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a
    >>> lastname
    >>> and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and
    >>> then
    >>> access those fields values on the result page?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> glenn
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    >
     
    Alvin Bruney, Feb 23, 2005
    #10
  11. > 1. Don't use QueryString because a) all the variables are in the URL for
    > the world to see, and b) you are limited by the URL length limitation (we
    > have an app that hangs and eventually 404s(?) when using Response.Redirect
    > with long querystrings)


    Wrong. Use QueryString when appropriate. For example, Google uses
    QueryString for it's searches. Why? So you can bookmark the page!

    > 3. Don't use Session. You'll run into some usenet posts where people
    > suggest that, but a) that isn't what the session is for, and b) it scales
    > horribly.


    Wrong. Use Session when appropriate. Session has certain characteristics
    that make it particularly appropriate for certain situations. The idea that
    Session "scales horribly" is not true. Big things are made up of lots of
    little things. If you pile data into a user's Session, it certainly will
    scale horribly, because you are multiplying the data times the number of
    concurrent users. But if you use it wisely, it will come in quite handy with
    stuff that must be persisted on a per-user basis for the length of a user
    Session.

    Look, if programming were carpentry, and the platform was a box of tools,
    would you tell people not to use the phillips-head screwdriver or the vice
    grips? These are all tools, and each is designed for a specific purpose. As
    long as youy don't use the screw driver to hammer nails, and you don't use
    the vice grips to cut lumber, you're going to be fine.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    Neither a follower nor a lender be.

    "Keith Patrick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Having attempted to convert a GET to POST using about half the available
    > xfer methods (and writing a whole lot of junk code in the process), here's
    > my opinion on page-to-page in .Net:
    > 1. Don't use QueryString because a) all the variables are in the URL for
    > the world to see, and b) you are limited by the URL length limitation (we
    > have an app that hangs and eventually 404s(?) when using Response.Redirect
    > with long querystrings)
    > 2. Don't use Context.Items. It seems to work, but because the item info
    > isn't actually persisted to either the page source (viewstate or POSTed
    > data) or the URL (QueryString), once the context is gone, the data is
    > lost, so if you go from page 1 to page 2 to page 3, and then backtrack to
    > page 1, the Context.Items for that page are lost forever. If it were
    > persisted in one of those other 3 ways, it would not be
    > 3. Don't use Session. You'll run into some usenet posts where people
    > suggest that, but a) that isn't what the session is for, and b) it scales
    > horribly. Imagine the overhead on simply going from Page 1 to Page 2 via
    > Session var passing. Not too bad, since it's just some serialization of a
    > string, right? Change your state server to SQLServer and try now. Now
    > put that state server on a different machine and try again. Now add 4
    > machines to your IIS cluster. Try now. Session usage should be minimized
    > throughout your app, IMO, as you can't count on a full set of events (End
    > goes away in a cluster), and performance is tremendously variable based on
    > your particular server configuration, which itself is dynamic while your
    > compiled code is relatively static.
    > 4. Don't use ViewState for transferring the information because there's
    > too much work you have to do on your end to get it the data in and out of
    > it (it's easier to reference the data than in #5), but it's not supposed
    > to be used for that anyway.
    > 5. Use Server.Transfer, with the preserveForm parameter set to "true".
    > WHat that last part does is tell the system to keep the various ASP.Net
    > control fields in the POST header. So let's say Page 1 has "public
    > TextBox UserName;", if you say from page1, "Server.Transfer("Page2",
    > true)", from Page2, you have access to the value of UserName. The catch
    > is that the Request.Param key name is TextBox's UniqueID, NOT ID, so if
    > this control is within another control on your page,it will be
    > Request["ParentControl:UserName"]. I get around this by, upon
    > Page.PreRender, I call Page.RegisterHiddenInput("UserName",
    > Request["ParentControl:UserName"]). This method seems to solve most of
    > the issues, although figuring out a param name takes some computation + at
    > least in my case, the naming issues presented by UniqueID mean we have to
    > dump out an additional POST field, leading to twice the data getting
    > passed.
    >
    >
    >
    > "sstevens" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Because of the postback architecture that was implemented with ASP.NET,
    >> this
    >> task is not as easy as it once was. If you need to pass data between
    >> pages
    >> there are several options:
    >>
    >> 1. Use querystring variables
    >> 2. Use session variables
    >> 3. Use application variables (careful, these are global)
    >> 4. Use Server.Transfer (this is may be what you are looking for, see
    >> below)
    >>
    >> Page 1
    >> public class Page1 : System.Web.UI.Page
    >> {
    >> private void submitBtn_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    >> {
    >> //these can be public fields or public properties
    >> //Creating public properties that get private fields
    >> //is a better practice
    >> lastName = "name1";
    >> firstName = "name2";
    >>
    >> Server.Transfer("page2.aspx");
    >> }
    >> }
    >>
    >> Page 2
    >> public class Page2 : System.Web.UI.Page
    >> {
    >> private void Page_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    >> {
    >> Page1 myPage1 = (Page1)Context.Handler;
    >> string lastName = myPage1.lastName;
    >> string firstName = myPage2.firstName;
    >> }
    >> }
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "glenn" wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am use to programming in php and the way session and post vars are
    >>> past
    >>> from fields on one page through to the post page automatically where I
    >>> can
    >>> get to their values easily to write to a database or continue to process
    >>> on
    >>> to the next page.
    >>>
    >>> I am now trying to learn ASP to see if we can replace some of our
    >>> applications that were written in php with an ASP alternative. However,
    >>> after doing many searches on google and reading a couple ASP books to
    >>> try to
    >>> figure out this simple task I'm still without a solution.
    >>>
    >>> I've had a couple people tell me that I need to do query strings and
    >>> pass
    >>> all the values on the form over individually but surely there is a
    >>> better
    >>> solution. Can anyone tell me the best way to take a form with a
    >>> lastname
    >>> and firstname field and pass them through a post to a result page and
    >>> then
    >>> access those fields values on the result page?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> glenn
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    >
     
    Kevin Spencer, Feb 23, 2005
    #11
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