Can not download plugins for jEdit (help!!)

Discussion in 'Python' started by BillJosephson, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. Hi all. I am trying to use jEdit, but can't seem to download
    any plugins. I go to Plugin Manager, and select Download
    options. I update the mirro and can see lots of servers.
    I select the first (plugin central default) and say apply.
    In the Update dialogues bottom window, I see a msg saying
    "Dowloading plugin list from jedit.plugins.org but after
    a couple seconds it disappears. Inveitably when I select
    Console and the click install, it give me "An I/0 error
    occurred (Connection refused: connect)

    If anyone knows why i can't connect, in info about it would be
    a big help.

    Thanks in advance.....
     
    BillJosephson, Nov 9, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. BillJosephson

    Lich_Ray Guest

    Lich_Ray, Nov 9, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. BillJosephson

    Ant Guest

    On Nov 9, 6:52 am, "BillJosephson" <> wrote:
    ....
    > If anyone knows why i can't connect, in info about it would be
    > a big help.


    Sounds like the default mirror is down. Go to Utilities -> Global
    Options -> Plugin Manager and click on "Update mirror list". Choose a
    new mirror and try again. If that still fails, it may be that you need
    to set up your proxy server properly.
     
    Ant, Nov 9, 2006
    #3
  4. BillJosephson

    Ant Guest

    > Vim, it can handle all the things.http://www.vim.org/

    I'm not convinced of that quite yet. jEdit's syntax highlighting seems
    more robust (see SocketServer.py in the standard library for an example
    - vim gets the highlighting of the first doc-comment wrong). I've also
    not found anything like jEdit's Console plugin for vim. It's
    interactive. You can run the current buffer in the console window. The
    console interacts with an error reporting pane which allows you to
    click on the error and it will take you to the appropriate line in the
    code that the stack trace indicates.

    The only thing I have found for vim (and it is specific to running
    Python code) is the runscript.vim plugin, which merely allows you to
    view the stdout from the script in a different buffer. It doesn't allow
    you to interact (say you are writing a console based interactive
    application for example) nor does it have all of those other features
    I mentioned.

    I'm very interested in other people's vim setup for Python coding
    however, as I do use vim more than Python these days, mainly because I
    have to use it a great deal on headless servers (jEdit would be no good
    here of course) and I got fed up with adding artefacts such as
    extraneous i's, o's and :w's into my code when working with jEdit ;-)
    And it starts faster of course.
     
    Ant, Nov 9, 2006
    #4
  5. BillJosephson

    Neil Cerutti Guest

    On 2006-11-09, Ant <> wrote:
    >> Vim, it can handle all the things.http://www.vim.org/

    >
    > I'm not convinced of that quite yet. jEdit's syntax
    > highlighting seems more robust (see SocketServer.py in the
    > standard library for an example - vim gets the highlighting of
    > the first doc-comment wrong).


    Code inside strings, e.g., doctests, breaks the synchronization
    code. I fixed this for myself by adopting the convention in my
    code that all closing """ are at the end of a line, while opening
    """ never are. Then I changed the synchronize declarations in
    /syntax/python.vim to the following:

    syn sync match pythonSync grouphere NONE '"""$'
    syn sync maxlines=300

    The above is no good for random Python code, though.

    But in random Python code you can simply increase the number of
    lines inspected as high as your machine can handle, as documented
    in python.vim.

    > I've also not found anything like jEdit's Console plugin for
    > vim. It's interactive. You can run the current buffer in the
    > console window. The console interacts with an error reporting
    > pane which allows you to click on the error and it will take
    > you to the appropriate line in the code that the stack trace
    > indicates.


    I haven't got that working in Vim, because I haven't been
    irritated enough by its lack to try. Python's extremely verbose
    error reports make designing errorformat a little tricky, but it
    can be done, and the day may come soon.

    The reason I haven't adapted quickfix mode to Python is that Vim
    would hide most of the Traceback. I'd constantly be executing the
    command to show the entire error message, so I've chosen to
    eschew quickfix mode for Python code.

    If there's some quickfix mode settings that solve these problems
    I'd be happy to purloin it.

