C and Network

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Aleramo, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. Aleramo

    Aleramo Guest

    I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    that could:
    1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    the computers i could access with my identity;
    2) give me the possibility to choose one computer i can access, to
    have the list of directories and files on C (for Windows) or in the
    Home (for Linux).

    I hope it's possible writing it with some functions in a library,
    because i like C and i don't want to change it with another language.

    Bye bye Marco.
    Aleramo, Aug 13, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Aleramo

    Lew Pitcher Guest

    On Aug 13, 3:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    > I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    > that could:
    > 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    > the computers i could access with my identity;


    Not with Standard C. You'd need networking-specific extensions to do
    that.
    For details, you'll have to ask in a group that deals with the
    development of networking code on your platform.

    > 2) give me the possibility to choose one computer i can access, to
    > have the list of directories and files on C (for Windows) or in the
    > Home (for Linux).


    Not with Standard C. You'd need networking-specific extensions to do
    that.
    For details, you'll have to ask in a group that deals with the
    development of networking code on your platform. I suggest
    comp.os.linux.networking and/or comp.os.linux.development.apps (for
    Linux) and one of the comp.os.ms-windows.* newsgroups (for Windows)

    > I hope it's possible writing it with some functions in a library,
    > because i like C and i don't want to change it with another language.


    You'll likely find a library somewhere. But, unfortunately, not here.
    Sorry

    > Bye bye Marco.
    Lew Pitcher, Aug 13, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Aleramo

    Doug Guest

    On Aug 13, 8:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    > I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    > that could:
    > 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    > the computers i could access with my identity;
    > 2) give me the possibility to choose one computer i can access, to
    > have the list of directories and files on C (for Windows) or in the
    > Home (for Linux).
    >
    > I hope it's possible writing it with some functions in a library,
    > because i like C and i don't want to change it with another language.
    >
    > Bye bye Marco.


    Hi Marco,

    You'll soon be receiving lots of "we can't help you here" responses.
    Sorry about that. You can indeed do what you require in C, though not
    standard C. So I'm supposed to point you to other newsgroups where
    you can ask more directed questions.

    I'll try to give you some pointers, though. I won't bother pointing
    out other newsgroups directly - I'm sure you can find them easily
    enough. If you can write C, which it sounds like you can, then that
    won't be a problem.

    If this is a fun, personal, project, then I'd do this with a server-
    client type approach. You'll need to use some non-standard-C stuff to
    get the job done:
    - you'll want a client and a server process. For communication over a
    typical network you'll need to know about "sockets". Google and read
    up on it over several cases of beer; expect it to take a while.
    You'll also need this for your network discovery - finding the other
    machines you care about.
    - on the servers, you'll need to know how to access the local
    filesystem. Google readdir, I'm sure it'll point you to the
    equivalents on other platforms
    - try and write the code so that the pieces involved in the above are
    isolated and can be easily substituted depending on your OS. This
    will give you some element of portability.

    If this is not for fun, if you just need to get something running:
    - if it doesn't need to be homegrown, maybe samba would work for the
    platforms you care about. There are other platform specific utilities
    (like network shares on windows) that can do the job. At the client
    end, the details could be hidden behind a simple CLI script.
    - on some OSes (windows is the only one I know about for sure) there
    are calls I believe you can make to ask the remote computer to tell
    you what you want to know. I'm afraid I don't know much about it,
    though. Newsgroups might help here.

    Again, this is all very OT here. I'm going to duck now.

    Hope that helps,
    Doug
    Doug, Aug 13, 2007
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    Aleramo <> wrote:
    >I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    >that could:
    >1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    >the computers i could access with my identity;


    In addition to Lew's correct comments about networking being OS
    specific, the answer to (1) is NO: in the general case, it
    is not possible to identify the servers and computers on a local network.
    No matter what program you run, there is always the possibility that
    the remote systems are deliberately refusing to reply to your
    computer in particular, or that the remote systems are deliberately
    refusing to reply to anyone who doesn't present the proper secret
    authentication sequence. There is no guaranteed method to provoke
    a remote computer to reveal its existance if it doesn't want to
    talk to you.

