Calling Values

Discussion in 'Python' started by Subhabrata, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. Subhabrata

    Subhabrata Guest

    Dear Group,

    I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:
    def func1():
    num1=10
    num2=20
    print "The Second Number is:",num2
    return

    def func2():
    num3=num1+num2
    num4=num3+num1
    print "New Number One is:",num3
    print "New Number Two is:",num4
    return

    I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?

    Thanking in Advance,
    Regards,
    Subhabrata.
     
    Subhabrata, Aug 3, 2012
    #1
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  2. On 03/08/2012 12:49, Subhabrata wrote:
    > Dear Group,
    >
    > I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:
    > def func1():
    > num1=10
    > num2=20
    > print "The Second Number is:",num2
    > return
    >
    > def func2():
    > num3=num1+num2
    > num4=num3+num1
    > print "New Number One is:",num3
    > print "New Number Two is:",num4
    > return
    >
    > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?
    >
    > Thanking in Advance,
    > Regards,
    > Subhabrata.
    >


    I think you've got the wrong group, but I don't know the best one for
    psychiatrists :) Seriously I can't see what you're trying to achieve
    with this approach. Can you explain it and I'm certain that we'll come
    up with a decent solution to your problem, whatever that may be.

    --
    Cheers.

    Mark Lawrence.
     
    Mark Lawrence, Aug 3, 2012
    #2
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  3. Am 03.08.2012 13:49, schrieb Subhabrata:
    > I am trying to call the values of one function in the
    > another function in the following way:
    >
    > def func1():
    > num1=10
    > num2=20
    > print "The Second Number is:",num2
    > return
    >
    > def func2():
    > num3=num1+num2
    > num4=num3+num1
    > print "New Number One is:",num3
    > print "New Number Two is:",num4
    > return
    >
    > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class?


    You could make those variables global, see the "global" statement in the
    documentation of the language. However: I don't think that is a good
    idea and it will make your program more confusing to read than
    necessary, but go ahead and make that experience yourself. ;)

    If you want, you can post your code here when done so that others might
    give you hints how to do things easier and cleaner, like e.g. putting
    spaces around operators and using four spaces indention (See PEP 8) or
    dropping the implied return from functions that return nothing. Apart
    from that, the above code is too short and with too little info what
    it's supposed to achieve, I can't really give you better advise.

    Good luck!

    Uli
     
    Ulrich Eckhardt, Aug 3, 2012
    #3
  4. Subhabrata

    Nobody Guest

    On Fri, 03 Aug 2012 04:49:46 -0700, Subhabrata wrote:

    > I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function
    > in the following way:
    > def func1():
    > num1=10
    > num2=20
    > print "The Second Number is:",num2
    > return
    >
    > def func2():
    > num3=num1+num2
    > num4=num3+num1


    A function's local variables only exist while that function is being
    executed[1]. It's meaningless to try to access them from outside the
    function.

    [1] There is an exception (closures), but it doesn't have any bearing on
    this particular problem.
     
    Nobody, Aug 3, 2012
    #4
  5. Subhabrata

    Guest

    On Friday, August 3, 2012 5:19:46 PM UTC+5:30, Subhabrata wrote:
    > Dear Group,
    >
    >
    >
    > I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:
    >
    > def func1():
    >
    > num1=10
    >
    > num2=20
    >
    > print "The Second Number is:",num2
    >
    > return
    >
    >
    >
    > def func2():
    >
    > num3=num1+num2
    >
    > num4=num3+num1
    >
    > print "New Number One is:",num3
    >
    > print "New Number Two is:",num4
    >
    > return
    >
    >
    >
    > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanking in Advance,
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Subhabrata.


    Dear Group,

    def func1():

    num1=10

    num2=20

    print "The Second Number is:",num2

    return


    def func2():

    func1()
    num3=num1+num2

    num4=num3+num1

    print "New Number One is:",num3

    print "New Number Two is:",num4


    This works. Even you can incoportate some conditionals over func1() in func2() and run.
    My question can I call its values of func1() too?
    What it is the big deal in experimenting we may come up with some new code or a new need?
    Indentation slightly differs while you post, I agree. Return I just like too use.
    Mark you are too concerned for me, thanks.

