automated web testing advice

Discussion in 'Java' started by Marc E, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. Marc E

    Marc E Guest

    Greetings all.

    I'm seeking advice on a proper approach for automating web testing. My
    ambitions are modest: I want to be able to programmatically go into a site,
    click some links, submit some forms, and ensure nothing is broken.
    occassionally i'll want to investigate the contents of a form field, change
    form fields and submit and then investigate that fields were saved
    appropriately, etc.

    I'm doing this to test several web applications that are not written in
    java. I have a product, and there's a version of the product for a number of
    separate clients. Each of these versions then lives on a bunch of different
    servers (dev, test, QA, staging, Prod), and I want to use these tests for
    initial smoke testing of deployments.

    Now, I can currently do all of this with httpunit and it's pretty fun to
    write the tests. And since the functionality among the client apps is so
    similar, I can write a single group of core tests and just point the test to
    the different URLs...so I get high reuse.

    The downside here is that if I go this route, i know i'll be the one stuck
    building and maintaining all of the tests, and I'm not sure I want to take
    that on.

    I understand that there are "recorder" type tools for doing this sort of
    thing, and if they are high quality, then other people could use them. But I
    fear that with all the different apps and all the different environments,
    these things might not scale well since we'd be recording the same set of
    steps for each client app, etc. In addition, I understand that at least some
    of these tools (Mercury TestDirector, from what i hear) uses the coordinates
    for recording. So if a link moves, your test breaks. I do not know this for
    certain...this is from someone who investigated this product for our company
    several years ago and turned it down.

    So...given these things, which I imagine has to be a pretty common scenario,
    does anyone have any advice for proceeding? I don't mind writing and
    maintaining the tests, but I'd hate to put all that time into it and then
    hear "oh, dude, you could've just bought XYZ package and banged all that
    stuff out in a few days and then all your other people could also help with
    the test building"

    Thanks for all advice.

    Marc
     
    Marc E, Apr 4, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Marc E

    Guest

    On Apr 4, 5:47 pm, "Marc E" <> wrote:
    > Greetings all.
    >
    > I'm seeking advice on a proper approach for automatingweb testing. My
    > ambitions are modest: I want to be able to programmatically go into a site,
    > click some links, submit some forms, and ensure nothing is broken.
    > occassionally i'll want to investigate the contents of a form field, change
    > form fields and submit and then investigate that fields were saved
    > appropriately, etc.


    Since you do _not_ need to test Java, try the *free* iMacros for
    Firefox from http://www.iopus.com/imacros/firefox/

    It contains a STOPWATCH commands so you can even measure web page
    response times and log them into a file. The same company also offers
    some paid versions that can test Java and Flash applets, too. This is
    what we use in our company. But it seems for your tasks the free
    version is sufficient.

    Francis
     
    , Apr 5, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Marc E

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 4 Apr, 16:47, "Marc E" <> wrote:

    > I'm seeking advice on a proper approach for automating web testing. My
    > ambitions are modest: I want to be able to programmatically go into a site,
    > click some links, submit some forms, and ensure nothing is broken.


    Tsung / Erlang loook promising.

    Like most of these things, initial setup is a manual pain, then future
    regression is easy. Erlang's a language you can use to write your
    tests, Tsung is a proxy that catches manual input and makes Erlang
    scripts for you.
     
