Automatically displaying a pdf file

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Todd Cary, Jan 15, 2004.

  1. Todd Cary

    Todd Cary Guest

    I want to have a pdf file automatically load into the users system and I
    cannot figure out how to do that. Could someone refer me to an example?

    Many thanks....

    Todd
    Todd Cary, Jan 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. Todd Cary

    Steve R. Guest

    Todd Cary wrote in message ...
    > I want to have a pdf file automatically load into the user's
    > system and I cannot figure out how to do that.


    What if they don't have a pdf reader ?

    D'oh :~(
    Steve R., Jan 15, 2004
    #2
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  3. Todd Cary

    Todd Cary Guest

    Steve -

    I have a link to download the PDF Reader....

    Todd

    Steve R. wrote:
    > Todd Cary wrote in message ...
    >
    >>I want to have a pdf file automatically load into the user's
    >>system and I cannot figure out how to do that.

    >
    >
    > What if they don't have a pdf reader ?
    >
    > D'oh :~(
    >
    >
    Todd Cary, Jan 15, 2004
    #3
  4. Todd Cary

    PeterMcC Guest

    Todd Cary <> wrote in
    <9cANb.8853$>

    > I want to have a pdf file automatically load into the users system
    > and I cannot figure out how to do that. Could someone refer me to an
    > example?


    <a href="name_of_file.pdf">View the pdf file</a>

    If the user hasn't got a pdf reader, or the one they have is not configured
    to automatically display the file, the file will download; otherwise it will
    display automatically. If someone has configured their pdf reader not to
    display files automatically, I guess they have their reasons.

    --
    PeterMcC
    If you feel that any of the above is incorrect,
    inappropriate or offensive in any way,
    please ignore it and accept my apologies.
    PeterMcC, Jan 15, 2004
    #4
  5. Todd Cary

    Steve R. Guest

    Todd Cary wrote in message ...
    > I have a link to download the PDF Reader....


    Why why should they, (even if they have 'Adobe' reader), be forced to do
    what *you* want when it would be better to do it in HTML. That way they can
    read your information on their browsers without downloading a pdf file :~)
    Steve R., Jan 15, 2004
    #5
  6. Todd Cary

    Todd Cary Guest

    Steve -

    My task is to present to lawyers, handling a large class action case,
    TIFF images of the claimant's application that have been converted to
    pdf's. The lawyer has selected the claim number from a database of
    800,000 the "scan" of the submitted claim. So the user has already
    decided to view the image. Now I need to present the image to the user
    (lawyer).

    Todd

    Steve R. wrote:

    > Todd Cary wrote in message ...
    >
    >>I have a link to download the PDF Reader....

    >
    >
    > Why why should they, (even if they have 'Adobe' reader), be forced to do
    > what *you* want when it would be better to do it in HTML. That way they can
    > read your information on their browsers without downloading a pdf file :~)
    >
    >
    Todd Cary, Jan 15, 2004
    #6
  7. Todd Cary

    Todd Cary Guest

    Many thanks.....exactly what I needed...

    Todd

    PeterMcC wrote:

    > Todd Cary <> wrote in
    > <9cANb.8853$>
    >
    >>I want to have a pdf file automatically load into the users system
    >>and I cannot figure out how to do that. Could someone refer me to an
    >>example?

    >
    >
    > <a href="name_of_file.pdf">View the pdf file</a>
    >
    > If the user hasn't got a pdf reader, or the one they have is not configured
    > to automatically display the file, the file will download; otherwise it will
    > display automatically. If someone has configured their pdf reader not to
    > display files automatically, I guess they have their reasons.
    >
    Todd Cary, Jan 15, 2004
    #7
  8. Todd Cary <> wrote:

    > My task is to present to lawyers, handling a large class action
    > case, TIFF images of the claimant's application that have been
    > converted to pdf's. The lawyer has selected the claim number from
    > a database of 800,000 the "scan" of the submitted claim. So the
    > user has already decided to view the image. Now I need to present
    > the image to the user (lawyer).


    So is this about images or about PDF?

    Anyway, if it's about a database query, then the server-side script
    that performs the query could pick up the right image, or the right PDF
    document, and send _it_ as the response. No reason to involve HTML.