    > I'm very interested in other people's vim setup for Python coding
    > however, as I do use vim more than Python these days, mainly because I
    > have to use it a great deal on headless servers (jEdit would be no good
    > here of course) and I got fed up with adding artefacts such as
    > extraneous i's, o's and :w's into my code when working with jEdit ;-)
    > And it starts faster of course.


    The default Python plugin provides the [[, ]] and [m, ]m commands
    for jumping to the next function or method respectively. They are
    a nice help once you're aware of them. There's a more powerful
    plugin available on the internet, but it the code-jumps were the
    main commands I wanted.

    pytags should be in your Tools directory. I haven't found it
    terribly useful, but in theory it's invaluable (my project is
    piddly in size at the moment).

    If you set shiftwidth to your preferred Python indent, then
    indenting and unindenting code blocks is as easy as the < and >
    commands.

    --
    Neil Cerutti
     
    Neil Cerutti, Nov 9, 2006
    #5
  6. BillJosephson

    Ant Guest

    On Nov 9, 2:11 pm, Neil Cerutti <> wrote:
    ....
    > """ never are. Then I changed the synchronize declarations in
    > /syntax/python.vim to the following:
    >
    > syn sync match pythonSync grouphere NONE '"""$'
    > syn sync maxlines=300
    >
    > The above is no good for random Python code, though.
    >
    > But in random Python code you can simply increase the number of
    > lines inspected as high as your machine can handle, as documented
    > in python.vim.


    I commented out the maxlines line, and uncommented the syn sync
    minlines=2000 line, and that seems to have worked.

    > The reason I haven't adapted quickfix mode to Python is that Vim
    > would hide most of the Traceback. I'd constantly be executing the
    > command to show the entire error message, so I've chosen to
    > eschew quickfix mode for Python code.


    Sounds interesting - I may take a look at it.

    > ... default Python plugin provides the [[, ]] and [m, ]m commands
    > for jumping to the next function or method respectively. They are
    > a nice help once you're aware of them. There's a more powerful
    > plugin available on the internet, but it the code-jumps were the
    > main commands I wanted.


    They sound good. I've been using the taglist.vim plugin for code
    browsing which is pretty good for that sort of thing.

    > pytags should be in your Tools directory. I haven't found it
    > terribly useful, but in theory it's invaluable (my project is
    > piddly in size at the moment).


    I'll take a look. A code navigation tool I presume?

    > If you set shiftwidth to your preferred Python indent, then
    > indenting and unindenting code blocks is as easy as the < and >
    > commands


    Yes - I have that set up. Thanks for the tips :)
     
    Ant, Nov 9, 2006
    #6
  7. Ant wrote:
    > > Vim, it can handle all the things.http://www.vim.org/

    >
    > I'm not convinced of that quite yet. jEdit's syntax highlighting seems
    > more robust (see SocketServer.py in the standard library for an example
    > - vim gets the highlighting of the first doc-comment wrong). I've also
    > not found anything like jEdit's Console plugin for vim. It's
    > interactive. You can run the current buffer in the console window. The
    > console interacts with an error reporting pane which allows you to
    > click on the error and it will take you to the appropriate line in the
    > code that the stack trace indicates.
    >
    > The only thing I have found for vim (and it is specific to running
    > Python code) is the runscript.vim plugin, which merely allows you to
    > view the stdout from the script in a different buffer. It doesn't allow
    > you to interact (say you are writing a console based interactive
    > application for example) nor does it have all of those other features
    > I mentioned.
    >
    > I'm very interested in other people's vim setup for Python coding
    > however, as I do use vim more than Python these days, mainly because I
    > have to use it a great deal on headless servers (jEdit would be no good
    > here of course) and I got fed up with adding artefacts such as
    > extraneous i's, o's and :w's into my code when working with jEdit ;-)
    > And it starts faster of course.



    Ant:


    Great. Can you help me get it?

    Thanks.
     
    BillJosephson, Nov 9, 2006
    #7
  8. BillJosephson

    John Salerno Guest

    Ant wrote:

    > I do use vim more than Python these days


    What does that mean? Are you referring to all the setup involved with vim?
     
    John Salerno, Nov 9, 2006
    #8
  9. Ant wrote:
    > On Nov 9, 6:52 am, "BillJosephson" <> wrote:
    > ...
    > > If anyone knows why i can't connect, in info about it would be
    > > a big help.

