can you recommend some easy ruby project for newbie?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by nonocast, Nov 6, 2005.

  1. nonocast

    nonocast Guest

    i am a ruby newbie
    i learn something from ruby-lang.org & rubyonrails.com
    but it's only syntax.
    i want to learn more about project written by ruby.
    thanks.
     
    nonocast, Nov 6, 2005
    #1
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  2. nonocast

    Guest

    nonocast wrote:
    > i am a ruby newbie
    > i learn something from ruby-lang.org & rubyonrails.com
    > but it's only syntax.
    > i want to learn more about project written by ruby.
    > thanks.


    These are suggestions I found in a Python forum:

    http://www.daniweb.com/techtalkforums/thread32007-1.html

    Have fun!

    Nathan.
     
    , Nov 6, 2005
    #2
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  3. nonocast

    nonocast Guest

    thanks Nathan.
    but it's all about python :(
    i want to read some ruby code
    it doesn't very large.just a small program.
    something like rails is too complex to me.
    i am a newbie.i want to know how to start.



    <> ????
    news:...
    >
    > nonocast wrote:
    > > i am a ruby newbie
    > > i learn something from ruby-lang.org & rubyonrails.com
    > > but it's only syntax.
    > > i want to learn more about project written by ruby.
    > > thanks.

    >
    > These are suggestions I found in a Python forum:
    >
    > http://www.daniweb.com/techtalkforums/thread32007-1.html
    >
    > Have fun!
    >
    > Nathan.
    >
    >
     
    nonocast, Nov 6, 2005
    #3
  4. nonocast

    Trans Guest

    Trans, Nov 6, 2005
    #4
  5. ------=_Part_30146_468187.1131257519061
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
    Content-Disposition: inline

    I took a glance at Nathan's list, and most seem general enough to apply to
    Ruby.

    Personally, I like to pick small, personal projects to learn a new language=
     
    William Ramirez, Nov 6, 2005
    #5
  6. nonocast

    Bill Kelly Guest

    Hi,

    From: "nonocast" <>
    >
    > i want to read some ruby code
    > it doesn't very large.just a small program.
    > something like rails is too complex to me.
    > i am a newbie.i want to know how to start.


    If rails is too complex, you could flip to the other
    end of the spectrum, and experiment with a "hello world"
    program using the CGI library. This might be helpful,
    on the supposition that learning some CGI basics should
    give some insight into what frameworks like Rails and
    others are attempting to help make simpler.

    The WEBrick HTTP server has been bundled with the
    standard library since Ruby-1-8-0. This would allow you
    to serve your own web pages on your local machine, to
    develop your program and learn about CGI and web
    programming. Because CGI is a standard protocol, CGI
    programs that you develop using WEBrick will translate
    to servers like Apache, so if you have an Internet
    web host that supports Ruby (there are many to choose
    from) your CGI programs developed on your local
    computer using WEBrick, will run on the Internet, too.

    If you want to store your data in a database, you have
    options from the simple (Marshal/YAML -- built-in to
    Ruby) to ActiveRecord or Og or other object-relational-
    mapper services, as well as direct SQL database
    connections via DBI, . . .

    So you can start simple, but might find basic CGI
    learning useful, if you're interested in web programming
    and rails.

    Just a thought

    Regards,

    Bill
     
    Bill Kelly, Nov 6, 2005
    #6
  7. nonocast

    James Britt Guest

    William Ramirez wrote:
    > I took a glance at Nathan's list, and most seem general enough to apply to
    > Ruby.
    >
    > Personally, I like to pick small, personal projects to learn a new language.
    > I pick a repetitive task I do often and try to automate them. Your mileage
    > may vary.


    This is a good suggestion. The Ruby Quizzes may be a source of
    interesting challenges, and the solutions are often good examples of
    clever Ruby hacking, but motivation when learning is key, and starting
    simple and expanding can be a good path.

    Scratching your own itch, if even somewhat trivial, makes it personal.
    You can start small, automate a simple task, and then add features and
    try out better implementations over time.


    James


    --

    http://www.ruby-doc.org - The Ruby Documentation Site
    http://www.rubyxml.com - News, Articles, and Listings for Ruby & XML
    http://www.rubystuff.com - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff
    http://www.jamesbritt.com - Playing with Better Toys
     
    James Britt, Nov 6, 2005
    #7
  8. nonocast

    nonocast Guest

    thanks for everybody
    btw, is there any project for newbie to read?


    "Bill Kelly" <> ????
    news:002c01c5e29a$1979f0b0$6442a8c0@musicbox...
    > Hi,
    >
    > From: "nonocast" <>
    > >
    > > i want to read some ruby code
    > > it doesn't very large.just a small program.
    > > something like rails is too complex to me.
    > > i am a newbie.i want to know how to start.