    However, such systems are normally built so that the query response is
    an HTML document, containing texts (or, if you prefer, images, but you
    can't really use TIFF images as embedded into HTML) that are links to
    PDF documents.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
    Jukka K. Korpela, Jan 15, 2004
    #8
  9. Todd Cary

    Jim Royal Guest

    In article <gGANb.413$>, Steve R.
    <stevie_ritchie(NOSPAM)@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Why why should they, (even if they have 'Adobe' reader), be forced to do
    > what *you* want when it would be better to do it in HTML. That way they can
    > read your information on their browsers without downloading a pdf file :~)


    How do you know that the visitor doesn't want a PDF file?

    If I had a 40-page glossy annual report to post on a company's web
    site, would you created an HTML version of the whole dang thing when
    providing a PDF would be more covenient for the visitor?

    One shouldn't make assumptions about the needs of people asking
    questions. Often they already have a grasp on what they need to know.

    --
    Jim Royal
    "Understanding is a three-edged sword"
    http://JimRoyal.com
    Jim Royal, Jan 16, 2004
    #9
  10. Todd Cary

    mscir Guest

    Jim Royal wrote:
    > In article <gGANb.413$>, Steve R.
    > <stevie_ritchie(NOSPAM)@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Why why should they, (even if they have 'Adobe' reader), be forced to do
    >>what *you* want when it would be better to do it in HTML. That way they can
    >>read your information on their browsers without downloading a pdf file :~)

    >
    > How do you know that the visitor doesn't want a PDF file?
    >
    > If I had a 40-page glossy annual report to post on a company's web
    > site, would you created an HTML version of the whole dang thing when
    > providing a PDF would be more covenient for the visitor?
    >
    > One shouldn't make assumptions about the needs of people asking
    > questions. Often they already have a grasp on what they need to know.


    While it is not always practical, I would post anything but pdf whenever
    possible: html, word, plain text... to me anything is preferable to pdf,
    I avoid them whenever possible. I for one will be very happy when
    something better (better looking, smaller-faster engine) replaces them.
    mscir, Jan 16, 2004
    #10
  11. Todd Cary

    Jim Royal Guest

    In article <>, mscir
    <> wrote:

    > While it is not always practical, I would post anything but pdf whenever
    > possible: html, word, plain text... to me anything is preferable to pdf,
    > I avoid them whenever possible. I for one will be very happy when
    > something better (better looking, smaller-faster engine) replaces them.


    Likewise, HTML, Word, and plain text are not always practical. PDF is a
    marvelous format for delivering certain types of information... And is
    terrible for others.

    PDF is searchable, printable, portable. HTML is none of those things,
    unless you have server-side support, which is not always a given. If I
    had a 100 page manual to provide to a customer, HTML would be an
    intolerable cruelty.

    I pick the tool that suits the job.

    --
    Jim Royal
    "Understanding is a three-edged sword"
    http://JimRoyal.com
    Jim Royal, Jan 16, 2004
    #11
  12. Jim Royal wrote:

    > PDF is searchable, printable, portable. HTML is none of those things,
    > unless you have server-side support


    HTML is all of those things without server-side support.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
    Toby A Inkster, Jan 16, 2004
    #12
  13. Todd Cary

    Jim Royal Guest

    In article <>, Toby A
    Inkster <> wrote:

    > > PDF is searchable, printable, portable. HTML is none of those things,
    > > unless you have server-side support

    >
    > HTML is all of those things without server-side support.


    Uh, huh. Right.

    Print 50 web pages at once. Search 50 web pages at once. Email 50 web
    pages at once.

    HTML is a clumsy solution for some things, and PDF files are a perfect
    alternative.

    --
    Jim Royal
    "Understanding is a three-edged sword"
    http://JimRoyal.com
    Jim Royal, Jan 16, 2004
    #13
  14. Jim Royal wrote:
    > In article <>, Toby A
    > Inkster <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>PDF is searchable, printable, portable. HTML is none of those things,
    >>>unless you have server-side support

    >>
    >>HTML is all of those things without server-side support.

    >
    >
    > Uh, huh. Right.
    >
    > Print 50 web pages at once. Search 50 web pages at once. Email 50 web
    > pages at once.


