c and webservices?

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by h, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. h

    h Guest

    Is it possible to consume web services with c? If not, what other
    languages would be needed to accomplish this?

    H
     
    h, Jan 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. h said:

    > Is it possible to consume web services with c?


    Sure, given an appropriate library. All you need to do now is find a
    newsgroup supporting your platform, so that you can ask about appropriate
    libraries for that platform.

    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
    http://www.cpax.org.uk
    email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
     
    Richard Heathfield, Jan 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. h

    Chuck F. Guest

    h wrote:
    >
    > Is it possible to consume web services with c? If not, what other
    > languages would be needed to accomplish this?


    Not efficiently. You need spider. Try www.spiderosity.org. Also
    read spider.man and whatwebsweweave.com

    --
    "If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
    More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
     
    Chuck F., Jan 4, 2006
    #3
  4. h

    pawel_lesik Guest

    yes it is possible for example with gSOAP
     
    pawel_lesik, Jan 4, 2006
    #4
  5. h

    Flash Gordon Guest

    pawel_lesik wrote:
    > yes it is possible for example with gSOAP


    Please provide context when posting. See
    http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/ for reasons and instructions on how to
    do this.

    Also, please don't give off topic advice without at least redirecting
    the OP to a more appropriate group. Since I am currently involved in
    doing web service stuff I can definitely say that gSOAP is not always
    the answer, and C is not always the best language. The OP should
    therefore investigate what the options are for his/her platform and
    discus them somewhere they are topical, which is not here.
    --
    Flash Gordon
    Living in interesting times.
    Although my email address says spam, it is real and I read it.
     
    Flash Gordon, Jan 4, 2006
    #5
  6. h

    h Guest

    Thank you everyone,


    Richard, thanks, are there any suggestions you could give me that might
    lead me to libraries for the windows platform?

    Chuck, I checked out whatwebsweweave.com, thanks for the resource,
    however, spiderosity.org doesn't exist, and I'm not sure where I should
    look for spider.man.

    pawel, thanks, I appreciate your help, I will look into gSOAP, I also
    found http://www.sqldata.com/, ever hear of that one?

    Thanks for taking the time guys,

    H
     
    h, Jan 4, 2006
    #6
  7. h

    h Guest

    Flash Gordon, I apologize for my mistakes, however, my question seems
    very well within the knowledge base of this group, and so I'm gaining
    alot of insight into my problem. My question pertains to the C
    language, so to be quite honest I really don't know where else to go.
    What would your suggestion be?

    H
     
    h, Jan 4, 2006
    #7
  8. In article <>, "h" <> writes:
    > Is it possible to consume web services with c?


    Yes, if by "consume" you mean either "invoke" or "provide". Both are
    possible in C. They may even be possible entirely in portable C,
    given a sufficiently flexible definition of "web services" or a
    sufficiently generous implementation.

    For most applications, however, you would have to use facilities
    outside the C standard (which is what we discuss here), such as an
    API for network communications.

    I suggest that rather than reinventing the wheel, you look for a C
    web services client or server implementation that suits your needs,
    or at least for libraries that provide facilities such as HTTP and
    XML parsing. Further discussion along those lines would be off-topic
    for comp.lang.c and probably better directed to a newsgroup for your
    target platform.

    --
    Michael Wojcik

    We are subdued to what we work in. (E M Forster)
     
    Michael Wojcik, Jan 4, 2006
    #8
  9. h <> wrote:

    > Flash Gordon, I apologize for my mistakes, however, my question seems
    > very well within the knowledge base of this group, and so I'm gaining
    > alot of insight into my problem. My question pertains to the C
    > language, so to be quite honest I really don't know where else to go.


    1. Please quote properly:

    It is proper Usenet etiquette to include the relevant portions of the text
    you are replying to. To do this using Google groups, please follow the
    instructions below, penned by Keith Thompson:

    If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers.

    2. Please read

    http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt
    http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
    http://benpfaff.org/writings/clc/off-topic.html

    --
    Christopher Benson-Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
    ataru(at)cyberspace.org | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
     
    Christopher Benson-Manica, Jan 4, 2006
    #9
  10. h

    Flash Gordon Guest

    h wrote:
    > Flash Gordon, I apologize for my mistakes, however, my question seems
    > very well within the knowledge base of this group, and so I'm gaining
    > alot of insight into my problem. My question pertains to the C
    > language, so to be quite honest I really don't know where else to go.


    No, your question mainly pertains to the availability of libraries for
    your specific platform. The C language has absolutely no abilities for
    the most fundamental things required for a web service, such as
    communications over a network.

    Perhaps I should start asking here how to work out where the horizon is
    in am image given the altitude and attitude of the aircraft a camera is
    mounted together with the HFOV VFOV and LDA of the camera? After all,
    that is a C question because the code is required in C (code I actually
    had to design and write, so it's not an invented example).

