Book Suggestions

Discussion in 'C++' started by Materialised, Sep 15, 2004.

  1. Materialised

    Materialised Guest

    Hi All,

    I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    C++ standard well.
    I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much
    source code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete
    Reference (4th Edition) as a reference where needed.

    I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th
    Edition) and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.
    I do have a few questions:

    1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    works for me then it is ok right? I mean, I wont fall into any serious
    traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library functions.

    2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?

    3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its
    release? (November 2002)

    Thanks for any replies
    Mick

    --
    perl -e 'printf "%silto%c%sal%c%s%ccodegurus%corg%c", "ma", 58, "mw",
    107, 'er', 64, 46, 10;'
     
    Materialised, Sep 15, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Materialised wrote:
    > I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    > C++ standard well.
    > I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much
    > source code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete
    > Reference (4th Edition) as a reference where needed.
    >
    > I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th
    > Edition) and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.


    NNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Get a good book. Get a book from a reputable author (authors). See
    www.accu.org, the book review section, for the recommended books.

    > I do have a few questions:
    >
    > 1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    > works for me then it is ok right?


    You will have to define "works" here before your question can be answered.

    > I mean, I wont fall into any serious
    > traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library functions.


    Why not just get a _good_ reference? Like Nicolai Josuttis' "The C++
    Standard Library", for example.

    > 2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?


    The sheer name of the author is enough to answer "no" to this, based
    on the reputation he earned with his other creations.

    > 3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its
    > release? (November 2002)


    This question is only valid if the answer to (2) is "yes". And, no,
    there were no _major_ changes to the Standard in 2003, but there were
    _some_.

    Victor
     
    Victor Bazarov, Sep 15, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "Materialised" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    > C++ standard well.
    > I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much source
    > code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete Reference (4th
    > Edition) as a reference where needed.
    >
    > I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th Edition)
    > and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.
    > I do have a few questions:
    >
    > 1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    > works for me then it is ok right? I mean, I wont fall into any serious
    > traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library functions.
    >
    > 2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?
    >
    > 3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its release?
    > (November 2002)
    >


    I think possible you are mistaken in your thoughts about what it takes to
    learn C++. Learning C++ is not about primarily about learning a few concepts
    and standard library functions. I can see how learning C would have seemed
    mostly to be like that. But C++ is a much more about learning the styles of
    programming that work well with it, e.g. object oriented programming and
    generic programming. C++ is also a very idiomatic language and it has many
    many 'gotchas'. So I would get a book that teaches you C++ style not a
    reference to its standard library (although that wouldn't hurt). Accelerated
    C++ by Koenig and Moo is often recommended for someone in your position.

    John
     
    John Harrison, Sep 15, 2004
    #3
  4. Materialised

    Materialised Guest

    Victor Bazarov wrote:
    > Materialised wrote:
    >
    >> I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover
    >> the C++ standard well.
    >> I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much
    >> source code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete
    >> Reference (4th Edition) as a reference where needed.
    >>
    >> I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th
    >> Edition) and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.

    >
    >
    > NNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >
    > Get a good book. Get a book from a reputable author (authors). See
    > www.accu.org, the book review section, for the recommended books.
    >
    >> I do have a few questions:
    >>
    >> 1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    >> works for me then it is ok right?

    >
    >
    > You will have to define "works" here before your question can be answered.
    >
    > > I mean, I wont fall into any serious

    >
    >> traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library
    >> functions.

    >
    >
    > Why not just get a _good_ reference? Like Nicolai Josuttis' "The C++
    > Standard Library", for example.
    >
    >> 2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?

    >
    >
    > The sheer name of the author is enough to answer "no" to this, based
    > on the reputation he earned with his other creations.
    >
    >> 3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its
    >> release? (November 2002)

    >
    >
    > This question is only valid if the answer to (2) is "yes". And, no,
    > there were no _major_ changes to the Standard in 2003, but there were
    > _some_.
    >
    > Victor

    Im looking for a good book really, that will cover the full standard and
    STL, while providing examples on the usage (as Schildt's did.)

    Does the book you suggested cover this? I have read the review and can't
    decide if it does or not. Or would I also need to purchise C++ Standard
    Library: A Tutorial & Reference by the same author?