    [getting OT]

    *If* you know that the computers/servers are in particular address
    ranges, then the general way to find out which computers you could
    access with your identity, is to try each address in sequence,
    attempting an access with your identity on each; the ones that
    respond with positive confirmation are the ones you can access,
    the ones that do not respond with positive confirmation either
    don't exist or don't allow you access with your identity.

    If you do not know the address ranges of the computers/servers
    in your local network... well, you could try each of
    the roughly 3.7 billion valid IPv4 addresses in turn, but it would
    take a long time and your network administrator is unlikely
    to be pleased with you (!!!)


    Some systems -advertise- their existance and potential availability for
    certain kind of accesses, and it is *relatively* easy to write
    an OS-specific program to pay attention to those advertisements.
    You generally wouldn't bother, though -- you'd generally just use
    a program that someone's already written for the purpose. And
    knowing which systems -advertise- access potential is quite a different
    question than knowing which non-advertising systems would let you
    have access.
    --
    Prototypes are supertypes of their clones. -- maplesoft
    Walter Roberson, Aug 13, 2007
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    Doug <> wrote:
    >On Aug 13, 8:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    >> I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    >> that could:
    >> 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    >> the computers i could access with my identity;


    >Hi Marco,


    >You'll soon be receiving lots of "we can't help you here" responses.
    >Sorry about that. You can indeed do what you require in C, though not
    >standard C.


    No you cannot. It is not POSSIBLE in the general case. Think
    firewalls. You cannot identify the computers on a local network
    if they refuse to talk to you or to any system that you have
    access to.

    To emphasize this further: if I'm on Marco's network, and I
    turn off networking on my computer, then my computer is still
    in the local network, but it is impossible to reach, so it cannot
    be identified as being present, not by any means short of physical
    enumeration.
    --
    "law -- it's a commodity"
    -- Andrew Ryan (The Globe and Mail, 2005/11/26)
    Walter Roberson, Aug 13, 2007
    #5
  6. Aleramo

    CBFalconer Guest

    Doug wrote:
    > On Aug 13, 8:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    >
    >> I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    >> that could:
    >> 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    >> the computers i could access with my identity;
    >> 2) give me the possibility to choose one computer i can access, to
    >> have the list of directories and files on C (for Windows) or in the
    >> Home (for Linux).
    >>
    >> I hope it's possible writing it with some functions in a library,
    >> because i like C and i don't want to change it with another language.

    >
    > You'll soon be receiving lots of "we can't help you here" responses.
    > Sorry about that. You can indeed do what you require in C, though not
    > standard C. So I'm supposed to point you to other newsgroups where
    > you can ask more directed questions.
    >
    > I'll try to give you some pointers, though. I won't bother pointing
    > out other newsgroups directly - I'm sure you can find them easily
    > enough. If you can write C, which it sounds like you can, then that
    > won't be a problem.


    Don't do this. Experts on the advice you give are not
    (necessarily) present here, so mistakes will not get corrected.
    You should limit your advice to pointing out suitable newsgroups.

    --
    Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
    <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    CBFalconer, Aug 13, 2007
    #6
  7. Aleramo

    Doug Guest

    On Aug 13, 8:53 pm, -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson)
    wrote:
    > In article <>,
    >
    > Doug <> wrote:
    > >On Aug 13, 8:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    > >> I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    > >> that could:
    > >> 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    > >> the computers i could access with my identity;

    > >Hi Marco,
    > >You'll soon be receiving lots of "we can't help you here" responses.
    > >Sorry about that. You can indeed do what you require in C, though not
    > >standard C.

    >
    > No you cannot. It is not POSSIBLE in the general case. Think
    > firewalls. You cannot identify the computers on a local network
    > if they refuse to talk to you or to any system that you have
    > access to.


    <snip>

    Agreed, there's no way to do it in the general case. I was assuming
    that the OP had control over his own local network. I assume he's not
    an idiot and knows this too. He talked about identity, so I assume he
    at least expects authentication and authorisation to play a part.

    But you're right, he should just give up.

    Doug
    Doug, Aug 13, 2007
    #7
  8. Aleramo

    Aleramo Guest

    On 13 Ago, 21:39, Doug <> wrote:
    > On Aug 13, 8:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    >
    > > I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    > > that could:
    > > 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    > > the computers i could access with my identity;
    > > 2) give me the possibility to choose one computer i can access, to
    > > have the list of directories and files on C (for Windows) or in the
    > > Home (for Linux).