    Perhaps I should ask people here about how to port ffdev and fred from
    Linux to Windows? After all, they are written in C using libraries
    written in C so surely that is a C question? (It is also a real question
    and one I am part way through addressing)

    Do you see the point yet? If not I'm sure I could come up with hundreds
    more questions about libraries that are designed to be called from C
    which 90% or more of the people here would have no knowledge of and
    which, in reality, are nothing to do with C but instead to do with
    implementation specifics or specific libraries which are not part of C.
    Then I could flood the group with so many such questions that you would
    not be able to find the actual C questions for all the non-C questions.

    On the other hand, we could stick to talking about C which is what this
    group is for, then if I have a problem with some badly written C code
    that I will have to port to a true 64 bit system one day, and I want to
    ask how to achieve in portable C things for which the code currently
    uses dirty tricks, there will still be a few of the C experts around
    that can help me come up with answers to my C questions.

    > What would your suggestion be?


    Since in another post you have asked about Windows you could try a
    Windows group of which there are many including
    microsoft.public.msdn.soaptoolkit. There they might tell you about
    things written to take advantage of the MS specific libraries (I know MS
    have an interest in SOAP). For more general discussions about
    programming there is also comp.programming
    --
    Flash Gordon
    Living in interesting times.
    Although my email address says spam, it is real and I read it.
     
    Flash Gordon, Jan 4, 2006
    #10
  11. h

    pemo Guest

    "h" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is it possible to consume web services with c? If not, what other
    > languages would be needed to accomplish this?


    Anything can be done in C [more or less - and even then it's 'moot'], the
    library/language you're using is possibly written in C, as is your OS.
    However, if you're looking for a webservices C based API, well, Google's
    your best mate [?].
     
    pemo, Jan 4, 2006
    #11
  12. h

    Chuck F. Guest

    h wrote:
    >
    > Is it possible to consume web services with c? If not, what
    > other languages would be needed to accomplish this?


    It is quite possible that my earlier reply with foolish references
    to spiders was inappropriate, and that your use of 'consume' was
    due to a language difficulty, rather than a desire to create DOS
    software. If this is the case I apologize.

    --
    "If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
    More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
     
    Chuck F., Jan 4, 2006
    #12
  13. h said:

    > Thank you everyone,
    >
    >
    > Richard, thanks, are there any suggestions you could give me that might
    > lead me to libraries for the windows platform?


    Sure - why not check out the comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32 newsgroup?
    I reckon they'll either know, or at least be able to point you in the right
    direction. Please note: if you really, really need a library that is
    accessible from C, then make this clear to them. (The MS crowd are off on a
    COM/CLR nightmare trip right now, and it may take them some time to come
    down long enough to put their C hats back on for the duration of your
    question.)

    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
    http://www.cpax.org.uk
    email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
     
    Richard Heathfield, Jan 5, 2006
    #13
  14. h

    h Guest

    > Perhaps I should start asking here how to work out where the horizon is
    > in am image given the altitude and attitude of the aircraft a camera is
    > mounted together with the HFOV VFOV and LDA of the camera? After all,
    > that is a C question because the code is required in C (code I actually
    > had to design and write, so it's not an invented example).


    Very interesting example, and it certainly forces me to rethink alot of
    assumptions I've had about the C language.

    > Perhaps I should ask people here about how to port ffdev and fred from
    > Linux to Windows? After all, they are written in C using libraries
    > written in C so surely that is a C question? (It is also a real question
    > and one I am part way through addressing)


    > Do you see the point yet?


    Yes.

    > If not I'm sure I could come up with hundreds
    > more questions about libraries that are designed to be called from C
    > which 90% or more of the people here would have no knowledge of and
    > which, in reality, are nothing to do with C but instead to do with
    > implementation specifics or specific libraries which are not part of C.
    > Then I could flood the group with so many such questions that you would
    > not be able to find the actual C questions for all the non-C questions.


    I don't know what 'libraries that are designed to be called from C'
    are, and further I don't know how these libraries implementation
    specifics pertain to the misuse of google groups, however, I have no
    doubt that you're correct.

    > On the other hand, we could stick to talking about C which is what this
    > group is for, then if I have a problem with some badly written C code
    > that I will have to port to a true 64 bit system one day, and I want to
    > ask how to achieve in portable C things for which the code currently
    > uses dirty tricks, there will still be a few of the C experts around
    > that can help me come up with answers to my C questions.


    Yes, it's clear that only C experts should be having discussions in
    this group. Anyone new to the language, or with little to no
    understanding of the flexibility doesn't even know enough about the
    language to even post. I would say, as part of group etiquette, people
    that don't know what they're doing should be treated with attention to
    tact.

