chatting through jsp

Discussion in 'Java' started by iceman, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. iceman

    iceman Guest

    i want to design a s/w that could be used to chat on the
    internet..........
    i thaught of sending html pages to clients using their responce
    objects......but the problem is that they are created only

    when a request comes in....and also their scope could not be
    explicitly controlled..................
    maybe i could send messages to the client using their IP
    addresses.....
    ofcourse without their requesting for it.....
    any other idea ia also welcome......
    iceman, Jul 16, 2008
    #1
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  2. iceman

    Guest

    On Jul 16, 2:28 am, iceman <> wrote:
    > i want to design a s/w that could be used to chat on the
    > internet..........
    > i thaught of sending html pages to clients using their responce
    > objects......but the problem is that they are created only
    >
    > when a request comes in....and also their scope could not be
    > explicitly controlled..................
    > maybe i could send messages to the client using their IP
    > addresses.....
    > ofcourse without their requesting for it.....
    > any other idea ia also welcome......


    Really cool idea, iceman!
    And what will be listening for such request?
    If that could be possible then hackers don't need to spend any efforts
    to write viruses, trojans or other malicious software.
    Just go directly to the computer and do whatever you want to do.

    Alex.
    http://www.myjavaserver.com/~alexfromohio/
    , Jul 16, 2008
    #2
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  3. On Jul 21, 9:54 pm, Lew <com.lewscanon@lew> wrote:
    > Sabine Dinis Blochberger wrote:
    > > iceman wrote:

    >
    > >> i want to design a s/w that could be used to chat on the
    > >> internet..........
    > >> i thaught of sending html pages to clients using their responce
    > >> objects......but the problem is that they are created only

    >
    > >> when a request comes in....and also their scope could not be
    > >> explicitly controlled..................
    > >> maybe i could send messages to the client using their IP
    > >> addresses.....
    > >> ofcourse without their requesting for it.....
    > >> any other idea ia also welcome......

    >
    > > You don't need to reinvent this wheel. If you're so inclined, have a
    > > look at the following XMPP solution:
    > > <http://zeank.in-berlin.de/jsjac/> - it's an AJAX XMPP client for use in
    > > web browsers. You will need a XMPP server on the other side, though, why
    > > not <http://www.igniterealtime.org/projects/openfire/index.jsp>

    >
    > > In any case, at <http://www.jabber.org/> you can find many alternatives..

    >
    > I can't say that it's the best, or the worst, or anything in between, but
    > OpenFire works well, installs readily and has yet to crash unexpectedly for
    > me.  The only gotcha was that I have to specify JAVA_HOME on the command line
    > when I sudo..


    Uhh.. 'sudo'? Was that a typo., or am I more
    drunk than I suspected(/deserve)?

    >.. the startup, on this Ubuntu box.


    OK - I've heard of Ubuntu - I'm not *that* ignorant!

    --
    Andrew Thompson
    http://pscode.org/
    Andrew Thompson, Jul 21, 2008
    #3
  4. iceman

    Lew Guest

    On Jul 21, 8:19 am, Andrew Thompson <> wrote:
    > On Jul 21, 9:54 pm, Lew <com.lewscanon@lew> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Sabine Dinis Blochberger wrote:
    > > > iceman wrote:

    >
    > > >> i want to design a s/w that could be used to chat on the
    > > >> internet..........
    > > >> i thaught of sending html pages to clients using their responce
    > > >> objects......but the problem is that they are created only

    >
    > > >> when a request comes in....and also their scope could not be
    > > >> explicitly controlled..................
    > > >> maybe i could send messages to the client using their IP
    > > >> addresses.....
    > > >> ofcourse without their requesting for it.....
    > > >> any other idea ia also welcome......

    >
    > > > You don't need to reinvent this wheel. If you're so inclined, have a
    > > > look at the following XMPP solution:
    > > > <http://zeank.in-berlin.de/jsjac/> - it's an AJAX XMPP client for use in
    > > > web browsers. You will need a XMPP server on the other side, though, why
    > > > not <http://www.igniterealtime.org/projects/openfire/index.jsp>

    >
    > > > In any case, at <http://www.jabber.org/> you can find many alternatives.

    >
    > > I can't say that it's the best, or the worst, or anything in between, but
    > > OpenFire works well, installs readily and has yet to crash unexpectedly for
    > > me.  The only gotcha was that I have to specify JAVA_HOME on the command line
    > > when I sudo..

