C++ Book required for ex C / C++ / Perl developer to recap / learn

Discussion in 'C++' started by barfle, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. barfle

    barfle Guest

    I developed in C full time from 1989 - 1998 or so.

    Since then I have been writing a fair bit of C++ but I still feel I
    write it in a 'C' type way as I have never had any formal C++
    training.

    I am familiar with the principles of classes , operator overloading,
    virtual functions, templates etc etc and have done some worjk using
    the STL. However it has mostly been maintenance of existing code and I
    haven't had much recent experience of designing and producing a
    working project from scratch, implementing the principles of C++ and
    efficiently and fully using new functionality. I need to get myself
    thinking in C++ rather C.

    I'm now between jobs so I have a bit of time to brush up on my skills
    and am going to set myself a project (200 hours development time) so
    that I can assess exactly which C++ areas I am strong and weak in.

    I'm looking for a book which will help me along with this ,
    particularly one with some emphasis on OOD which I haven't used much
    (although I have written some OO Perl ) and a lot of good exercises so
    that I can assess how much I have picked up / forgotten.
    I have both Windows and Unix experience and would like something that
    is not too biased towards either platform ( I will be working on
    Windows for this project)

    Most of the books I have seen seem to be written for C++ developers
    who have no prior C experience and therefore waste a lot of space on
    the C basics which is not great for people like me who have a strong C
    background.

    I'd be grateful if anyone here could come up with any good
    recommendations . I have sourched the web and relevant forums but have
    yet to come up with an oustanding candidate.

    The books I currently have are

    Teach yourself C++ - Jesse Liberty - SAMS
    C++ for programmers - Ammeraal - WPC
    Effective STL - Meyers - Addison Wesley
    Practical C++ Programming - Oualline - O'Reilly
    C++ : The Core Language - Satir + Brown -O'Reilly

    I am a fan of O'Reilly books - I have the O'Reilly Perl CD Bookshelf
    (6 of the Perl books on CD ) and it is excellent.

    I was thinking of getting O'Reilly C++ Cookbook and C++ in a nutshell
    (on offer on amazon if bought together) since I found the Perl
    Cookbook excellent.

    Anyone have any good recommendations ?

    Many thanks in advance
     
    barfle, Mar 21, 2007
    #1
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  2. barfle

    mlimber Guest

    On Mar 21, 5:41 am, "barfle" <> wrote:
    > I developed in C full time from 1989 - 1998 or so.
    >
    > Since then I have been writing a fair bit of C++ but I still feel I
    > write it in a 'C' type way as I have never had any formal C++
    > training.
    >
    > I am familiar with the principles of classes , operator overloading,
    > virtual functions, templates etc etc and have done some worjk using
    > the STL. However it has mostly been maintenance of existing code and I
    > haven't had much recent experience of designing and producing a
    > working project from scratch, implementing the principles of C++ and
    > efficiently and fully using new functionality. I need to get myself
    > thinking in C++ rather C.
    >
    > I'm now between jobs so I have a bit of time to brush up on my skills
    > and am going to set myself a project (200 hours development time) so
    > that I can assess exactly which C++ areas I am strong and weak in.
    >
    > I'm looking for a book which will help me along with this ,
    > particularly one with some emphasis on OOD which I haven't used much
    > (although I have written some OO Perl ) and a lot of good exercises so
    > that I can assess how much I have picked up / forgotten.
    > I have both Windows and Unix experience and would like something that
    > is not too biased towards either platform ( I will be working on
    > Windows for this project)
    >
    > Most of the books I have seen seem to be written for C++ developers
    > who have no prior C experience and therefore waste a lot of space on
    > the C basics which is not great for people like me who have a strong C
    > background.
    >
    > I'd be grateful if anyone here could come up with any good
    > recommendations . I have sourched the web and relevant forums but have
    > yet to come up with an oustanding candidate.
    >
    > The books I currently have are
    >
    > Teach yourself C++ - Jesse Liberty - SAMS
    > C++ for programmers - Ammeraal - WPC
    > Effective STL - Meyers - Addison Wesley
    > Practical C++ Programming - Oualline - O'Reilly
    > C++ : The Core Language - Satir + Brown -O'Reilly
    >
    > I am a fan of O'Reilly books - I have the O'Reilly Perl CD Bookshelf
    > (6 of the Perl books on CD ) and it is excellent.
    >
    > I was thinking of getting O'Reilly C++ Cookbook and C++ in a nutshell
    > (on offer on amazon if bought together) since I found the Perl
    > Cookbook excellent.
    >
    > Anyone have any good recommendations ?
    >
    > Many thanks in advance


    With your background, you might do well with the Creator's tome: _The C
    ++ Programming Language_ 3rd ed, by Stroustrup.

