changing text size in browsers

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006.

  1. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    I created some HTML files for my webpage using Microsoft Word. If I
    go to my webpage in Mozilla Firefox, changing the text size works. If
    I go to it in Internet Explorer, the "text size" doesn't change the
    size. Is there something I need to do so that IE users can change the
    text size?
    ---
    Replace you know what by j to email
     
    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jud McCranie

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Jud McCranie <> wrote:

    > I created some HTML files for my webpage using Microsoft Word. If I
    > go to my webpage in Mozilla Firefox, changing the text size works. If
    > I go to it in Internet Explorer, the "text size" doesn't change the
    > size. Is there something I need to do so that IE users can change the
    > text size?
    > ---
    > Replace you know what by j to email


    Go through the source code and change all font-size specs from px
    to %. If it is very obviously small as displayed in IE, and you
    want the relationship between this and the bigger normal text of
    the body of the webpage to be preserved, try to see what the
    equivalent is by experimenting with %.

    (You won't one day when you have more time be wanting to be using
    this software to create what is almost invariably awful mark up
    and css... but this is btw. I give quick and dirty advice and
    that is why I am shunned and laughed at by all...)

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jun 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jud McCranie

    Sid Ismail Guest

    On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 20:38:06 -0400, Jud McCranie
    <> wrote:

    : I created some HTML files for my webpage using Microsoft Word. If I
    : go to my webpage in Mozilla Firefox, changing the text size works. If
    : I go to it in Internet Explorer, the "text size" doesn't change the
    : size. Is there something I need to do so that IE users can change the
    : text size?


    Microsoft Word is what you use to tell your mother-in-law that you'll
    be away if she wants to visit. It is NOT a webpage editor. Never
    was, never will be.

    Get a decent one - Textpad, EditPad (even Lite), etc etc

    Worse than Word is Frontpage and xls to html, btw.

    Sid
     
    Sid Ismail, Jun 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Jud McCranie

    Ed Mullen Guest

    Jud McCranie wrote:
    > I created some HTML files for my webpage using Microsoft Word. If I
    > go to my webpage in Mozilla Firefox, changing the text size works. If
    > I go to it in Internet Explorer, the "text size" doesn't change the
    > size. Is there something I need to do so that IE users can change the
    > text size?
    > ---
    > Replace you know what by j to email


    FYI ...

    http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-1035_11-5197013.html#

    --
    Ed Mullen
    http://edmullen.net
    http://mozilla.edmullen.net
    http://abington.edmullen.net
    If it's a hobby to us and a job to you, why are you doing such a shoddy
    job? - Linus Torvalds to Microsoft
     
    Ed Mullen, Jun 4, 2006
    #4
  5. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 04:21:19 +0200, Sid Ismail <>
    wrote:

    >Get a decent one - Textpad, EditPad (even Lite), etc etc


    I use editpad pro 6.0 for text. But I know very little HTML.
    ---
    Replace you know what by j to email
     
    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 12:14:57 +1000, dorayme
    <> wrote:

    >Go through the source code and change all font-size specs from px
    >to %. If it is very obviously small as displayed in IE, and you
    >want the relationship between this and the bigger normal text of
    >the body of the webpage to be preserved, try to see what the
    >equivalent is by experimenting with %.


    Thanks, that worked. Just guessing, I replaced:
    10pt -> 40%
    12pt -> 50%
    16pt -> 80%
    18pt -> 90%

    The 40% is way too small. I can experiment around with it a little,
    but are there any guidelines for the percentages? Is > 100% allowed?
    ---
    Replace you know what by j to email
     
    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #6
  7. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #7
  8. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #8
  9. On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 22:51:21 -0400, Jud McCranie
    <> wrote:

    > Thanks, that worked. Just guessing, I replaced:
    > 10pt -> 40%
    > 12pt -> 50%
    > 16pt -> 80%
    > 18pt -> 90%
    >
    > The 40% is way too small. I can experiment around with it a little,
    > but are there any guidelines for the percentages? Is > 100% allowed?