    >
    > > I hope it's possible writing it with some functions in a library,
    > > because i like C and i don't want to change it with another language.

    >
    > > Bye bye Marco.

    >
    > Hi Marco,
    >
    > You'll soon be receiving lots of "we can't help you here" responses.
    > Sorry about that. You can indeed do what you require in C, though not
    > standard C. So I'm supposed to point you to other newsgroups where
    > you can ask more directed questions.
    >
    > I'll try to give you some pointers, though. I won't bother pointing
    > out other newsgroups directly - I'm sure you can find them easily
    > enough. If you can write C, which it sounds like you can, then that
    > won't be a problem.
    >
    > If this is a fun, personal, project, then I'd do this with a server-
    > client type approach. You'll need to use some non-standard-C stuff to
    > get the job done:
    > - you'll want a client and a server process. For communication over a
    > typical network you'll need to know about "sockets". Google and read
    > up on it over several cases of beer; expect it to take a while.
    > You'll also need this for your network discovery - finding the other
    > machines you care about.
    > - on the servers, you'll need to know how to access the local
    > filesystem. Google readdir, I'm sure it'll point you to the
    > equivalents on other platforms
    > - try and write the code so that the pieces involved in the above are
    > isolated and can be easily substituted depending on your OS. This
    > will give you some element of portability.
    >
    > If this is not for fun, if you just need to get something running:
    > - if it doesn't need to be homegrown, maybe samba would work for the
    > platforms you care about. There are other platform specific utilities
    > (like network shares on windows) that can do the job. At the client
    > end, the details could be hidden behind a simple CLI script.
    > - on some OSes (windows is the only one I know about for sure) there
    > are calls I believe you can make to ask the remote computer to tell
    > you what you want to know. I'm afraid I don't know much about it,
    > though. Newsgroups might help here.
    >
    > Again, this is all very OT here. I'm going to duck now.
    >
    > Hope that helps,
    > Doug


    My boss gave me this problem to solve with the safety it could be
    possible. I had some doubts but he was so safe that i preferred
    trying. He was so safe he told me i could solve it for Windows but i
    had understood there are some chances for Linux and no for Win.
    I think i have to change language, i think at C# he assured me it can
    do it. I'll try.

    Thank you to everybody :)
    Aleramo, Aug 14, 2007
    #8
  9. Aleramo

    SM Ryan Guest

    Aleramo <> wrote:
    # On 13 Ago, 21:39, Doug <> wrote:
    # > On Aug 13, 8:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    # >
    # > > I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    # > > that could:
    # > > 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    # > > the computers i could access with my identity;
    # > > 2) give me the possibility to choose one computer i can access, to
    # > > have the list of directories and files on C (for Windows) or in the
    # > > Home (for Linux).

    # > - you'll want a client and a server process. For communication over a
    # > typical network you'll need to know about "sockets". Google and read
    # > up on it over several cases of beer; expect it to take a while.
    # > You'll also need this for your network discovery - finding the other
    # > machines you care about.

    # My boss gave me this problem to solve with the safety it could be
    # possible. I had some doubts but he was so safe that i preferred
    # trying. He was so safe he told me i could solve it for Windows but i
    # had understood there are some chances for Linux and no for Win.
    # I think i have to change language, i think at C# he assured me it can
    # do it. I'll try.

    Also sockets generally assume they're talking between specific,
    known machines. To communicate to anybody on a network without
    knowing who they are beforehand might depend on broadcasts or
    other protocols such as ethernet. I think DHCP or Apple's Bonjour
    are supposed to do this; perhaps those could give you some ideas.

    I don't know if C# is implemented on Linux.

    --
    SM Ryan http://www.rawbw.com/~wyrmwif/
    OOOOOOOOOO! NAVY SEALS!
    SM Ryan, Aug 14, 2007
    #9
  10. Aleramo

    Richard Bos Guest

    Aleramo <> wrote:

    > My boss gave me this problem to solve with the safety it could be
    > possible. I had some doubts but he was so safe that i preferred

    ^^^^
    This is not the translation of "sicuro" you are looking for.

    > trying. He was so safe he told me i could solve it for Windows but i
    > had understood there are some chances for Linux and no for Win.


    He doesn't know what he's talking about.