    For more of a tutorial style, I'd highly recommend _Accelerated C++_
    by Koenig and Moo, which teaches C++ from the ground up the right way
    (e.g., it introduces vectors and strings up front and leaves pointers
    and arrays to the end; cf. FAQ 34.1). It's short, and it's the best of
    it's kind IMHO.

    For advanced techniques, you may also want to get something like
    _Modern C++ Design_ by Alexandrescu, which shows how to use OO design
    patterns effectively in C++, but it is not for those who are not
    already somewhat comfortable with using templates.

    You can also find many book reviews at accu.org, and see these FAQs on
    learning OO/C++:

    http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite/how-to-learn-cpp.html

    Cheers! --M
     
    mlimber, Mar 21, 2007
    #2
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  3. barfle

    BobR Guest

    barfle <> wrote in message...
    > I developed in C full time from 1989 - 1998 or so.
    >
    > Since then I have been writing a fair bit of C++ but I still feel I
    > write it in a 'C' type way as I have never had any formal C++
    > training.
    >[snip]
    > I'd be grateful if anyone here could come up with any good
    > recommendations . I have sourched the web and relevant forums but have
    > yet to come up with an oustanding candidate.
    > The books I currently have are
    >
    > Teach yourself C++ - Jesse Liberty - SAMS
    > C++ for programmers - Ammeraal - WPC
    > Effective STL - Meyers - Addison Wesley
    > Practical C++ Programming - Oualline - O'Reilly
    > C++ : The Core Language - Satir + Brown -O'Reilly
    >[snip]
    > Anyone have any good recommendations ?
    > Many thanks in advance
    >


    In *addition* to the other books suggested (mlimber):

    Get "Thinking in C++", 2nd ed. Volume 1&2 by Bruce Eckel
    (available for free here. You can buy it in hardcopy too.):
    http://www.mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html

    --
    Bob R
    POVrookie
    --
    Dev-C++ IDE: http://www.bloodshed.net/
    MinGW (GNU compiler): http://www.mingw.org/
    MinGWStudio http://www.parinyasoft.com/
    wxWidgets URL: http://www.wxwidgets.org
    Alf P. Steinbach's "Pointers" document:
    http://home.no.net/dubjai/win32cpptut/special/pointers/ch_01.pdf
     
    BobR, Mar 21, 2007
    #3
  4. barfle

    barfle Guest

    On 21 Mar, 12:43, "mlimber" <> wrote:

    >
    > With your background, you might do well with the Creator's tome: _The C
    > ++ Programming Language_ 3rd ed, by Stroustrup.
    >
    > For more of a tutorial style, I'd highly recommend _Accelerated C++_
    > by Koenig and Moo, which teaches C++ from the ground up the right way
    > (e.g., it introduces vectors and strings up front and leaves pointers
    > and arrays to the end; cf. FAQ 34.1). It's short, and it's the best of
    > it's kind IMHO.
    >
    > For advanced techniques, you may also want to get something like
    > _Modern C++ Design_ by Alexandrescu, which shows how to use OO design
    > patterns effectively in C++, but it is not for those who are not
    > already somewhat comfortable with using templates.
    >


    Thanks mlimber.

    I used to have access to Stroustrup at work so I never bothered buying
    a copy. It might be worth investing in.

    Alexandrescu popped up when I did a search on amazon for C++ OOP and
    had quite favourable reviews. I've used templates and understand the
    principles but wouldn't necessarily say I am comfortable with them :)
    I'll have another look at this.

    Koenig and Moo I wasn't aware of. It sounds good - I like short books
    as I can take them out with me and read them on the train.
     
    barfle, Mar 22, 2007
    #4
  5. barfle

    barfle Guest

    On 21 Mar, 21:07, "BobR" <> wrote:

    >
    > In *addition* to the other books suggested (mlimber):
    >
    > Get "Thinking in C++", 2nd ed. Volume 1&2 by Bruce Eckel
    > (available for free here. You can buy it in hardcopy too.):http://www.mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html
    >
    > --
    > Bob R
    > POVrookie
    > --



    Thanks Bob

    Just checked out the reviews on and this has very high ratings for
    people who are experienced in C but don't know so much C++ ( which is
    definitely my position ) so this is definitely high up on my list.
     
    barfle, Mar 22, 2007
    #5
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