    Sure, I use 100% for normal text and 200% for <H1> and in between for
    smaller headings. So everything is 100% or more. If I wanted tiny text
    I would try 70% or thereabouts.

    --
    Steven
     
    Steven Saunderson, Jun 4, 2006
    #9
  10. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #10
  11. Jud McCranie

    ironcorona Guest

    Jud McCranie wrote:

    > Thanks, that worked. Just guessing, I replaced:
    > 10pt -> 40%
    > 12pt -> 50%
    > 16pt -> 80%
    > 18pt -> 90%
    >
    > The 40% is way too small. I can experiment around with it a little,
    > but are there any guidelines for the percentages?


    If you're using percentages this way just set all font to 100%.
    Something like

    body {font-size:100%;}

    This way the user gets to choose the size of the font.

    What you see as 40% others might not see. I think the default of Serif
    fonts in many browsers is 16pt but this can be changed and is subject to
    personal preference. Don't equate pt sizes to % because you can't know
    what it's going to be a percent of, in terms of the user.

    > Is > 100% allowed?


    yes


    --
    Brian O'Connor (ironcorona)
     
    ironcorona, Jun 4, 2006
    #11
  12. Jud McCranie

    Sid Ismail Guest

    On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 22:35:17 -0400, Jud McCranie
    <> wrote:

    : On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 04:21:19 +0200, Sid Ismail <>
    : wrote:
    :
    : >Get a decent one - Textpad, EditPad (even Lite), etc etc
    :
    : I use editpad pro 6.0 for text. But I know very little HTML.


    Funny enough, I use EditPad Pro also. Together with Coffee Cup 5.0
    and Dreamweaver, Top Style 3, I am pretty contented.

    Here you are:
    http://www.tizag.com/beginnerT/
    http://www.bravenet.com/resourcecenter/tutorials/html/index.php
    http://www.w3schools.com/

    Regards

    Sid
     
    Sid Ismail, Jun 4, 2006
    #12
  13. Jud McCranie

    Sid Ismail Guest

    On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 22:51:21 -0400, Jud McCranie
    <> wrote:

    : Thanks, that worked. Just guessing, I replaced:
    : 10pt -> 40%
    : 12pt -> 50%
    : 16pt -> 80%
    : 18pt -> 90%
    :
    : The 40% is way too small. I can experiment around with it a little,
    : but are there any guidelines for the percentages? Is > 100% allowed?


    Have a look at: http://www.elsid.co.za/download/css_fontsizes.htm

    Sid
     
    Sid Ismail, Jun 4, 2006
    #13
  14. Jud McCranie

    Sid Ismail Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 14:52:56 +0800, ironcorona <>
    wrote:

    : What you see as 40% others might not see. I think the default of Serif
    : fonts in many browsers is 16pt


    depending on resolution... On a 640x480, it is different to 1024x...

    Sid
     
    Sid Ismail, Jun 4, 2006
    #14
  15. On Sat, 3 Jun 2006, Jud McCranie wrote:

    > Thanks, that worked. Just guessing, I replaced:
    > 10pt -> 40%
    > 12pt -> 50%
    > 16pt -> 80%
    > 18pt -> 90%
    >
    > The 40% is way too small.


    Certainly is. Some would rate 65% as marginal, and only to be used
    for stuff that /has/ to be there but few will want to read ("the small
    print").

    But stop thinking of specific physical sizes as your base, and
    percentages as some kind of poor substitute which you're trying to
    equivalence by experiment.

    On the web, percentages (or em units, which are effectively
    equivalent) *are* your base, and physical sizes are only what comes
    out at the end, after /your/ size proposals have been through the
    /reader's/ configuration settings (of default font and size, of text
    zoom, of enforced minimum font setting, and so on). Any other attempt
    is madness. The absolute size units such as pt have their reason for
    existing, e.g for printing; but for web display in arbitrary viewing
    situations unknown to the author, they are desperately
    counter-productive - and would continue to be so even if they were
    implemented to specification, which they generally are not.