    It _is_ generally possible, on both Windows and Unixoids, _if_ you can
    assume a friendly network. However, both these solutions require non-ISO
    extensions, and different ones, at that. As for "changes for Linux, no
    for Windows" - if you assume POSIX as the most usual extension standard
    for C, it's exactly the other way 'round.

    > I think i have to change language, i think at C#


    *Shudder* Why not go the whole hog and switch to Visual Basic? That way
    at least you'll _know_ that it won't ever work properly on anything but
    specific versions of MS Windows.

    Richard
    Richard Bos, Aug 14, 2007
    #10
  11. Aleramo

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, CBFalconer
    <> writes
    >Doug wrote:
    >> On Aug 13, 8:10 pm, Aleramo <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I want to know if it's possible writing in the C-Language a program
    >>> that could:
    >>> 1) identify the servers and computers in a local network, and knowing
    >>> the computers i could access with my identity;
    >>> 2) give me the possibility to choose one computer i can access, to
    >>> have the list of directories and files on C (for Windows) or in the
    >>> Home (for Linux).
    >>>
    >>> I hope it's possible writing it with some functions in a library,
    >>> because i like C and i don't want to change it with another language.

    >>
    >> You'll soon be receiving lots of "we can't help you here" responses.
    >> Sorry about that. You can indeed do what you require in C, though not
    >> standard C. So I'm supposed to point you to other newsgroups where
    >> you can ask more directed questions.
    >>
    >> I'll try to give you some pointers, though. I won't bother pointing
    >> out other newsgroups directly - I'm sure you can find them easily
    >> enough. If you can write C, which it sounds like you can, then that
    >> won't be a problem.

    >
    >Don't do this. Experts on the advice you give are not
    >(necessarily) present here,


    They may well be and you have no idea what expertise most of us have.

    > so mistakes will not get corrected.

    No more than on any other NG.

    >You should limit your advice to pointing out suitable newsgroups.

    This is one of them.


    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    Chris Hills, Aug 15, 2007
    #11
  12. Chris Hills said:

    > In article <>, CBFalconer
    > <> writes


    <snip>

    >>Don't do this. Experts on the advice you give are not
    >>(necessarily) present here,

    >
    > They may well be and you have no idea what expertise most of us have.


    That's the problem. The best newsgroup to ask questions about <foo> is a
    newsgroup where the regular contributors are known to have expertise
    about <foo>. For a network programming question, that would be a
    network programming newsgroup. This is a great newsgroup for C
    questions, but a lousy group for other kinds of questions.

    >> so mistakes will not get corrected.

    > No more than on any other NG.


    Not so. On a network programming newsgroup, the local experts are far
    more likely to spot, and correct, wrongful advice about network
    programming than is the case here in comp.lang.c. This is common sense.

    >>You should limit your advice to pointing out suitable newsgroups.

    > This is one of them.


    Not for the OP's question, it isn't.

    --
    Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    Email: -www. +rjh@
    Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
    Richard Heathfield, Aug 15, 2007
    #12
  13. Aleramo

    Richard Guest

    Richard Heathfield <> writes:

    > Chris Hills said:
    >
    >> In article <>, CBFalconer
    >> <> writes

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>>Don't do this. Experts on the advice you give are not
    >>>(necessarily) present here,

    >>
    >> They may well be and you have no idea what expertise most of us have.

    >
    > That's the problem. The best newsgroup to ask questions about <foo> is a
    > newsgroup where the regular contributors are known to have expertise
    > about <foo>. For a network programming question, that would be a
    > network programming newsgroup. This is a great newsgroup for C
    > questions, but a lousy group for other kinds of questions.
    >
    >>> so mistakes will not get corrected.

    >> No more than on any other NG.

    >
    > Not so. On a network programming newsgroup, the local experts are far
    > more likely to spot, and correct, wrongful advice about network
    > programming than is the case here in comp.lang.c. This is common sense.
    >
    >>>You should limit your advice to pointing out suitable newsgroups.

    >> This is one of them.

    >
    > Not for the OP's question, it isn't.


    If someone helps him , then it is.