    Hmm, hmm. It looks like you are comparing one 50-page PDF document to 50
    one-page HTML documents. Apples and oranges.


    Matthias
    Matthias Gutfeldt, Jan 16, 2004
    #14
  15. On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 16:26:33 +0100, Matthias Gutfeldt wrote:

    >> Print 50 web pages at once. Search 50 web pages at once. Email 50 web
    >> pages at once.

    >
    > Hmm, hmm. It looks like you are comparing one 50-page PDF document to 50
    > one-page HTML documents. Apples and oranges.


    But have you *tried* printing an HTML document lately, from a browser? It
    never prints as expected or desired. PDF (nearly) always prints exactly as
    expected.

    --
    Jeffrey D. Silverman | jeffrey AT jhu DOT edu
    Website | http://www.wse.jhu.edu/newtnotes/
    Jeffrey Silverman, Jan 16, 2004
    #15
  16. Jeffrey Silverman wrote:
    > On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 16:26:33 +0100, Matthias Gutfeldt wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Print 50 web pages at once. Search 50 web pages at once. Email 50 web
    >>>pages at once.

    >>
    >>Hmm, hmm. It looks like you are comparing one 50-page PDF document to 50
    >>one-page HTML documents. Apples and oranges.

    >
    >
    > But have you *tried* printing an HTML document lately, from a browser? It
    > never prints as expected or desired. PDF (nearly) always prints exactly as
    > expected.
    >


    HTML is surely not an ideal document publishing format.
    JustAnotherGuy, Jan 16, 2004
    #16
  17. Jeffrey Silverman wrote:

    > But have you *tried* printing an HTML document lately, from a browser? It
    > never prints as expected or desired. PDF (nearly) always prints exactly as
    > expected.


    Opera has great support for the CSS printing stuff.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
    Toby A Inkster, Jan 16, 2004
    #17
  18. In article <Xns9471D6A2D65DFjkorpelacstutfi@193.229.0.31>,
    "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote:

    > Todd Cary <> wrote:
    >
    > > My task is to present to lawyers, handling a large class action
    > > case, TIFF images of the claimant's application that have been
    > > converted to pdf's. The lawyer has selected the claim number from
    > > a database of 800,000 the "scan" of the submitted claim. So the
    > > user has already decided to view the image. Now I need to present
    > > the image to the user (lawyer).

    >
    > So is this about images or about PDF?
    >
    > Anyway, if it's about a database query, then the server-side script
    > that performs the query could pick up the right image, or the right PDF
    > document, and send _it_ as the response. No reason to involve HTML.
    >
    > However, such systems are normally built so that the query response is
    > an HTML document, containing texts (or, if you prefer, images, but you
    > can't really use TIFF images as embedded into HTML) that are links to
    > PDF documents.


    Most browsers will display a TIFF inline if you embed it, I believe. At
    least on my computer.

    --
    | Andrew Glasgow <amg39(at)cornell.edu> |
    | "SCSI is *NOT* magic. There are *fundamental technical reasons* why it |
    | is necessary to sacrifice a young goat to your SCSI chain now and then." |
    | -- John Woods |
    Andrew Glasgow, Jan 16, 2004
    #18
  19. Todd Cary

    Paul Furman Guest

    Andrew Glasgow wrote:
    >
    > Most browsers will display a TIFF inline if you embed it, I believe. At
    > least on my computer.


    They come up in quicktime on my win2k machine.
    Paul Furman, Jan 16, 2004
    #19
  20. Todd Cary

    Jim Royal Guest

    In article <bu8vrf$eaqjq$-berlin.de>, Matthias
    Gutfeldt <> wrote:

    > Hmm, hmm. It looks like you are comparing one 50-page PDF document to 50
    > one-page HTML documents. Apples and oranges.


    This is my point. You cannot have a 50-page HTML document.

    I object to the blanket statement that PDF files should be avoided at
    all costs, as an earlier poster suggested. This is unrealistic, and can
    actually hurt a site's usability.

    --
    Jim Royal
    "Understanding is a three-edged sword"
    http://JimRoyal.com
    Jim Royal, Jan 16, 2004
    #20
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