    Regards,
    Subhabrata.
     
    , Aug 3, 2012
    #5

  6. > def func1():
    >
    > num1=10
    >
    > num2=20
    >
    > print "The Second Number is:",num2
    >
    > return
    >
    >
    > def func2():
    >
    > func1()
    >num3=num1+num2
    >
    > num4=num3+num1
    >
    > print "New Number One is:",num3
    >
    > print "New Number Two is:",num4
    >
    >
    > This works. Even you can incoportate some conditionals over func1() in func2()
    > and run.


    This does not work. Python does not get "compiled" in the same manner
    as other languages (C, Java etc). Since you never call func2(), there is no
    error. Once you try calling func2() you will see it does not work. func1()
    does work.

    The Second Number is: 20
    Traceback (mostrecent call last):
    File "subha.py", line 24, in <module>
    func2()
    File "subha.py", line 15, in func2
    num3=num1+num2
    NameError: global name 'num1' is not defined


    > My question can I call its values of func1() too?
    > What it is the big deal inexperimenting we may come up with some new code or
    > a new need?


    It is not a big deal, that is how you learn. You are just writing code that
    neither works nor really shows enough to tell us why or what you are trying
    to do. Not much I can do to guide or help you because I am completely lost
    at your goal. The best I can do at the moment is say. func2 will not work.
    You could return num1 and num2 from func1() and then it would work.

    def func1():
    num1=10
    num2=20
    print "The Second Number is:",num2
    returnnum1, num2


    def func2():
    num1, num2 = func1()
    num3=num1+num2
    num4=num3+num1
    print "New Number One is:",num3
    print "New Number Two is:",num4


    func2()

    Ramit
    This email is confidential and subject to important disclaimers and
    conditions including on offers for the purchase or sale of
    securities, accuracy and completeness of information, viruses,
    confidentiality, legal privilege, and legal entity disclaimers,
    available at http://www.jpmorgan.com/pages/disclosures/email.
     
    Prasad, Ramit, Aug 3, 2012
    #6
  7. Subhabrata

    Ethan Furman Guest

    wrote:
    > On Friday, August 3, 2012 5:19:46 PM UTC+5:30, Subhabrata wrote:
    >> Dear Group,
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:
    >>
    >> def func1():
    >>
    >> num1=10
    >>
    >> num2=20
    >>
    >> print "The Second Number is:",num2
    >>
    >> return
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> def func2():
    >>
    >> num3=num1+num2
    >>
    >> num4=num3+num1
    >>
    >> print "New Number One is:",num3
    >>
    >> print "New Number Two is:",num4
    >>
    >> return
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanking in Advance,
    >>
    >> Regards,
    >>
    >> Subhabrata.

    >
    > Dear Group,
    >
    > def func1():
    >
    > num1=10
    >
    > num2=20
    >
    > print "The Second Number is:",num2
    >
    > return
    >
    >
    > def func2():
    >
    > func1()
    > num3=num1+num2
    >
    > num4=num3+num1
    >
    > print "New Number One is:",num3
    >
    > print "New Number Two is:",num4
    >
    >
    > This works.


    No, it doesn't. If it does work for you then you have code you aren't
    showing us.

    ~Ethan~
     
    Ethan Furman, Aug 3, 2012
    #7
  8. On Fri, 03 Aug 2012 04:49:46 -0700, Subhabrata wrote:

    > I am preferring not to use argument passing


    It's not 1964 any more and you're not programming in BASIC.

    What you have just told us is that you prefer not to write good quality
    programs, and that you prefer to write buggy, hard to maintain code.

    Of course that is your right to make such a foolish choice, but you
    shouldn't expect people to help you. There is enough terrible code in the
    world without encouraging people to write more.

    If you would like to learn good coding techniques, please stay around
    here and pay attention to modern practices for writing good quality code.
    If you would rather stick to worst-practices from the 1960s, don't expect
    any encouragement.