    --
    perl -e 'printf "%silto%c%sal%c%s%ccodegurus%corg%c", "ma", 58, "mw",
    107, 'er', 64, 46, 10;'
     
    Materialised, Sep 15, 2004
    #4
  5. Materialised

    Materialised Guest

    John Harrison wrote:
    > "Materialised" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Hi All,
    >>
    >>I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    >>C++ standard well.
    >>I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much source
    >>code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete Reference (4th
    >>Edition) as a reference where needed.
    >>
    >>I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th Edition)
    >>and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.
    >>I do have a few questions:
    >>
    >>1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    >>works for me then it is ok right? I mean, I wont fall into any serious
    >>traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library functions.
    >>
    >>2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?
    >>
    >>3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its release?
    >>(November 2002)
    >>

    >
    >
    > I think possible you are mistaken in your thoughts about what it takes to
    > learn C++. Learning C++ is not about primarily about learning a few concepts
    > and standard library functions. I can see how learning C would have seemed
    > mostly to be like that. But C++ is a much more about learning the styles of
    > programming that work well with it, e.g. object oriented programming and
    > generic programming. C++ is also a very idiomatic language and it has many
    > many 'gotchas'. So I would get a book that teaches you C++ style not a
    > reference to its standard library (although that wouldn't hurt). Accelerated
    > C++ by Koenig and Moo is often recommended for someone in your position.
    >
    > John
    >
    >

    Great, and its half price on Amazon at the moment. The reviews on it
    make it look like its exactly what I am looking for. Thanks.
    (for anyone else who wants it check out
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...760/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl/026-9945000-9793212
    )
    --
    perl -e 'printf "%silto%c%sal%c%s%ccodegurus%corg%c", "ma", 58, "mw",
    107, 'er', 64, 46, 10;'
     
    Materialised, Sep 15, 2004
    #5
  6. "Materialised" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    > C++ standard well.


    The best source for information about the C++ standard is the C++ standard,
    which you can buy from ANSI in PDF form for $18, or from your favorite
    bookstore in paper form for $65 (ask for ISBN 0-470-84674-7).

    If you're looking for tutorial books, you might check the reviews in
    www.accu.org
     
    Andrew Koenig, Sep 15, 2004
    #6
  7. Materialised wrote:
    > [..]
    > Im looking for a good book really, that will cover the full standard and
    > STL, while providing examples on the usage (as Schildt's did.)
    >
    > Does the book you suggested cover this? I have read the review and can't
    > decide if it does or not. Or would I also need to purchise C++ Standard
    > Library: A Tutorial & Reference by the same author?


    That's the same one.

    V
     
    Victor Bazarov, Sep 15, 2004
    #7
  8. Materialised

    Materialised Guest

    Materialised wrote:
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    > C++ standard well.
    > I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much
    > source code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete
    > Reference (4th Edition) as a reference where needed.
    >
    > I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th
    > Edition) and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.
    > I do have a few questions:
    >
    > 1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    > works for me then it is ok right? I mean, I wont fall into any serious
    > traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library functions.
    >
    > 2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?
    >
    > 3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its
    > release? (November 2002)
    >
    > Thanks for any replies
    > Mick
    >

    Ok, all done and dusted. I have ordered the following 2 books from Amazon.

    "Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example (C++ in Depth S.)"

    and

    "The C++ Standard" British Standards Institute;Hardcover;

    I would have paid to download the PDF version of the latter, but to be
    honest, although computers are great and some belive that books may soon
    be a thing of the past, I much prefer reading from books than a computer
    screen, and also the lack of toner for my printer, would have ended up
    making it just expensive to print it. lol

    I would like to thank all who answered for your suggestions.


    --
    perl -e 'printf "%silto%c%sal%c%s%ccodegurus%corg%c", "ma", 58, "mw",
    107, 'er', 64, 46, 10;'
     
    Materialised, Sep 15, 2004
    #8
  9. Hi,

    Materialised did utter the following words of wisdom:

    > Im looking for a good book really, that will cover the full standard and
    > STL, while providing examples on the usage (as Schildt's did.)


    Schildt may supply examples on the usage. Whether they work as they
    should, are explained correctly or actually compile is another matter.

    Schildt == very bad.

