C++ bible?

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Eyegor, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. Eyegor

    Eyegor Guest

    Hello all.
    I've learned C about 7 years ago and the book i've learned by was the
    Schildt 6th edition. I was told by many that the Schieldt is a very
    bad text to learn C by. It was the required text for CS102 course...

    Anyhow, I think its time for me to learn C++ and while at it refresh
    my knowledge of C. What book would you suggest to buy? I am mostly
    interested in Standard C++, if there is such a thing... I am one of
    the old school scientists who think that performance and efficiency is
    the key. I am trying to learn C++ to then learn C++ driven OpenCL and
    Stream libraries.

    Thanks
    Eyegor, Oct 23, 2010
    #1
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  2. Eyegor

    Eyegor Guest

    On Oct 23, 6:58 pm, Eyegor <> wrote:
    > Hello all.
    > I've learned C about 7 years ago and the book i've learned by was the
    > Schildt 6th edition. I was told by many that the Schieldt is a very
    > bad text to learn C by. It was the required text for CS102 course...
    >
    > Anyhow, I think its time for me to learn C++ and while at it refresh
    > my knowledge of C. What book would you suggest to buy? I am mostly
    > interested in Standard C++, if there is such a thing... I am one of
    > the old school scientists who think that performance and efficiency is
    > the key. I am trying to learn C++ to then learn C++ driven OpenCL and
    > Stream libraries.
    >
    > Thanks


    By the way, I don't care as much about GUIs as I do about number
    crunching and data flow.
    Eyegor, Oct 24, 2010
    #2
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  3. Eyegor

    Ian Collins Guest

    On 10/24/10 11:58 AM, Eyegor wrote:
    >
    > Anyhow, I think its time for me to learn C++ and while at it refresh
    > my knowledge of C. What book would you suggest to buy? I am mostly
    > interested in Standard C++,


    You should ask this on comp.lang.c++, no c.l.c.

    --
    Ian Collins
    Ian Collins, Oct 24, 2010
    #3
  4. Eyegor

    Eyegor Guest

    On Oct 23, 7:13 pm, Ian Collins <> wrote:
    > On 10/24/10 11:58 AM, Eyegor wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Anyhow, I think its time for me to learn C++ and while at it refresh
    > > my knowledge of C. What book would you suggest to buy? I am mostly
    > > interested in Standard C++,

    >
    > You should ask this on comp.lang.c++, no c.l.c.
    >
    > --
    > Ian Collins


    thanks, Reposted there.
    Eyegor, Oct 24, 2010
    #4
  5. Eyegor

    Jon Guest

    Eyegor wrote:
    > Hello all.
    > I've learned C about 7 years ago and the book i've learned by was the
    > Schildt 6th edition. I was told by many that the Schieldt is a very
    > bad text to learn C by. It was the required text for CS102 course...
    >
    > Anyhow, I think its time for me to learn C++ and while at it refresh
    > my knowledge of C. What book would you suggest to buy? I am mostly
    > interested in Standard C++, if there is such a thing... I am one of
    > the old school scientists who think that performance and efficiency is
    > the key. I am trying to learn C++ to then learn C++ driven OpenCL and
    > Stream libraries.
    >


    I think this is a very good question to ask in a C group because I think
    it may give a more "experienced" answer (consider that some people
    *start* with C++ and that those are more likely to be found in the C++
    groups while in a C group you're *very* likely to find those who know
    both languages) and certainly less political one ("language wars", job
    security, lawsuits, etc.).

    I don't know if you are trolling, but it bears some resemblence to such.
    Anyway though, I'll answer. The "standard" (not to be confused with any
    PL standard) answer is that there is no *one* book that will do. I
    started with Stroustrup's second edition of "The C++ Programming
    Language" (I was rejecting C++ in my late C days when the ARM was a
    popular book, at least until I knew more about it). There is a current
    version that is probably the thing to get if it's written in the same
    style.(BS is quite adept at writing technical material, it appears). Oh,
    scrap that recommendation: just because I found that book a good starting
    point (along with J. Coplien's "Advanced C++"), doesn't mean it will be
    good for you or be true "in the large" or "at large" (I'll have to look
    up those 2 things someday). I've gotten the most use out of Stroustrup's
    "D&E", but I'm more interested in language design than using C++
    (especially these days).

    OK, I just wrote all the above and I know it's probably useless since I
    learned/used C++ in the early/mid nineties (and decreasingly ever since
    in favor of my own constructions and plans and am currently
    developing/implementing a new language). Anyway, without knowing what
    your goals are, it's hard (if not impossible) to make a recommendation
    even if anyone could. Bookstores used to be a great place to perusal
    books like those, but they have long since succumbed to training manuals
    for those supporting the big companies and their products (at least
    *they* have a job?). You can borrow many good books from your local
    library. Online info is spotty at best and some of the most seemingly
    "authoritative" sites are nothing but propaganda. I like Wikipedia for
    high-level (and even some low-level) R&D, but that is only and
    introduction for you, I think.

    So, about C++ today: as I am learning currently assembly language (for
    need to do so), I don't think C++ is usuable without at least an
    inline-assembler (note that 64-bit Visual C++ has *ELIMINATED* this
    highly needed feature, so plan your/the future accordingly). You won't
    realize that until you are years into it (well, maybe it's easier these
    days. Surely it is.).

    On learning C++: yeah, do it, but have a lot of salt handy.
    Jon, Oct 26, 2010
    #5
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