    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Aug 3, 2012
    #8
  9. On Fri, 3 Aug 2012 04:49:46 -0700 (PDT), Subhabrata
    <> declaimed the following in
    gmane.comp.python.general:

    > Dear Group,
    >
    > I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:


    Technically, "the values of one function" are whatever it RETURNS;

    > def func1():
    > num1=10
    > num2=20
    > print "The Second Number is:",num2
    > return
    >

    This function returns None.

    Recommended software design practices are that any thing inside the
    function should be local to just that function -- a function should be a
    black box -- you call it with some data, and you obtain some results
    when it returns; what it does internally should be "invisible" and have
    no effect on any other code.

    Read:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_(computer_programming)
    (what you are attempting falls into "content coupling" if you change the
    use of "module" to "function")

    However, Python lets you declare names to be global (to the
    module/file). This is primarily meant to be used when a function must
    rebind a module level entity. (This would be "common coupling")

    def func1():
    global num1, num2
    ...

    But, as mentioned, that now makes num1 and num2 names that are known
    outside the functions.

    > def func2():
    > num3=num1+num2
    > num4=num3+num1
    > print "New Number One is:",num3
    > print "New Number Two is:",num4
    > return
    >

    Misleading print statements, as you are NOT changing "number one" or
    "number two"; you've just created two NEW names (num3, num4).

    > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?
    >


    Well, if you end func1 with

    return num1, num2

    you can change func2 into:

    def func2():
    n1, n2 = func1()
    num3 = n1 + n2
    num4 = num3 + n1
    ....
    --
    Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber AF6VN
    HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/
     
    Dennis Lee Bieber, Aug 3, 2012
    #9
  10. Subhabrata

    Guest

    On Friday, August 3, 2012 10:50:52 PM UTC+5:30, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:
    > On Fri, 3 Aug 2012 04:49:46 -0700 (PDT), Subhabrata
    >
    > <> declaimed the following in
    >
    > gmane.comp.python.general:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Dear Group,

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:

    >
    >
    >
    > Technically, "the values of one function" are whatever it RETURNS;
    >
    >
    >
    > > def func1():

    >
    > > num1=10

    >
    > > num2=20

    >
    > > print "The Second Number is:",num2

    >
    > > return

    >
    > >

    >
    > This function returns None.
    >
    >
    >
    > Recommended software design practices are that any thing inside the
    >
    > function should be local to just that function -- a function should be a
    >
    > black box -- you call it with some data, and you obtain some results
    >
    > when it returns; what it does internally should be "invisible" and have
    >
    > no effect on any other code.
    >
    >
    >
    > Read:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_(computer_programming)
    >
    > (what you are attempting falls into "content coupling" if you change the
    >
    > use of "module" to "function")
    >
    >
    >
    > However, Python lets you declare names to be global (to the
    >
    > module/file). This is primarily meant to be used when a function must
    >
    > rebind a module level entity. (This would be "common coupling")
    >
    >
    >
    > def func1():
    >
    > global num1, num2
    >
    > ...
    >
    >
    >
    > But, as mentioned, that now makes num1 and num2 names that are known
    >
    > outside the functions.
    >
    >
    >
    > > def func2():

    >
    > > num3=num1+num2

    >
    > > num4=num3+num1

    >
    > > print "New Number One is:",num3

    >
    > > print "New Number Two is:",num4

    >
    > > return

    >
    > >

    >
    > Misleading print statements, as you are NOT changing "number one" or
    >
    > "number two"; you've just created two NEW names (num3, num4).
    >
    >
    >
    > > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > Well, if you end func1 with
    >
    >
    >
    > return num1, num2
    >
    >
    >
    > you can change func2 into:
    >
    >
    >
    > def func2():
    >
    > n1, n2 = func1()
    >
    > num3 = n1 + n2
    >
    > num4 = num3 + n1
    >
    > ...
    >
    > --
    >
    > Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber AF6VN
    >
    > HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/


    Dear Group,
    Absolutely brilliant, Ramit. Dennis also came with almost same answer. Using global may not give clean results everytime.