    > I can experiment around with it a little,


    Yes, but you're only one reader (as is each of us, of course). You
    can't predict what other readers want or need. So personal
    experiments are inevitably flawed. But two-fifths of the reader's
    chosen (linear) size for normal text (100% or 1.0em) is certainly too
    small.

    > but are there any guidelines for the percentages? Is > 100%
    > allowed?


    Is there online documentation for CSS? Is there a sample stylesheet
    written by W3C specialists, to peruse as some kind of starting
    point?

    Maybe it's just me, but I can't imagine working with something new on
    the basis of mere experiments - I'd always want to know where to find
    the reference documentation, and some respectable samples or tutorials
    to get started.

    Oh, the answers to the two questions are "yes" and "yes". The nearest
    we've got to a currently appropriate reference for CSS is the 2.1
    "working draft": http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/ , and it has an appendix
    with a suggested default stylesheet for HTML, which you might consider
    at least as a sample of CSS in practice, even if you don't want to
    follow that style: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/sample.html
     
    Alan J. Flavell, Jun 4, 2006
    #15
  16. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On Sun, 4 Jun 2006 15:41:03 +0100, "Alan J. Flavell"
    <> wrote:

    >> Thanks, that worked. Just guessing, I replaced:
    >> 10pt -> 40%
    >> 12pt -> 50%
    >> 16pt -> 80%
    >> 18pt -> 90%
    >>

    >But stop thinking of specific physical sizes as your base, and
    >percentages as some kind of poor substitute which you're trying to
    >equivalence by experiment.


    You're right, I had used those font sizes in my original document, and
    those are the substitutions I made.
    ---
    Replace you know what by j to email
     
    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #16
  17. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 15:44:39 +0200, Sid Ismail <>
    wrote:

    >: >Get a decent one - Textpad, EditPad (even Lite), etc etc
    >:
    >: I use editpad pro 6.0 for text. But I know very little HTML.
    >
    >
    >Funny enough, I use EditPad Pro also. Together with Coffee Cup 5.0
    >and Dreamweaver, Top Style 3, I am pretty contented.


    Maybe I need to look at those too. I downloaded TextPad last night,
    and it seems VERY similar to EditPad. (I was a beta tester for
    EditPad 6, BTW).
    ---
    Replace you know what by j to email
     
    Jud McCranie, Jun 4, 2006
    #17
  18. Jud McCranie

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Jud McCranie <> wrote:

    > On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 12:14:57 +1000, dorayme
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Go through the source code and change all font-size specs from px
    > >to %. If it is very obviously small as displayed in IE, and you
    > >want the relationship between this and the bigger normal text of
    > >the body of the webpage to be preserved, try to see what the
    > >equivalent is by experimenting with %.

    >
    > Thanks, that worked. Just guessing, I replaced:
    > 10pt -> 40%
    > 12pt -> 50%
    > 16pt -> 80%
    > 18pt -> 90%
    >
    > The 40% is way too small. I can experiment around with it a little,
    > but are there any guidelines for the percentages? Is > 100% allowed?


    Yes and yes... There is the standard orthodox line that you will
    have read from Flavell on the first question. It is perfectly
    right. Study it and then in a real situation that calls for it,
    set the base to be less than 100% anyway... But try as hard as
    you can to avoid this for the reasons he gives. You won't
    understand what I am saying until you have more experience and
    deal with many real clients in the commercial world, so my point
    for now to you is, it is about as sinful as a Catholic couple
    using morning after pill.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jun 5, 2006
    #18
  19. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 04:21:19 +0200, Sid Ismail <>
    wrote:

    >Get a decent one - Textpad, EditPad (even Lite), etc etc


    I'm a user of EditPad pro and I tried Textpad. Both of those are good
    for writing HTML code, but not for creating an HTML document. Borland
    Developer Studio 2006 has a WYSIWYG HTML interface, but (1) it doesn't
    have spell checking, and (2) it can't read in a lot of already-created
    HTML documents. Word (with the save filtered) is good, except that I
    have to manually change font-size to percentages. The save filtered
    option strips out at least 5KB of unneeded stuff.
    ---
    Replace you know what by j to email
     
    Jud McCranie, Jun 13, 2006
    #19
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