    >
    > Sounds like the default mirror is down. Go to Utilities -> Global
    > Options -> Plugin Manager and click on "Update mirror list". Choose a
    > new mirror and try again. If that still fails, it may be that you need
    > to set up your proxy server properly.




    Woo hoo! It worked! Now of course it was a dumb question to begin
    with.

    May I ask another quetion? I don't want to mess with lots of plugins
    at this point. What are the minimum plugins to get a typical looking
    IDE with a code window and output window and that lets me set
    breakpoints and step through code?

    Thanks a lot Ant, I appreciate your help.
     
    BillJosephson, Nov 9, 2006
    #9
  10. Ant <> skriver:
    >> Vim, it can handle all the things.http://www.vim.org/

    >
    > I'm not convinced of that quite yet. jEdit's syntax highlighting seems
    > more robust (see SocketServer.py in the standard library for an example
    > - vim gets the highlighting of the first doc-comment wrong). I've also


    I can't see that problem at all. Vim 7.0 standard win32 build and
    6.4 on OpenBSD.

    My vimrc hold and old rule that I'm not sure is needed or how it works
    against the new standard python module:

    :au BufEnter *.py :set smarttab smartindent \
    cinwords="if,elif,else,for,while,def,try,rxcept,finally,class"

    I have not yet seen any problenm from it but maybe it's time to remote
    it soon.


    / Balp
    --
    http://anders.arnholm.nu/ Keep on Balping
     
    Anders Arnholm, Nov 9, 2006
    #10
  11. BillJosephson

    Ant Guest

    > May I ask another quetion? I don't want to mess with lots of plugins
    > at this point. What are the minimum plugins to get a typical looking
    > IDE with a code window and output window and that lets me set
    > breakpoints and step through code?


    The Console plugin is a must (I think it depends on the ErrorList
    plugin which is also very useful as I noted above). JPyDebug is an
    interactive debugger - I have never used it mind, I usually rely on
    print statements to debug stuff.
     
    Ant, Nov 9, 2006
    #11
  12. BillJosephson

    Ant Guest

    On Nov 9, 3:27 pm, John Salerno <> wrote:
    > Ant wrote:
    > > I do use vim more than Python these daysWhat does that mean? Are you referring to all the setup involved with vim?


    Whoops! I mean I use vim more than jEdit these days!
     
    Ant, Nov 9, 2006
    #12
  13. BillJosephson

    Neil Cerutti Guest

    On 2006-11-09, Anders Arnholm <> wrote:
    > Ant <> skriver:
    >>> Vim, it can handle all the things.http://www.vim.org/

    >>
    >> I'm not convinced of that quite yet. jEdit's syntax highlighting seems
    >> more robust (see SocketServer.py in the standard library for an example
    >> - vim gets the highlighting of the first doc-comment wrong). I've also

    >
    > I can't see that problem at all. Vim 7.0 standard win32 build and
    > 6.4 on OpenBSD.
    >
    > My vimrc hold and old rule that I'm not sure is needed or how it works
    > against the new standard python module:
    >
    >:au BufEnter *.py :set smarttab smartindent \
    > cinwords="if,elif,else,for,while,def,try,rxcept,finally,class"


    You shouldn't need that as long as the default plugin for Python
    loads correctly. (except is spelled wrong by the way.)

    --
    Neil Cerutti
    Women's Luncheon: Each member bring a sandwich. Polly Phillips will
    give the medication. --Church Bulletin Blooper
     
    Neil Cerutti, Nov 9, 2006
    #13
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Henrique Seganfredo

    which plugins download for Eclipse?

    Henrique Seganfredo, May 20, 2004, in forum: Java
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    439
    Bryce
    May 20, 2004
  2. BillJosephson
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    649
    JanTheKing
    Nov 9, 2006
  3. BillJosephson

    Advice on basic jedit plugins

    BillJosephson, Nov 28, 2006, in forum: Java
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    272
    BillJosephson
    Nov 28, 2006
  4. BillJosephson
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    138
    Stephen Duncan
    Nov 9, 2006
  5. SpringFlowers AutumnMoon

    jEdit can run code like TextMate does?

    SpringFlowers AutumnMoon, Sep 18, 2007, in forum: Ruby
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    218
    SpringFlowers AutumnMoon
    Sep 22, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page