    > Since in another post you have asked about Windows you could try a
    > Windows group of which there are many including
    > microsoft.public.msdn.soaptoolkit. There they might tell you about
    > things written to take advantage of the MS specific libraries (I know MS
    > have an interest in SOAP). For more general discussions about
    > programming there is also comp.programming


    The other users of the group have provided me with the information I
    need in order to accomplish my task.

    Everyone else, thank you for your courtesy,

    H
     
    h, Jan 5, 2006
    #14
  15. Flash Gordon said:

    > h wrote:
    >> Flash Gordon, I apologize for my mistakes, however, my question seems
    >> very well within the knowledge base of this group, and so I'm gaining
    >> alot of insight into my problem. My question pertains to the C
    >> language, so to be quite honest I really don't know where else to go.

    >
    > No, your question mainly pertains to the availability of libraries for
    > your specific platform. The C language has absolutely no abilities for
    > the most fundamental things required for a web service, such as
    > communications over a network.


    h: Flash is basically right.

    Flash: A heavily over-the-top response, IMHO, especially given the apology
    in the first line of h's reply. There's such a thing as overdoing it.

    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
    http://www.cpax.org.uk
    email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
     
    Richard Heathfield, Jan 5, 2006
    #15
  16. h

    Flash Gordon Guest

    h wrote:

    <snip>

    >> On the other hand, we could stick to talking about C which is what this
    >> group is for, then if I have a problem with some badly written C code
    >> that I will have to port to a true 64 bit system one day, and I want to
    >> ask how to achieve in portable C things for which the code currently
    >> uses dirty tricks, there will still be a few of the C experts around
    >> that can help me come up with answers to my C questions.

    >
    > Yes, it's clear that only C experts should be having discussions in
    > this group. Anyone new to the language, or with little to no
    > understanding of the flexibility doesn't even know enough about the
    > language to even post. I would say, as part of group etiquette, people
    > that don't know what they're doing should be treated with attention to
    > tact.


    Sorry for being heavy handed. Like anyone, I sometimes have a bad day at
    the office and can over-react.

    Asking whether something is part of the C language is not unreasonable,
    but insisting something is a question about C when the main item you
    need is assistance in either selecting or using third party libraries.

    I do seriously think that, as you are using Windows, you check out the
    toolkits MS provide, hence my pointing you at the
    microsoft.public.msdn.soaptoolkit as well.
    --
    Flash Gordon
    Living in interesting times.
    Although my email address says spam, it is real and I read it.
     
    Flash Gordon, Jan 5, 2006
    #16
  17. In article <-gordon.me.uk>, Flash Gordon <> writes:
    >
    > The C language has absolutely no abilities for
    > the most fundamental things required for a web service, such as
    > communications over a network.


    This is arguably true (there's a possible quibble over "fundamental"
    and "required"), but not necessarily relevant. While network
    communication is "fundamental" to web services, that does not mean
    that a provider or consumer of web services need be responsible for
    network communications.

    Consider, for example, a portable C program running in an environment
    where stdin and stdout are the required network communications
    channel. Such environments are actually very common: inetd and its
    analogues, CGI programs, and so forth. (There are client-side
    examples as well.)

    It might not be practical, for most applications, to provide or
    consume web services entirely in portable C, in an environment where
    this is possible; but I'd like to avoid the false generalization that
    any task (such as using web services) which is associated with some
    facility outside the C standard therefore cannot be done in portable
    C. Even here we must entertain various unguaranteed expectations
    about the execution environment, QoI, and so forth.

    I'm of the opinion that the original question itself was marginally
    topical (if considered as "can this be done in standard C?"), but
    answers other than redirections to implementation-specific groups
    or those that describe what standard C does not provide (eg network
    communications, XML parsing, etc) would be off-topic. h's claim
    of topicality for the larger question ("how can this be done in C?")
    on the grounds that all C programs are topical is spurious, of
    course, for the reasons you outline and we're all familiar with, but
    it's legitimate (again, IMO) for someone to ask here whether some
    task *can* be accomplished in standard C. And in that event I for
    one would prefer to see responses that are a bit more cautious in
    delimiting what is and is not covered by the standard language.

    An ideal response, in my opinion, might be along the lines of "it is
    possible, in some environments, to consume web services in a portable
    C program, which is what we discuss here; but in practice you are
    likely to want to use implementation- and environment-specific
    features and facilities, and you should ask about those in a news-
    group relevant to your platform".