    >
    > Uhh.. 'sudo'?  Was that a typo., or am I more
    > drunk than I suspected(/deserve)?


    The latter.

    > >.. the startup, on this Ubuntu box.

    >
    > OK - I've heard of Ubuntu - I'm not *that* ignorant!


    'sudo' is the command to run a command with root (or other user)
    privileges. Ubuntu doesn't actually let you log in directly as root;
    you have to prefix a command with 'sudo' and give a password to run
    certain commands. OpenFire needed strong access to certain
    directories so I start it with a 'sudo JAVA_HOME=/opt/java/java
    openfire.sh start' command, or something like that. (I'm not near
    that box now to check.)

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Jul 21, 2008
    #4
  5. iceman

    Mark Space Guest

    Lew wrote:

    >
    > 'sudo' is the command to run a command with root (or other user)
    > privileges. Ubuntu doesn't actually let you log in directly as root;


    For those more familiar with traditional Unix systems, sudo is like the
    'su' sommand -- switch user or super-user. Unlike su, sudo runs a
    command instead of giving you a shell. sudo is supposed to be safer
    since it prevents accidental changes due to typos and such.

    sudo has been around for a while and I think is available on all the
    'nix's now.
    Mark Space, Jul 22, 2008
    #5
  6. iceman

    Lars Enderin Guest

    Mark Space wrote:
    > Lew wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> 'sudo' is the command to run a command with root (or other user)
    >> privileges. Ubuntu doesn't actually let you log in directly as root;

    >
    > For those more familiar with traditional Unix systems, sudo is like the
    > 'su' sommand -- switch user or super-user. Unlike su, sudo runs a
    > command instead of giving you a shell. sudo is supposed to be safer
    > since it prevents accidental changes due to typos and such.
    >

    If you use sudo to start an xterm, for example, you can type new
    commands as root without the sudo prefix. In my Ubuntu there is also a
    root terminal utility.
    Lars Enderin, Jul 22, 2008
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    Lew <com.lewscanon@lew> wrote:

    > Lars Enderin wrote:
    > > Mark Space wrote:
    > >> Lew wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>
    > >>> 'sudo' is the command to run a command with root (or other user)
    > >>> privileges. Ubuntu doesn't actually let you log in directly as root;
    > >>
    > >> For those more familiar with traditional Unix systems, sudo is like
    > >> the 'su' sommand -- switch user or super-user. Unlike su, sudo runs a
    > >> command instead of giving you a shell. sudo is supposed to be safer
    > >> since it prevents accidental changes due to typos and such.
    > >>

    > > If you use sudo to start an xterm, for example, you can type new
    > > commands as root without the sudo prefix. In my Ubuntu there is also a
    > > root terminal utility.

    >
    > Since 'sh' (or 'bash') is a command, as 'xterm' is, it can be sudoed. Thus
    > 'sudo' sacrifices none of the power of 'su'. The "root terminal utility" is
    > nothing more nor less than the "terminal utility".


    Indeed, sudo -s offers a convenient way to invoke your defined shell,
    with the attendant risk. The benefits of sudo lie somewhat more in
    sudoers, which allows unprivileged users to execute well-defined,
    privileged commands. See the sudoers manual, for example,

    <http://www.gratisoft.us/sudo/man/sudoers.html>

    [Sorry this is OT for the thread, but I think it's apropos to Java
    programming generally.]

    --
    John B. Matthews
    trashgod at gmail dot com
    home dot woh dot rr dot com slash jbmatthews
    John B. Matthews, Jul 22, 2008
    #7
  8. iceman

    thufir Guest

    On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 05:19:19 -0700, Andrew Thompson wrote:

    >> I can't say that it's the best, or the worst, or anything in between,
    >> but OpenFire works well, installs readily and has yet to crash
    >> unexpectedly for me.  The only gotcha was that I have to specify
    >> JAVA_HOME on the command line when I sudo..

    >
    > Uhh.. 'sudo'? Was that a typo., or am I more drunk than I
    > suspected(/deserve)?



    Maybe more linux related, so take there, but, why are you mucking with
    JAVA_HOME? That should be configured in ubuntu when you run sudo (you're
    no more drunk than usual, Andrew) and configure Java.



    -Thufir
    thufir, Jul 23, 2008
    #8
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