copyright

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Morris, Dec 2, 2003.

  1. Morris

    Morris Guest

    I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm sure
    you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a copyright
    picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website, will I be
    violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is different from the
    picture that I took from the coptyrighted part from?
    Morris, Dec 2, 2003
    #1
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  2. Morris

    brucie Guest

    in post <news:BzRyb.33216$>
    Morris said:

    > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question


    it is not

    > If I cut out a part of a copyright picture and add it to my own
    > creation to put on my website, will I be violating the copyright law
    > even if the picture I made is different from the picture that I took
    > from the coptyrighted part from?


    what made you think asking in a newsgroup would be a good idea? the best
    and only advice is to talk to your lawyer.

    while you're waiting for the appointment with your lawyer you may want
    to google on "derivative works" for a bit of background information.

    http://www.google.com/search?num=50&q=derivative works

    --
    brucie
    02/December/2003 11:14:27 am kilo
    brucie, Dec 2, 2003
    #2
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  3. Morris

    Morris Guest

    Thanks for the nice friendly answer. I chose a newsgroup because this deals
    with a web site. I'm sure others would be interested in the same
    information.
    "brucie" <> wrote in message
    news:bqgpd5$20odqj$-berlin.de...
    > in post <news:BzRyb.33216$>
    > Morris said:
    >
    > > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question

    >
    > it is not
    >
    > > If I cut out a part of a copyright picture and add it to my own
    > > creation to put on my website, will I be violating the copyright law
    > > even if the picture I made is different from the picture that I took
    > > from the coptyrighted part from?

    >
    > what made you think asking in a newsgroup would be a good idea? the best
    > and only advice is to talk to your lawyer.
    >
    > while you're waiting for the appointment with your lawyer you may want
    > to google on "derivative works" for a bit of background information.
    >
    > http://www.google.com/search?num=50&q=derivative works
    >
    > --
    > brucie
    > 02/December/2003 11:14:27 am kilo
    Morris, Dec 2, 2003
    #3
  4. Morris

    Morris Guest

    I found my answer at the address you sent me to. Thank you.
    "brucie" <> wrote in message
    news:bqgpd5$20odqj$-berlin.de...
    > in post <news:BzRyb.33216$>
    > Morris said:
    >
    > > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question

    >
    > it is not
    >
    > > If I cut out a part of a copyright picture and add it to my own
    > > creation to put on my website, will I be violating the copyright law
    > > even if the picture I made is different from the picture that I took
    > > from the coptyrighted part from?

    >
    > what made you think asking in a newsgroup would be a good idea? the best
    > and only advice is to talk to your lawyer.
    >
    > while you're waiting for the appointment with your lawyer you may want
    > to google on "derivative works" for a bit of background information.
    >
    > http://www.google.com/search?num=50&q=derivative works
    >
    > --
    > brucie
    > 02/December/2003 11:14:27 am kilo
    Morris, Dec 2, 2003
    #4
  5. Morris

    brucie Guest

    in post <news:XzSyb.36765$>
    Morris said:

    > Thanks for the nice friendly answer.


    you're welcome. i'm always friendly no matter how stupid questions are.

    please don't toppost

    --
    brucie
    02/December/2003 12:54:59 pm kilo
    brucie, Dec 2, 2003
    #5
  6. Morris

    Richard Guest

    Morris! wrote:

    > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm sure
    > you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a copyright
    > picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website, will I be
    > violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is different from
    > the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part from?


    Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or a
    scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright owner
    can't do a damn about it.
    If the cut out is that of a person and the person can be identified, then
    yes, you could be in trouble.
    Richard, Dec 2, 2003
    #6
  7. Richard wrote:
    > Morris! wrote:
    >
    >> I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but
    >> I'm sure you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a
    >> part of a copyright picture and add it to my own creation to put
    >> on my website, will I be violating the copyright law even if the
    >> picture I made is different from the picture that I took from the
    >> coptyrighted part from?

    >
    > Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building,
    > or a scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the
    > copyright owner can't do a damn about it.


    I smell BS. Richard, are you a lawyer?

    --
    Joel.
    Joel Shepherd, Dec 2, 2003
    #7
  8. In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    > Morris! wrote:
    >
    > > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm sure
    > > you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a copyright
    > > picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website, will I be
    > > violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is different from
    > > the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part from?

    >
    > Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or a
    > scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright owner
    > can't do a damn about it.


    Rubbish. If I take a photo of you *I* own the copyright. The same is
    that case with buildings or scenes of nature. It's the image that's
    copyrighted, not what's in it.