    Andy Dingley, Apr 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Marc E

    alex Guest

    On Apr 4, 11:47 am, "Marc E" <> wrote:
    > Greetings all.
    >
    > I'm seeking advice on a proper approach for automating web testing. My
    > ambitions are modest: I want to be able to programmatically go into a site,
    > click some links, submit some forms, and ensure nothing is broken.
    > occassionally i'll want to investigate the contents of a form field, change
    > form fields and submit and then investigate that fields were saved
    > appropriately, etc.
    >
    > I'm doing this to test several web applications that are not written in
    > java. I have a product, and there's a version of the product for a number of
    > separate clients. Each of these versions then lives on a bunch of different
    > servers (dev, test, QA, staging, Prod), and I want to use these tests for
    > initial smoke testing of deployments.
    >
    > Now, I can currently do all of this with httpunit and it's pretty fun to
    > write the tests. And since the functionality among the client apps is so
    > similar, I can write a single group of core tests and just point the test to
    > the different URLs...so I get high reuse.
    >
    > The downside here is that if I go this route, i know i'll be the one stuck
    > building and maintaining all of the tests, and I'm not sure I want to take
    > that on.
    >
    > I understand that there are "recorder" type tools for doing this sort of
    > thing, and if they are high quality, then other people could use them. But I
    > fear that with all the different apps and all the different environments,
    > these things might not scale well since we'd be recording the same set of
    > steps for each client app, etc. In addition, I understand that at least some
    > of these tools (Mercury TestDirector, from what i hear) uses the coordinates
    > for recording. So if a link moves, your test breaks. I do not know this for
    > certain...this is from someone who investigated this product for our company
    > several years ago and turned it down.
    >
    > So...given these things, which I imagine has to be a pretty common scenario,
    > does anyone have any advice for proceeding? I don't mind writing and
    > maintaining the tests, but I'd hate to put all that time into it and then
    > hear "oh, dude, you could've just bought XYZ package and banged all that
    > stuff out in a few days and then all your other people could also help with
    > the test building"
    >
    > Thanks for all advice.
    >
    > Marc


    You can also try SWExplorerAutomation (SWEA) from http://webiussoft.com.
    SWEA can records tests and generate C# (very close to Java) test
    script code.
     
    alex, Apr 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Marc E

    Marc E Guest

    Thanks for the responses everyone.

    i'm surprised that noone suggested looking at jameleon. looking at it, it
    seems cool...i'm just wondering if anyone actually uses the thing.

    i'll check out all your suggestions.


    "alex" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Apr 4, 11:47 am, "Marc E" <> wrote:
    >> Greetings all.
    >>
    >> I'm seeking advice on a proper approach for automating web testing. My
    >> ambitions are modest: I want to be able to programmatically go into a
    >> site,
    >> click some links, submit some forms, and ensure nothing is broken.
    >> occassionally i'll want to investigate the contents of a form field,
    >> change
    >> form fields and submit and then investigate that fields were saved
    >> appropriately, etc.
    >>
    >> I'm doing this to test several web applications that are not written in
    >> java. I have a product, and there's a version of the product for a number
    >> of
    >> separate clients. Each of these versions then lives on a bunch of
    >> different
    >> servers (dev, test, QA, staging, Prod), and I want to use these tests for
    >> initial smoke testing of deployments.
    >>
    >> Now, I can currently do all of this with httpunit and it's pretty fun to
    >> write the tests. And since the functionality among the client apps is so
    >> similar, I can write a single group of core tests and just point the test
    >> to
    >> the different URLs...so I get high reuse.
    >>
    >> The downside here is that if I go this route, i know i'll be the one
    >> stuck
    >> building and maintaining all of the tests, and I'm not sure I want to
    >> take
    >> that on.
    >>
    >> I understand that there are "recorder" type tools for doing this sort of
    >> thing, and if they are high quality, then other people could use them.
    >> But I
    >> fear that with all the different apps and all the different environments,
    >> these things might not scale well since we'd be recording the same set of
    >> steps for each client app, etc. In addition, I understand that at least
    >> some
    >> of these tools (Mercury TestDirector, from what i hear) uses the
    >> coordinates
    >> for recording. So if a link moves, your test breaks. I do not know this
    >> for
    >> certain...this is from someone who investigated this product for our
    >> company
    >> several years ago and turned it down.
    >>
    >> So...given these things, which I imagine has to be a pretty common
    >> scenario,
    >> does anyone have any advice for proceeding? I don't mind writing and
    >> maintaining the tests, but I'd hate to put all that time into it and then
    >> hear "oh, dude, you could've just bought XYZ package and banged all that
    >> stuff out in a few days and then all your other people could also help
    >> with
    >> the test building"
    >>
    >> Thanks for all advice.
    >>
    >> Marc

    >
    > You can also try SWExplorerAutomation (SWEA) from http://webiussoft.com.
    > SWEA can records tests and generate C# (very close to Java) test
    > script code.
    >
     
    Marc E, Apr 6, 2007
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Alvin Bruney

    Automated Testing software

    Alvin Bruney, Nov 20, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    387
    Kevin Spencer
    Nov 20, 2003
  2. Tim Smith
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    411
    Tim Smith
    Feb 20, 2004
  3. Rhino
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    458
    Rhino
    Mar 12, 2005
  4. Quixote
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    548
  5. reggie
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    270
    reggie
    Jun 22, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page