Books on applied algorithms with less theory/proofs?

Discussion in 'Java' started by david.karr, Jun 26, 2008.

  1. david.karr

    david.karr Guest

    I would like to find some book resources that focus on applied
    algorithms, but that focus less on theory and proofs. It would be
    good if code samples were in Java. I'd also like it if exercises had
    answers, and not just the answer, but the explanation of the answer.
    Can anyone recommend any? I slogged through "Introduction to
    Algorithms", but it fell short on some of the things I've described
    here. I've noticed "Algorithms in Java" (and I saw Joseph Ottinger's
    brief review), but I don't know how close it comes to what I'm looking
    for.

    Just to put a finer point on this, I'm not looking for a book that
    talks about how to implement all the common data structure algorithms,
    I'm looking for a book that talks about certain problems, and how to
    approach solutions to them using common algorithms. I'm not asking
    for this just so I can get better at typical weird interview questions
    (although that would be a nice benefit), I'm just trying to expand my
    horizons in this direction, which I believe I'm somewhat weak in.
    david.karr, Jun 26, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. david.karr

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Thu, 26 Jun 2008 10:04:12 -0700 (PDT), "david.karr"
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
    someone who said :

    >I would like to find some book resources that focus on applied
    >algorithms, but that focus less on theory and proofs.


    see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/algorithms.html
    for some candidates. My budget did not allow be to buy all those
    books. I have a copy of Knuth, but none of the others.
    --

    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    The Java Glossary
    http://mindprod.com
    Roedy Green, Jun 26, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. david.karr

    Lew Guest

    On Jun 26, 1:04 pm, "david.karr" <> wrote:
    > I would like to find some book resources that focus on applied
    > algorithms, but that focus less on theory and proofs.  It would be
    > good if code samples were in Java.  I'd also like it if exercises had
    > answers, and not just the answer, but the explanation of the answer.
    > Can anyone recommend any?  I slogged through "Introduction to
    > Algorithms", but it fell short on some of the things I've described
    > here. I've noticed "Algorithms in Java" (and I saw Joseph Ottinger's
    > brief review), but I don't know how close it comes to what I'm looking
    > for.
    >
    > Just to put a finer point on this, I'm not looking for a book that
    > talks about how to implement all the common data structure algorithms,
    > I'm looking for a book that talks about certain problems, and how to
    > approach solutions to them using common algorithms.  I'm not asking
    > for this just so I can get better at typical weird interview questions
    > (although that would be a nice benefit), I'm just trying to expand my
    > horizons in this direction, which I believe I'm somewhat weak in.


    I found quite a few books, many of them highly recommended in the
    industry and most with sample chapters or passages available on line,
    via
    <http://www.google.com/search?q=Java+algorithms+book>

    GIYF.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Jun 26, 2008
    #3
  4. On Thu, 26 Jun 2008 10:04:12 -0700, david.karr wrote:

    > I would like to find some book resources that focus on applied
    > algorithms, but that focus less on theory and proofs. It would be
    > good if code samples were in Java.
    >

    I have two fairly old favourites:

    Sedgewick: Algorithms (pub Addison-Wesley)
    Nicolas Wirth: Algorithms + Data Structures = Programs

    Both present a good range of algorithms using Pascal to present the code.
    There's a bit of overlap, but not too much. That said, if I had just one
    of them it would be Sedgewick. His code is clear and readily translated.

    I once transcribed his red-black balanced tree code into C directly from
    the book and it worked pretty much straight off and was very much faster
    than that in the standard C library, which was the reason for using it: by
    the time I'd finished optimising memory management I could grow a large
    tree (500,000 nodes) some 30 times faster than library code could do it.
    The difference was due to the speed of the Mach kernel's memory allocation
    routines and the vast number of tiny bits the library code insisted on
    requesting.


    --
    martin@ | Martin Gregorie
    gregorie. |
    org | Zappa fan & glider pilot
    Martin Gregorie, Jun 27, 2008
    #4
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. HDL Book Seller
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    889
    HDL Book Seller
    Dec 1, 2004
  2. Barak
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    793
    Barak
    Aug 7, 2003
  3. Guest

    Books, Books, Books...

    Guest, Sep 19, 2004, in forum: C++
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    491
    ÁÍÄÑÅÁÓ ÔÁÓÏÕËÁÓ
    Sep 19, 2004
  4. jiajia wu
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    340
    jiajia wu
    Oct 1, 2009
  5. 6668
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    135
Loading...

Share This Page