    TTFN

    Paul

    --
    "There are four stages to any war
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you
    Then they fight you, then YOU win."
    Ghandi
     
    Paul F. Johnson, Sep 15, 2004
    #9
  10. Materialised

    Greg Comeau Guest

    In article <>,
    Materialised <> wrote:
    >I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    >C++ standard well.
    >I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much
    >source code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete
    >Reference (4th Edition) as a reference where needed.
    >
    >I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th
    >Edition) and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.
    >I do have a few questions:
    >
    >1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    >works for me then it is ok right? I mean, I wont fall into any serious
    >traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library functions.
    >
    >2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?


    Even ignoring comments you will no doubt received about these books,
    I'd like to offer you some caution about just getting one book.
    Get many. See http://www.comeaucomputing.com/booklist
    and http://www.accu.org for suggestions

    >3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its
    >release? (November 2002)


    Some Defects in Standard C++ have been officially fixed with C++03,
    though compilers are still catching up with those, and in trying
    to meet C++98.
    --
    Greg Comeau / Comeau C++ 4.3.3, for C++03 core language support
    Comeau C/C++ ONLINE ==> http://www.comeaucomputing.com/tryitout
    World Class Compilers: Breathtaking C++, Amazing C99, Fabulous C90.
    Comeau C/C++ with Dinkumware's Libraries... Have you tried it?
     
    Greg Comeau, Sep 15, 2004
    #10
  11. Materialised

    Unforgiven Guest

    "Materialised" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I would have paid to download the PDF version of the latter, but to be
    > honest, although computers are great and some belive that books may soon
    > be a thing of the past, I much prefer reading from books than a computer
    > screen, and also the lack of toner for my printer, would have ended up
    > making it just expensive to print it. lol


    http://www.eink.com/
    ^_^

    --
    Unforgiven
     
    Unforgiven, Sep 15, 2004
    #11
  12. Materialised

    bla abla Guest

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 19:34:27 +0100, Materialised
    <> wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    > C++ standard well.


    <snip>

    There are free online alternatives like: thinking in
    C++ (http://www.mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html)
    I have a copy of Bjarne Stroustrupp's C++ programming language (Stroustrup
    is the creator of C++), its verry complete (as it is the ansi/iso
    standard) and with good examples and exercises. I've also read a book on
    object-oriented programming in general (not bound to C++). This is not a
    bad idea to do, so u will definitely see the benefits an oo design can
    have, and to be sure to have the right mind-set when designing classes.

    grtz
    Emile
     
    bla abla, Sep 17, 2004
    #12
  13. Materialised

    Guest

    Materialised <> wrote in message news:<>...
    [re: Koenig and Moo, Accelerated C++]
    > Great, and its half price on Amazon at the moment. The reviews on it
    > make it look like its exactly what I am looking for. Thanks.


    Why is it that every time I buy a book, like magic, within only
    a couple years, it shows up half price on Amazon. </sarcasm>
    Socks
     
    , Sep 17, 2004
    #13
  14. Materialised

    Archer Guest

    "The C++ Programming Language (Special Edition)"
    or "C++ Primer" would suit for you!
    "Materialised" <> дÈëÏûÏ¢
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I'm just looking for some suggestions on a good book that will cover the
    > C++ standard well.
    > I Know C (quite) well, and learnt this language by reading as much
    > source code as possible and using Herbert Schildt's C The Complete
    > Reference (4th Edition) as a reference where needed.
    >
    > I was thinking about purchasing C++: The Complete Reference (4th
    > Edition) and attempting to learn C++ in a similar way.
    > I do have a few questions:
    >
    > 1) I know many people dismiss these books as being rubbish, but if it
    > works for me then it is ok right? I mean, I wont fall into any serious
    > traps when only using it as a reference to the standard library functions.
    >
    > 2) Is this book up to date with the newest ANSI/ISO Standards?
    >
    > 3) Has there been any major changes to the C++ Standard since its
    > release? (November 2002)
    >
    > Thanks for any replies
    > Mick
    >
    > --
    > perl -e 'printf "%silto%c%sal%c%s%ccodegurus%corg%c", "ma", 58, "mw",
    > 107, 'er', 64, 46, 10;'
     
    Archer, Sep 18, 2004
    #14
  15. Materialised

    jeffc Guest

    "Materialised" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I would have paid to download the PDF version of the latter, but to be
    > honest, although computers are great and some belive that books may soon
    > be a thing of the past...


    I doubt it.
     
    jeffc, Sep 20, 2004
    #15
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