    >
    > If rails is too complex, you could flip to the other
    > end of the spectrum, and experiment with a "hello world"
    > program using the CGI library. This might be helpful,
    > on the supposition that learning some CGI basics should
    > give some insight into what frameworks like Rails and
    > others are attempting to help make simpler.
    >
    > The WEBrick HTTP server has been bundled with the
    > standard library since Ruby-1-8-0. This would allow you
    > to serve your own web pages on your local machine, to
    > develop your program and learn about CGI and web
    > programming. Because CGI is a standard protocol, CGI
    > programs that you develop using WEBrick will translate
    > to servers like Apache, so if you have an Internet
    > web host that supports Ruby (there are many to choose
    > from) your CGI programs developed on your local
    > computer using WEBrick, will run on the Internet, too.
    >
    > If you want to store your data in a database, you have
    > options from the simple (Marshal/YAML -- built-in to
    > Ruby) to ActiveRecord or Og or other object-relational-
    > mapper services, as well as direct SQL database
    > connections via DBI, . . .
    >
    > So you can start simple, but might find basic CGI
    > learning useful, if you're interested in web programming
    > and rails.
    >
    > Just a thought
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Bill
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    nonocast, Nov 6, 2005
    #8
  9. nonocast

    Jim Guest

    There are several tutorials on the web. I like to fire up irb, and go
    through them just for fun.
     
    Jim, Nov 6, 2005
    #9
  10. nonocast

    Kevin Brown Guest

    On Sunday 06 November 2005 01:07, nonocast wrote:
    > thanks for everybody
    > btw, is there any project for newbie to read?


    I would say start with the online version of the pickaxe.

    http://www.rubycentral.com/book/

    This builds a (cheesy, but it works) example of a jukebox from scratch. It's
    Ruby 1.6, but you'll find the basics are the same. Most of us on this list
    own the second version of the book, it's GREAT.
     
    Kevin Brown, Nov 6, 2005
    #10
  11. nonocast

    nonocast Guest

    I have already read this book.:)
    this's a good book and a good start.but not a real project.


    "Kevin Brown" <> дÈëÏûÏ¢
    news:...
    > On Sunday 06 November 2005 01:07, nonocast wrote:
    > > thanks for everybody
    > > btw, is there any project for newbie to read?

    >
    > I would say start with the online version of the pickaxe.
    >
    > http://www.rubycentral.com/book/
    >
    > This builds a (cheesy, but it works) example of a jukebox from scratch.

    It's
    > Ruby 1.6, but you'll find the basics are the same. Most of us on this

    list
    > own the second version of the book, it's GREAT.
    >
    >
    >
     
    nonocast, Nov 6, 2005
    #11
  12. On 11/6/05, nonocast <> wrote:
    > I have already read this book.:)
    > this's a good book and a good start.but not a real project.


    You might try sifting through RubyForge. You can browse the source
    online for almost any of the projects there. You can take a look at
    the projects i'm on (HighLine, Gambit, Ruport) but none of them are
    especially good "Newbie" projects. However, Gambit's models might be
    fairly easy to understand (lib/gambit/tools)

    http://rubyforge.org/cgi-bin/viewcvs.cgi/gambit/lib/gambit/tools/?cvsroot=
    =3Dgambit

    and you can learn a bit more by reading the unit tests and example
    code in there as well.

    As far as the controller goes, that's a whole other story :)

    What kind of project are you looking for? That might help us point
    you in the right direction.

    Still, as others have mentioned, the best approach is scratching a
    personal itch. You'll learn a lot more that way. :)
     
    Gregory Brown, Nov 6, 2005
    #12
  13. nonocast

    Gary Watson Guest

    All of my projects qualify, that is if you follow the logic that they
    are all written by a newb and are better qualified for newbie reading.

    nonocast wrote:
    > thanks for everybody
    > btw, is there any project for newbie to read?
    >
    >
    > "Bill Kelly" <> ????
    > news:002c01c5e29a$1979f0b0$6442a8c0@musicbox...
    >
     
    Gary Watson, Nov 6, 2005
    #13
  14. nonocast

    Pete Guest

    probably not _that_ easy but still interesting:

    http://dev.hieraki.org/trac.cgi/browser/trunk/


    On Sun, 06 Nov 2005 17:17:11 +0100, Gary Watson <> =20
    wrote:

    > All of my projects qualify, that is if you follow the logic that they =20
    > are all written by a newb and are better qualified for newbie reading.
    >
    > nonocast wrote:
    >> thanks for everybody
    >> btw, is there any project for newbie to read?
    >> "Bill Kelly" <> ????
    >> news:002c01c5e29a$1979f0b0$6442a8c0@musicbox...
    >>

    >
     
    Pete, Nov 6, 2005
    #14
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