Compiled Code accessing New User Controls at runtime

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Earl Teigrob, Apr 2, 2004.

  1. Earl Teigrob

    Earl Teigrob Guest

    I am writing an application that dynamically loads user controls at run time
    based on user options. I would like to give my users the ability to build
    their own user controls and add them to my user control folder so that they
    can be selected and loaded at run time also. These new controls will need to
    have access to many of the classes with there properties and methods within
    the complied code. Is this possible? This seems to be the reverse of most
    situations where the programmer accesses an object and uses its
    functionality. I want my code to dynamically load a new user control created
    by a programmer who does not have access to my source code. Is there any
    reference material on doing such a thing?

    Thanks for you help!!!

    Earl
     
    Earl Teigrob, Apr 2, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. With interface file client can compile UserControl code without have your
    page code!

    If your pages or classes expose a public interface you can do this.

    Example :

    public interface IA
    {
    ....
    void Pippo();
    }

    public class A : IA
    {
    ...
    public void Pippo() { ... };
    }

    public interface IPublicPageForUser
    {
    ....
    IA GetAObject();
    }

    public MyPage : Page, IPublicPageForUser
    {
    public IA GetAObject()
    {
    A aObj = new A();
    return (IA)aObj;
    }
    }


    the user control retrieve the object A with :

    IA aObj = ((IPublicPageForUser)this.Page).GetAObject()
    aObj.Pippo();

    I hope that my example is clear and good for your work.

    Brun

    "Earl Teigrob" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am writing an application that dynamically loads user controls at run

    time
    > based on user options. I would like to give my users the ability to build
    > their own user controls and add them to my user control folder so that

    they
    > can be selected and loaded at run time also. These new controls will need

    to
    > have access to many of the classes with there properties and methods

    within
    > the complied code. Is this possible? This seems to be the reverse of most
    > situations where the programmer accesses an object and uses its
    > functionality. I want my code to dynamically load a new user control

    created
    > by a programmer who does not have access to my source code. Is there any
    > reference material on doing such a thing?
    >
    > Thanks for you help!!!
    >
    > Earl
    >
    >
     
    Bruno Sirianni, Apr 2, 2004
    #2
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  3. Bruno, I've been playing with this for a case very similar to Earl's. Your example is a big help--thank you

    One thing, can you or anybody explain the differences/implications of creating an interface versus using operations in the system.reflection class, or is that sort of the same thing? Maybe the difference between early and late binding

    For example (vb syntax), from within my user control
    Dim mi As System.Reflection.MethodInf
    mi = Page.GetType.GetMethod("PageFunction"
    mi.Invoke(Page, Nothing

    If I have a function called PageFunction on the page that I load this user control from, it gets called from the user control, and I can pass parameters, etc

    Any thoughts

    Thanks

    Bil

    Earl, afaik, you're on exactly the right track--getting them from disk at runtime is one of the big advantages of user controls. There's a pretty good discussion of dynamic user controls in Walther's ASP.NET Unleashed book, but it stops short of telling you how to go back and get methods and properties in the parent page

    ----- Bruno Sirianni wrote: ----

    With interface file client can compile UserControl code without have you
    page code

    If your pages or classes expose a public interface you can do this

    Example

    public interface I

    ...
    void Pippo()


    public class A : I

    ..
    public void Pippo() { ... }


    public interface IPublicPageForUse

    ...
    IA GetAObject()


    public MyPage : Page, IPublicPageForUse

    public IA GetAObject(

    A aObj = new A()
    return (IA)aObj




    the user control retrieve the object A with

    IA aObj = ((IPublicPageForUser)this.Page).GetAObject(
    aObj.Pippo()