    --
    Hywel I do not eat quiche
    http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/
    http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/mfaq.php
    Hywel Jenkins, Dec 2, 2003
    #8
  9. Morris

    Eric Bohlman Guest

    "Richard" <anonymous@127.000> wrote in
    news::

    > Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or
    > a scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright
    > owner can't do a damn about it.


    That has nothing to do with it. Entire photographs are almost *never* in
    the public domain, regardless of their subject. Rules for fair use vary
    from country to country, but again they aren't based on subject matter.

    > If the cut out is that of a person and the person can be identified,
    > then yes, you could be in trouble.


    That's a completely different issue from copyright. Even if you do have
    permission from the copyright holder to use a photo, you may *also* need
    permission from the subject to use his likeness.
    Eric Bohlman, Dec 2, 2003
    #9
  10. Morris

    Sid Ismail Guest

    On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 02:14:15 GMT, "Morris" <> wrote:

    : Thanks for the nice friendly answer. I chose a newsgroup because this deals
    : with a web site. I'm sure others would be interested in the same
    : information.


    Others here all ex-lawyers.

    Sid
    Sid Ismail, Dec 2, 2003
    #10
  11. Morris

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <BzRyb.33216$>,
    says...
    > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm sure
    > you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a copyright
    > picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website, will I be
    > violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is different from the
    > picture that I took from the coptyrighted part from?


    Yes, you are violating the law. (Of course there are a few exceptions)
    You took an original work and without the authors (or artist in this
    case) permission you altered it.

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Dec 2, 2003
    #11
  12. Morris

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    > > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm sure
    > > you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a copyright
    > > picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website, will I be
    > > violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is different from
    > > the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part from?

    >
    > Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or a
    > scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright owner
    > can't do a damn about it.


    A photograph of the building is fair use, using someone else's pictures
    (or part of) the same building is not (necessarily) fair use.

    > If the cut out is that of a person and the person can be identified, then
    > yes, you could be in trouble.


    ESPECIALLY if that person is a minor

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Dec 2, 2003
    #12
  13. Morris

    Dylan Parry Guest

    Morris wrote:

    > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm
    > sure you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a
    > copyright picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website,
    > will I be violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is
    > different from the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part from?


    The best advice I can give, not being a lawyer, is to simply not use
    images from websites unless you know they are royalty-free or public
    domain images. If in doubt simply don't use the image.

    --
    Dylan Parry
    http://www.webpageworkshop.co.uk - FREE Web tutorials and references
    Now playing: Yes - Perpetual Change from "The Yes Album"
    Dylan Parry, Dec 2, 2003
    #13
  14. Morris

    Morris Guest

    "Morris" <> wrote in message
    news:BzRyb.33216$...
    > I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm sure
    > you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a copyright
    > picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website, will I be
    > violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is different from

    the
    > picture that I took from the coptyrighted part from?
    >


    Thank you. Now I know which way I'll go. The web page
    http://www.copyright.gov/ was also helpfull.
    Morris, Dec 2, 2003
    #14
  15. Morris

    Richard Guest

    Hywel! wrote:

    > In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    >> Morris! wrote:
    >>
    > >> I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm
    > >> sure you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a
    > >>copyright picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website,
    > >>will I be violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is
    > >>different from the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part
    > >>from?

    >>
    >> Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or a
    >> scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright
    >> owner can't do a damn about it.


    > Rubbish. If I take a photo of you *I* own the copyright. The same is
    > that case with buildings or scenes of nature. It's the image that's
    > copyrighted, not what's in it.


    If I take a picture of Mt. Rushmore, I own the copyright to "THAT" photo.
    Not the contents.
    If I publish that photo, sell it, can I sue others for taking the same photo
    from the same spot?
    No.
    What if I take an exclusive photo of GW Bush standing in front of Mt.
    Rushmore?
    Then after I publish and sell the photo, others do to.
    That sir, is copyright infringement.
    Actually, the person could be any one. What that does is clearly defines the
    photo as mine. Not public domain.

    One guy tried suing a newspaper becuase the paper used his airplane, with
    the numbers blocked out, saying this was a typical drug runner's plane. The
    court didn't buy the argument. The paper did not say who owned the plane.

    "Derivative works" means something I created, then later after copyrighting
    that, I do something else to it and want to claim copyright on that as well.

    Read all about copyright at the US Copyright office.
    I have.


