Books/texts

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Rodrigo Dominguez, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. Can you give me some recomendations about intermediate/avanzed texts/books
    links for c programming?

    Another question (I know that it's not c programming, but it's very related
    to it). When you have to build a medium/big system with c, what do you use
    to analyze the system? links/books?

    Thank you very much

    Rodrigo Dominguez
     
    Rodrigo Dominguez, Dec 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. Rodrigo Dominguez

    Dan Pop Guest

    In <bqpvut$25ktpk$-berlin.de> Rodrigo Dominguez <> writes:

    >Can you give me some recomendations about intermediate/avanzed texts/books
    >links for c programming?


    K&R2. If, after mastering it and solving all the exercises you still feel
    the need for a more advanced text, you can use the C standard.

    >Another question (I know that it's not c programming, but it's very related
    >to it). When you have to build a medium/big system with c, what do you use
    >to analyze the system? links/books?


    My brain.

    Dan
    --
    Dan Pop
    DESY Zeuthen, RZ group
    Email:
     
    Dan Pop, Dec 5, 2003
    #2
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  3. On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 14:04:09 +0000, Dan Pop wrote:

    > In <bqpvut$25ktpk$-berlin.de> Rodrigo Dominguez
    > <> writes:
    >
    >>Can you give me some recomendations about intermediate/avanzed
    >>texts/books links for c programming?

    >
    > K&R2. If, after mastering it and solving all the exercises you still
    > feel the need for a more advanced text, you can use the C standard.


    Since he asked he probably didn't know that K&R2 is clc-speak for
    Kernighan & Ritchie, The C programming language, second edition.

    Now he does I hope.

    --
    NPV

    "the large print giveth, and the small print taketh away"
    Tom Waits - Step right up
     
    Nils Petter Vaskinn, Dec 5, 2003
    #3
  4. Rodrigo Dominguez

    Dan Pop Guest

    In <> "Nils Petter Vaskinn" <> writes:

    >On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 14:04:09 +0000, Dan Pop wrote:
    >
    >> In <bqpvut$25ktpk$-berlin.de> Rodrigo Dominguez
    >> <> writes:
    >>
    >>>Can you give me some recomendations about intermediate/avanzed
    >>>texts/books links for c programming?

    >>
    >> K&R2. If, after mastering it and solving all the exercises you still
    >> feel the need for a more advanced text, you can use the C standard.

    >
    >Since he asked he probably didn't know that K&R2 is clc-speak for
    >Kernighan & Ritchie, The C programming language, second edition.


    It's well documented in the newsgroup's FAQ.

    Dan
    --
    Dan Pop
    DESY Zeuthen, RZ group
    Email:
     
    Dan Pop, Dec 5, 2003
    #4
  5. Rodrigo Dominguez wrote:

    > Can you give me some recomendations about intermediate/avanzed texts/books
    > links for c programming?


    Like Dan said, K&R2 is a must-have. If that doesn't kill enough trees
    for you, check out C Unleashed by Richard Heathfield, et al.

    Here's a page of C links:

    http://www.lysator.liu.se/c/

    That's about the only thing I found in my bookmarks, other than a link
    to the FAQ for this group (which is also linked from the link given).

    Random note about that link: the first thing it lists is a link to a
    draft of the C99 standard. Look for a newer version, n869, instead. You
    can probably find it with Google.

    >
    > Another question (I know that it's not c programming, but it's very related
    > to it). When you have to build a medium/big system with c, what do you use
    > to analyze the system? links/books?
    >


    Not really sure what you mean by that. You can use static code analysis
    tools like Splint to check for possible errors, if that's what you mean.
    Creating a large system is largely a matter of finding a reasonable way
    to break it down into smaller, modularized components, then often
    repeating the process for those components until you are left with
    manageable chunks (though you might have an unmanageably high number of
    those chunks - but the point of modularization is that you only need to
    worry about a small number of them at a time).

    At least, that's one way of looking at it.

    -Kevin
    --
    My email address is valid, but changes periodically.
    To contact me please use the address from a recent posting.
     
    Kevin Goodsell, Dec 5, 2003
    #5
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