    Jesus H Christ. Give it a rest. Let "OT" threads die of their own
    accord. Change the bloody record already. There are more net nanny posts
    from self appointed Godz own in this group than in the rest of usenet
    together.
    Richard, Aug 15, 2007
    #13
  14. Aleramo

    Doug Guest

    CBFalconer wrote:
    > Doug wrote:


    <snip>

    > > You'll soon be receiving lots of "we can't help you here" responses.
    > > Sorry about that. You can indeed do what you require in C, though not
    > > standard C. So I'm supposed to point you to other newsgroups where
    > > you can ask more directed questions.
    > >
    > > I'll try to give you some pointers, though. I won't bother pointing
    > > out other newsgroups directly - I'm sure you can find them easily
    > > enough. If you can write C, which it sounds like you can, then that
    > > won't be a problem.

    >
    > Don't do this. Experts on the advice you give are not
    > (necessarily) present here, so mistakes will not get corrected.
    > You should limit your advice to pointing out suitable newsgroups.


    I think that's pretty much what I did. Except that instead of blindly
    giving him the name or names of some newsgroups, I gave him some
    background info so he could find them himself. Or find some non-
    newsgroup help, like a book. Or realise there are existing tools
    which already do it ("what is it you're really trying to do?").

    I understand your sentiment, but given the lack of any detail in my
    post, I find it hard to see how it applies. It fits into the self-
    aggrandising, net-nanny category.

    I'm sure you'll disagree, and I'm sorry about that, but there you go.

    Now, I really do have better things to do than take part in one of
    these stupid net-nanny threads. Which is what this, and just about
    every other post in clc, has become.

    Doug
    Doug, Aug 15, 2007
    #14
  15. Doug said:

    <snip>

    > Now, I really do have better things to do than take part in one of
    > these stupid net-nanny threads.


    So do we all.

    > Which is what this, and just about every other post in clc, has
    > become.


    If people posted in the right newsgroup in the first place, this would
    not be the case. For my own part, I'd rather be discussing C than
    topicality. Wouldn't you?

    --
    Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    Email: -www. +rjh@
    Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
    Richard Heathfield, Aug 15, 2007
    #15
  16. Aleramo

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Richard <>
    writes
    >Richard Heathfield <> writes:
    >
    >> Chris Hills said:
    >>
    >>> In article <>, CBFalconer
    >>> <> writes

    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>>>Don't do this. Experts on the advice you give are not
    >>>>(necessarily) present here,
    >>>
    >>> They may well be and you have no idea what expertise most of us have.

    >>
    >> That's the problem. The best newsgroup to ask questions about <foo> is a
    >> newsgroup where the regular contributors are known to have expertise
    >> about <foo>. For a network programming question, that would be a
    >> network programming newsgroup. This is a great newsgroup for C
    >> questions, but a lousy group for other kinds of questions.
    >>
    >>>> so mistakes will not get corrected.
    >>> No more than on any other NG.

    >>
    >> Not so. On a network programming newsgroup, the local experts are far
    >> more likely to spot, and correct, wrongful advice about network
    >> programming than is the case here in comp.lang.c. This is common sense.
    >>
    >>>>You should limit your advice to pointing out suitable newsgroups.
    >>> This is one of them.

    >>
    >> Not for the OP's question, it isn't.

    >
    >If someone helps him , then it is.
    >
    >Jesus H Christ. Give it a rest. Let "OT" threads die of their own
    >accord. Change the bloody record already. There are more net nanny posts
    >from self appointed Godz own in this group than in the rest of usenet
    >together.


    The OT net nannies are generating more OT traffic and noise here than
    anything else.

    If they shut up there would be far fewer OT posts. More to the point
    some of the "OT" posters would come back and inject some more life and
    people into this NG with more ON topic posts.


    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    Chris Hills, Aug 15, 2007
    #16
  17. Chris Hills said:

    <snip>

    > The OT net nannies are generating more OT traffic and noise here than
    > anything else.


    No, the noise is from people who don't understand what the topic is, and
    you appear to be one of them. Those you disparagingly call "net
    nannies" are just trying to stop the group following clc++ into a chaos
    from which that group took years to emerge. You know all this, and yet
    you persist in trying to damage the group.

    > If they shut up there would be far fewer OT posts.


    No, there would be far more, and eventually we'd be swamped by them, and
    there'd be nowhere left to discuss standard C.

    > More to the point
    > some of the "OT" posters would come back and inject some more life
    > and people into this NG with more ON topic posts.


    I disagree. OT posters are not known for posting on-topic posts.