    I wanted to say,
    >>> def func1():

    num1=10
    num2=20
    print "The Second Number is:",num2


    >>> def func2():

    func1()
    num3=50
    print "The New Number is:",num3

    >>> func2()

    The Second Number is: 20
    The New Number is: 50
    The post went slightly wrong sorry.
    No, I experiment myself on idle evenings to experiment with coding etc so Ithink of problems, practice on them and try to see if any better code evolves. Nothing else. I posted and Steve did not comment perhaps never happens.. He rebukes me so much from my early days here, I just enjoy it.

    Regards and best wishes,
    Subhabrata.
     
    , Aug 3, 2012
    #10
  11. Subhabrata

    Guest

    On Friday, August 3, 2012 10:50:52 PM UTC+5:30, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:
    > On Fri, 3 Aug 2012 04:49:46 -0700 (PDT), Subhabrata
    >
    > <> declaimed the following in
    >
    > gmane.comp.python.general:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Dear Group,

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:

    >
    >
    >
    > Technically, "the values of one function" are whatever it RETURNS;
    >
    >
    >
    > > def func1():

    >
    > > num1=10

    >
    > > num2=20

    >
    > > print "The Second Number is:",num2

    >
    > > return

    >
    > >

    >
    > This function returns None.
    >
    >
    >
    > Recommended software design practices are that any thing inside the
    >
    > function should be local to just that function -- a function should be a
    >
    > black box -- you call it with some data, and you obtain some results
    >
    > when it returns; what it does internally should be "invisible" and have
    >
    > no effect on any other code.
    >
    >
    >
    > Read:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_(computer_programming)
    >
    > (what you are attempting falls into "content coupling" if you change the
    >
    > use of "module" to "function")
    >
    >
    >
    > However, Python lets you declare names to be global (to the
    >
    > module/file). This is primarily meant to be used when a function must
    >
    > rebind a module level entity. (This would be "common coupling")
    >
    >
    >
    > def func1():
    >
    > global num1, num2
    >
    > ...
    >
    >
    >
    > But, as mentioned, that now makes num1 and num2 names that are known
    >
    > outside the functions.
    >
    >
    >
    > > def func2():

    >
    > > num3=num1+num2

    >
    > > num4=num3+num1

    >
    > > print "New Number One is:",num3

    >
    > > print "New Number Two is:",num4

    >
    > > return

    >
    > >

    >
    > Misleading print statements, as you are NOT changing "number one" or
    >
    > "number two"; you've just created two NEW names (num3, num4).
    >
    >
    >
    > > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > Well, if you end func1 with
    >
    >
    >
    > return num1, num2
    >
    >
    >
    > you can change func2 into:
    >
    >
    >
    > def func2():
    >
    > n1, n2 = func1()
    >
    > num3 = n1 + n2
    >
    > num4 = num3 + n1
    >
    > ...
    >
    > --
    >
    > Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber AF6VN
    >
    > HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/


    Dear Group,
    Absolutely brilliant, Ramit. Dennis also came with almost same answer. Using global may not give clean results everytime.

    I wanted to say,
    >>> def func1():

    num1=10
    num2=20
    print "The Second Number is:",num2


    >>> def func2():

    func1()
    num3=50
    print "The New Number is:",num3

    >>> func2()

    The Second Number is: 20
    The New Number is: 50
    The post went slightly wrong sorry.
    No, I experiment myself on idle evenings to experiment with coding etc so Ithink of problems, practice on them and try to see if any better code evolves. Nothing else. I posted and Steve did not comment perhaps never happens.. He rebukes me so much from my early days here, I just enjoy it.

    Regards and best wishes,
    Subhabrata.
     
    , Aug 3, 2012
    #11
  12. Subhabrata

    alex23 Guest

    On Aug 3, 9:49 pm, Subhabrata <> wrote:
    > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?


    If you don't want to program in Python, don't use Python.
     
    alex23, Aug 6, 2012
    #12
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