    --
    Michael Wojcik

    Unlikely prediction o' the day:
    Eventually, every programmer will have to write a Java or distributed
    object program.
    -- Orfali and Harkey, _Client / Server Programming with Java and CORBA_
     
    Michael Wojcik, Jan 6, 2006
    #17
  18. (Michael Wojcik) writes:
    > In article <-gordon.me.uk>, Flash Gordon
    > <> writes:
    >> The C language has absolutely no abilities for
    >> the most fundamental things required for a web service, such as
    >> communications over a network.

    >
    > This is arguably true (there's a possible quibble over "fundamental"
    > and "required"), but not necessarily relevant. While network
    > communication is "fundamental" to web services, that does not mean
    > that a provider or consumer of web services need be responsible for
    > network communications.
    >
    > Consider, for example, a portable C program running in an environment
    > where stdin and stdout are the required network communications
    > channel. Such environments are actually very common: inetd and its
    > analogues, CGI programs, and so forth. (There are client-side
    > examples as well.)

    [snip]

    The manner in which the network communications channel is associated
    with stdin and stdout is implementation-specific and non-portable --
    but of course the manner in which *anything* is associated with stdin
    and stdout is implementation-specific and non-portable.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
     
    Keith Thompson, Jan 6, 2006
    #18
  19. h

    h Guest

    Hi Michael,

    Thank you for your input, I've learned alot from your response.

    > I'm of the opinion that the original question itself was marginally
    > topical (if considered as "can this be done in standard C?"), but
    > answers other than redirections to implementation-specific groups
    > or those that describe what standard C does not provide (eg network
    > communications, XML parsing, etc) would be off-topic. h's claim
    > of topicality for the larger question ("how can this be done in C?")
    > on the grounds that all C programs are topical is spurious, of
    > course, for the reasons you outline and we're all familiar with, but
    > it's legitimate (again, IMO) for someone to ask here whether some
    > task *can* be accomplished in standard C.


    I want to clarify that I was very careful with my wording. Since that
    was misunderstood, I will say in other words: I meant that I didn't
    know whether my question would be appropriate for this forum; this,
    resulting from my lack of understanding with C, is no claim of
    topicality, it's a claim of rather ignorance.

    > And in that event I for
    > one would prefer to see responses that are a bit more cautious in
    > delimiting what is and is not covered by the standard language.


    I think this is key for someone in my position, where I don't know
    where the bounding lines are drawn.

    > An ideal response, in my opinion, might be along the lines of "it is
    > possible, in some environments, to consume web services in a portable
    > C program, which is what we discuss here; but in practice you are
    > likely to want to use implementation- and environment-specific
    > features and facilities, and you should ask about those in a news-
    > group relevant to your platform".


    The web service must be consumed in a portable C program. The
    application engine is written in portable C. The webservice pertains
    from the necessity of a license control implementation that is to be
    made; it will basically identify that the client machine is using a
    valid license, nothing elaborate.


    Hi Keith,

    > The manner in which the network communications channel is associated
    > with stdin and stdout is implementation-specific and non-portable --
    > but of course the manner in which *anything* is associated with stdin
    > and stdout is implementation-specific and non-portable.


    Now I'm a bit confused, there seems to be alot of controversy over the
    portability of these network communication channels. Your statement
    renders my idea impossible. I appreciate your response.

    Thanks everyone,

    H
     
    h, Jan 10, 2006
    #19
  20. "h" <> writes:
    [...]
    > Hi Keith,
    >
    >> The manner in which the network communications channel is associated
    >> with stdin and stdout is implementation-specific and non-portable --
    >> but of course the manner in which *anything* is associated with stdin
    >> and stdout is implementation-specific and non-portable.

    >
    > Now I'm a bit confused, there seems to be alot of controversy over the
    > portability of these network communication channels. Your statement
    > renders my idea impossible. I appreciate your response.


    To be perhaps a bit clearer:

    Standard C has absolutely no support for networking. That doesn't
    mean it's impossible to write networking code in C (obviously a great
    deal of networking code is written in C); it just means it's
    impossible to write networking code in C without using system-specific
    extensions.

    If you can arrange for the environment in which your program runs to
    associate any necessary network communications channels with your
    program's stdin and/or stdout, you may be able to write your program
    in 100% standard C, perhaps even strictly conforming C. But it's not
    clear that it would be worth the effort. You're going to have to do
    *some* system-specific work regardless; keeping the system
    dependencies entirely out of your C program may or may not make sense.

    It should be possible to write networking code that's not 100%
    portable C, but that's probably as portable as you need it to be. The
    POSIX standard, though it's off-topic here, provides facilities for
    networking and a number of other operating system interfaces. If your
    code is expected to run only on POSIX-compliant systems, you can use
    the POSIX-defined interfaces and your program will still be "portable
    enough". The comp.unix.programmer newsgroup is probably the best
    place to ask about this.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
     
    Keith Thompson, Jan 10, 2006
    #20
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