backward compatibility?

Discussion in 'Python' started by Peter Kleiweg, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. So how serious are plans to remove things from Python, like
    lambda and map and reduce? I am just starting out with Python
    and if there is a danger that the programs I write today won't
    work next year, I rather invest my time in another language. I
    might try Ruby, or stick with Perl.


    --
    Peter Kleiweg L:NL,af,da,de,en,ia,nds,no,sv,(fr,it) S:NL,de,en,(da,ia)
    info: http://www.let.rug.nl/~kleiweg/ls.html
     
    Peter Kleiweg, Aug 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. Peter Kleiweg

    Ville Vainio Guest

    >>>>> "Peter" == Peter Kleiweg <> writes:

    Peter> So how serious are plans to remove things from Python, like
    Peter> lambda and map and reduce? I am just starting out with Python

    Not very. Talking about it is mostly a way to steer newbies away from
    them towards superior approaches (list comprehensions and generator
    expressions). Even if the features were removed, they could be
    trivially implemented by yourself in python so none of your code would
    break. Well, noe lambda but I don't believe it will be removed - too
    much code depends on it.

    Peter> and if there is a danger that the programs I write today
    Peter> won't work next year, I rather invest my time in another
    Peter> language. I might try Ruby, or stick with Perl.

    Well, if you care about running your code on the new interpreters few
    years from now (nobody is going to force you to upgrade - some poor
    tossers still use python 1.5.2), Python is the best bet from the
    languages you mention. Ruby is going to break compatibility big time
    soon (or so I've heard - big rewrite or sth), and perl is going
    through the perl6 pains. Python is extremely cautious about breaking
    backwards compatibility, sometimes even too cautious for my taste...

    --
    Ville Vainio http://tinyurl.com/2prnb
     
    Ville Vainio, Aug 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. Peter Kleiweg

    Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    Peter Kleiweg <> wrote:
    >
    >So how serious are plans to remove things from Python, like lambda and
    >map and reduce? I am just starting out with Python and if there is a
    >danger that the programs I write today won't work next year, I rather
    >invest my time in another language. I might try Ruby, or stick with
    >Perl.


    It's serious. OTOH, they'll stay in the language until Python 3.0 comes
    out, and there's nobody forcing you to upgrade. The useful lifespan of
    a Python version seems to be about three or four years (my company just
    switched from Python 1.5.2 to Python 2.2, so we'll be two full versions
    out of date by the end of the year).
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    "To me vi is Zen. To use vi is to practice zen. Every command is a
    koan. Profound to the user, unintelligible to the uninitiated. You
    discover truth everytime you use it."
     
    Aahz, Aug 22, 2004
    #3
  4. On 21 Aug 2004 23:42:32 -0400, Aahz <> wrote:
    > It's serious. OTOH, they'll stay in the language until Python 3.0 comes
    > out, and there's nobody forcing you to upgrade. The useful lifespan of
    > a Python version seems to be about three or four years (my company just
    > switched from Python 1.5.2 to Python 2.2, so we'll be two full versions
    > out of date by the end of the year).


    Note also that Python 3.0 (aka Python 3000) isn't even close to being
    started - I suspect we're at least 4 or 5 years from it happening. And
    there's still going to be at least a couple more major releases in the 2.x
    cycle before then.

    See PEP 3000 for the current collection of ideas for Python 3.0.

    Anthony
     
    Anthony Baxter, Aug 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Peter Kleiweg

    John J. Lee Guest

    Peter Kleiweg <> writes:

    > So how serious are plans to remove things from Python, like
    > lambda and map and reduce? I am just starting out with Python
    > and if there is a danger that the programs I write today won't
    > work next year, I rather invest my time in another language. I
    > might try Ruby, or stick with Perl.


    Won't happen until Python 3.0. When / if 3.0 comes out (more than
    five years away), I'm sure people will continue to maintain 2.x for a
    long time after that.


    John
     
    John J. Lee, Aug 22, 2004
    #5
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