    I hope that my example is clear and good for your work

    Bru

    "Earl Teigrob" <> wrote in messag
    news:..
    > I am writing an application that dynamically loads user controls at ru

    tim
    > based on user options. I would like to give my users the ability to buil
    > their own user controls and add them to my user control folder so tha

    the
    > can be selected and loaded at run time also. These new controls will nee

    t
    > have access to many of the classes with there properties and method

    withi
    > the complied code. Is this possible? This seems to be the reverse of mos
    > situations where the programmer accesses an object and uses it
    > functionality. I want my code to dynamically load a new user contro

    create
    > by a programmer who does not have access to my source code. Is there an
    > reference material on doing such a thing
    >> Thanks for you help!!
    >> Ear
    >>
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QmlsbCBCb3Jn?=, Apr 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Reflection code is slow. With Reflection you can invoche all method and can
    see all code! This is not good idea if you don't now who use your code!
    If I declare a function private is because this can be used only by my code
    class. If another class invoke this function in the wrong way can make
    disaster an application, or not?

    If your class expose a public interface you can use this without now its
    Type.

    interface IHello
    {
    void write();
    }

    class Hello : IHello //english class
    {
    public void write()
    {
    Console.Writeln("Hello");
    }
    }

    class Ciao : IHello //italian class
    {
    public void write()
    {
    Console.Writeln( "Ciao");
    }
    }

    //Program
    void Begin(IHello h)
    {
    h.write();
    }

    if IHello is Ciao class the program write "Ciao" otherwise write "Hello",
    but your code never change!

    Interface can be compiled in separated project so you can have dll with only
    interface and no code. User in this way can develop UserControl without your
    code!


    Brun

    "Bill Borg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Bruno, I've been playing with this for a case very similar to Earl's.

    Your example is a big help--thank you!
    >
    > One thing, can you or anybody explain the differences/implications of

    creating an interface versus using operations in the system.reflection
    class, or is that sort of the same thing? Maybe the difference between
    early and late binding?
    >
    > For example (vb syntax), from within my user control:
    > Dim mi As System.Reflection.MethodInfo
    > mi = Page.GetType.GetMethod("PageFunction")
    > mi.Invoke(Page, Nothing)
    >
    > If I have a function called PageFunction on the page that I load this user

    control from, it gets called from the user control, and I can pass
    parameters, etc.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Bill
    >
    > Earl, afaik, you're on exactly the right track--getting them from disk at

    runtime is one of the big advantages of user controls. There's a pretty
    good discussion of dynamic user controls in Walther's ASP.NET Unleashed
    book, but it stops short of telling you how to go back and get methods and
    properties in the parent page.
    >
    > ----- Bruno Sirianni wrote: -----
    >
    > With interface file client can compile UserControl code without have

    your
    > page code!
    >
    > If your pages or classes expose a public interface you can do this.
    >
    > Example :
    >
    > public interface IA
    > {
    > ....
    > void Pippo();
    > }
    >
    > public class A : IA
    > {
    > ...
    > public void Pippo() { ... };
    > }
    >
    > public interface IPublicPageForUser
    > {
    > ....
    > IA GetAObject();
    > }
    >
    > public MyPage : Page, IPublicPageForUser
    > {
    > public IA GetAObject()
    > {
    > A aObj = new A();
    > return (IA)aObj;
    > }
    > }
    >
    >
    > the user control retrieve the object A with :
    >
    > IA aObj = ((IPublicPageForUser)this.Page).GetAObject()
    > aObj.Pippo();
    >
    > I hope that my example is clear and good for your work.
    >
    > Brun
    >
    > "Earl Teigrob" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I am writing an application that dynamically loads user controls at

    run
    > time
    > > based on user options. I would like to give my users the ability to

    build
    > > their own user controls and add them to my user control folder so

    that
    > they
    > > can be selected and loaded at run time also. These new controls

    will need
    > to
    > > have access to many of the classes with there properties and

    methods
    > within
    > > the complied code. Is this possible? This seems to be the reverse

    of most
    > > situations where the programmer accesses an object and uses its
    > > functionality. I want my code to dynamically load a new user

    control
    > created
    > > by a programmer who does not have access to my source code. Is

    there any
    > > reference material on doing such a thing?
    > >> Thanks for you help!!!
    > >> Earl
    > >>
     