    --
    Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    Email: -www. +rjh@
    Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
    Richard Heathfield, Aug 15, 2007
    #17
  18. Aleramo

    Richard Guest

    Richard Heathfield <> writes:

    > Doug said:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> Now, I really do have better things to do than take part in one of
    >> these stupid net-nanny threads.

    >
    > So do we all.
    >
    >> Which is what this, and just about every other post in clc, has
    >> become.

    >
    > If people posted in the right newsgroup in the first place, this would
    > not be the case. For my own part, I'd rather be discussing C than
    > topicality. Wouldn't you?


    Then do it. You really don't get it do you?
    Richard, Aug 15, 2007
    #18
  19. Aleramo

    Richard Guest

    Richard Heathfield <> writes:

    > Chris Hills said:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> The OT net nannies are generating more OT traffic and noise here than
    >> anything else.

    >
    > No, the noise is from people who don't understand what the topic is, and
    > you appear to be one of them. Those you disparagingly call "net


    Heathfield simply can't help himself. His self opinion is of legendary
    proportions.

    > nannies" are just trying to stop the group following clc++ into a chaos
    > from which that group took years to emerge. You know all this, and yet
    > you persist in trying to damage the group.


    He is a knowledgeable and helpful poster. Someone YOU could learn
    from. Instead you persist in wrapping the simplest things in high level
    mumbo jumbo more designed to demonstrate your own cleverness than to
    help the nOOb.

    >
    >> If they shut up there would be far fewer OT posts.

    >
    > No, there would be far more, and eventually we'd be swamped by them, and
    > there'd be nowhere left to discuss standard C.


    Rubbish. Just ignore them.

    You see it's very simple : if a post is OT and then there are 5 "OT
    replies" then there are 6 OT posts. Get it yet?

    >
    >> More to the point
    >> some of the "OT" posters would come back and inject some more life
    >> and people into this NG with more ON topic posts.

    >
    > I disagree. OT posters are not known for posting on-topic posts.


    Depends how Off Topic.
    Richard, Aug 15, 2007
    #19
  20. In article <4all.nl>,
    Richard Bos <> wrote:
    >Aleramo <> wrote:


    >> My boss gave me this problem to solve with the safety it could be
    >> possible.


    >He doesn't know what he's talking about.


    >It _is_ generally possible, on both Windows and Unixoids, _if_ you can
    >assume a friendly network.


    [OT]

    A *very* friendly network. An *extrodinarily* friendly network.

    Richard, have you ever actually -been- a network administrator
    on a non-trivial network (say, more than 256 hosts) ? I have,
    and I was pretty good at it -- but there were times when it would
    take weeks or months to track down certain devices that would appear
    for short times and then disappear, even though we were using
    "fully managed" network infrastructure. See for example,

    http://groups.google.ca/group/comp.dcom.lans.ethernet/msg/af01a32555eb5660


    The point being that unless you have full complete taps on all of your
    switches, you -cannot- identify all the "servers and computers" on a
    network (the first thing requested by the original poster) -- and even
    with full taps, you might not be able to locate some devices that seem
    to appear. With less than full taps, using software monitoring
    techniques such as SNMP monitoring to examine the switch and routing
    tables, you simply will not be able to find all of your computers,
    even ones that talk occasionally.

    I'm not just "being contrary": I worked -hard- in networking for a
    decade. Identifying the computers on a network is, in practice,
    a difficult job, requiring a lot of analysis and cross-correlation --
    and requiring a deep appreciation for the unfortunate truth that,
    "Switches Lie!"


    The OP's task would be considerably easier if the OP restricted themselves
    to computers that announce themselves on the local network,
    such as via NETBIOS; for that kind of effort, probably looking
    at the samba functionality (as mentioned by a previous poster)
    would be fruitful.
    --
    Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new? It hath
    been already of old time, which was before us. -- Ecclesiastes
    Walter Roberson, Aug 15, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Kal
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    9,517
    Kevin Spencer
    Jun 21, 2004
  2. Jane Davis

    Network Service account over network

    Jane Davis, Jun 22, 2005, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    439
    Kevin Spencer
    Jun 22, 2005
  3. Bill Volk
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    3,144
    Bill Volk
    Jul 2, 2003
  4. kin
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    914
  5. king
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    274
Loading...

Share This Page