    Bruno Sirianni, Apr 3, 2004
    #4
  5. Again, very very helpful, thank you sir

    ----- Bruno Sirianni wrote: ----

    Reflection code is slow. With Reflection you can invoche all method and ca
    see all code! This is not good idea if you don't now who use your code
    If I declare a function private is because this can be used only by my cod
    class. If another class invoke this function in the wrong way can mak
    disaster an application, or not

    If your class expose a public interface you can use this without now it
    Type

    interface IHell

    void write()


    class Hello : IHello //english clas

    public void write(

    Console.Writeln("Hello")



    class Ciao : IHello //italian clas

    public void write(

    Console.Writeln( "Ciao")



    //Progra
    void Begin(IHello h

    h.write()


    if IHello is Ciao class the program write "Ciao" otherwise write "Hello"
    but your code never change

    Interface can be compiled in separated project so you can have dll with onl
    interface and no code. User in this way can develop UserControl without you
    code


    Bru

    "Bill Borg" <> wrote in messag
    news:..
    > Bruno, I've been playing with this for a case very similar to Earl's

    Your example is a big help--thank you
    >> One thing, can you or anybody explain the differences/implications o

    creating an interface versus using operations in the system.reflectio
    class, or is that sort of the same thing? Maybe the difference betwee
    early and late binding
    >> For example (vb syntax), from within my user control

    > Dim mi As System.Reflection.MethodInf
    > mi = Page.GetType.GetMethod("PageFunction"
    > mi.Invoke(Page, Nothing
    >> If I have a function called PageFunction on the page that I load this use

    control from, it gets called from the user control, and I can pas
    parameters, etc
    >> Any thoughts
    >> Thanks
    >> Bil
    >> Earl, afaik, you're on exactly the right track--getting them from disk a

    runtime is one of the big advantages of user controls. There's a prett
    good discussion of dynamic user controls in Walther's ASP.NET Unleashe
    book, but it stops short of telling you how to go back and get methods an
    properties in the parent page
    >> ----- Bruno Sirianni wrote: ----
    >> With interface file client can compile UserControl code without hav

    you
    > page code
    >> If your pages or classes expose a public interface you can do this
    >> Example
    >> public interface I

    >
    > ...
    > void Pippo()
    >
    >> public class A : I

    >
    > ..
    > public void Pippo() { ... }
    >
    >> public interface IPublicPageForUse

    >
    > ...
    > IA GetAObject()
    >
    >> public MyPage : Page, IPublicPageForUse

    >
    > public IA GetAObject(
    >
    > A aObj = new A()
    > return (IA)aObj
    >
    >
    >>> the user control retrieve the object A with

    >> IA aObj = ((IPublicPageForUser)this.Page).GetAObject(

    > aObj.Pippo()
    >> I hope that my example is clear and good for your work
    >> Bru
    >> "Earl Teigrob" <> wrote in messag

    > news:..
    >> I am writing an application that dynamically loads user controls a

    ru
    > tim
    >> based on user options. I would like to give my users the ability t

    buil
    >> their own user controls and add them to my user control folder s

    that
    > they
    >> can be selected and loaded at run time also. These new controls

    will need
    > to
    >> have access to many of the classes with there properties and

    methods
    > within
    >> the complied code. Is this possible? This seems to be the reverse

    of most
    >> situations where the programmer accesses an object and uses its
    >> functionality. I want my code to dynamically load a new user

    control
    > created
    >> by a programmer who does not have access to my source code. Is

    there any
    >> reference material on doing such a thing?
    >>> Thanks for you help!!!
    >>> Earl
    >>>
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QmlsbCBCb3Jn?=, Apr 4, 2004
    #5
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