    > --
    > Hywel I do not eat quiche
    > http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/
    > http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/mfaq.php
    Richard, Dec 2, 2003
    #15
  16. Morris

    Richard Guest

    Whitecrest! wrote:

    > In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    > >> I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm
    > >> sure you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a
    > >>copyright picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website,
    > >>will I be violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is
    > >>different from the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part
    > >>from?

    >>
    >> Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or a
    >> scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright
    >> owner can't do a damn about it.


    Who's to say two people didn't take the same photo?
    Go to lake Tahoe. Go around the road. You'll find a spot where there is an
    island just off shore.
    That same photo I have seen dozens of places, including in my dad's library.
    The Golden Gate Bridge? Every tourist with a camera takes the same pictures
    by the hour.
    Google returned 2200 hits for Mt. Rushmore.
    Each and every one is copyrighted by the owner. Yet they are all the same
    subject matter.
    Technically, you can't copyright items in "public domain" or in "fair use".



    > A photograph of the building is fair use, using someone else's pictures
    > (or part of) the same building is not (necessarily) fair use.


    >> If the cut out is that of a person and the person can be identified,
    >> then yes, you could be in trouble.


    > ESPECIALLY if that person is a minor


    > --
    > Whitecrest Entertainment
    > www.whitecrestent.com
    Richard, Dec 2, 2003
    #16
  17. Morris

    Richard Guest

    Joel! wrote:

    > Richard wrote:
    >> Morris! wrote:
    >>
    >>> I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but
    >>> I'm sure you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a
    >>> part of a copyright picture and add it to my own creation to put
    >>> on my website, will I be violating the copyright law even if the
    >>> picture I made is different from the picture that I took from the
    >>> coptyrighted part from?

    >>
    >> Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building,
    >> or a scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the
    >> copyright owner can't do a damn about it.


    > I smell BS. Richard, are you a lawyer?


    http://www.loc.gov/copyright/


    > --
    > Joel.
    Richard, Dec 2, 2003
    #17
  18. In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    > Hywel! wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    > >> Morris! wrote:
    > >>
    > > >> I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but I'm
    > > >> sure you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of a
    > > >>copyright picture and add it to my own creation to put on my website,
    > > >>will I be violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is
    > > >>different from the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part
    > > >>from?
    > >>
    > >> Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or a
    > >> scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright
    > >> owner can't do a damn about it.

    >
    > > Rubbish. If I take a photo of you *I* own the copyright. The same is
    > > that case with buildings or scenes of nature. It's the image that's
    > > copyrighted, not what's in it.

    >
    > If I take a picture of Mt. Rushmore, I own the copyright to "THAT" photo.
    > Not the contents.


    Correct. That's what I said, retard.

    > If I publish that photo, sell it, can I sue others for taking the same photo
    > from the same spot?
    > No.


    Correct. That's what I said, retard.

    > What if I take an exclusive photo of GW Bush standing in front of Mt.
    > Rushmore?
    > Then after I publish and sell the photo, others do to.
    > That sir, is copyright infringement.


    Correct. That's what I said, retard.


    > Read all about copyright at the US Copyright office.


    You can hardly read. You're an idiot and we know you're an idiot.
    There's no need for you to continuously remind us.

    --
    Hywel I do not eat quiche
    http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/
    http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/mfaq.php
    Hywel Jenkins, Dec 2, 2003
    #18
  19. "Richard" <anonymous@127.000> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hywel! wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    > >> Morris! wrote:
    > >>
    > > >> I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question but

    I'm
    > > >> sure you will direct me to the right place. If I cut out a part of

    a
    > > >>copyright picture and add it to my own creation to put on my

    website,
    > > >>will I be violating the copyright law even if the picture I made is
    > > >>different from the picture that I took from the coptyrighted part
    > > >>from?
    > >>
    > >> Depends on the nature of the cut out part. If it is of a building, or

    a
    > >> scene of nature, that is public domain, fair use, then the copyright
    > >> owner can't do a damn about it.

    >
    > > Rubbish. If I take a photo of you *I* own the copyright. The same is
    > > that case with buildings or scenes of nature. It's the image that's
    > > copyrighted, not what's in it.

    >
    > If I take a picture of Mt. Rushmore, I own the copyright to "THAT" photo.
    > Not the contents.
    > If I publish that photo, sell it, can I sue others for taking the same

    photo
    > from the same spot?
    > No.
    > What if I take an exclusive photo of GW Bush standing in front of Mt.
    > Rushmore?
    > Then after I publish and sell the photo, others do to.
    > That sir, is copyright infringement.
    > Actually, the person could be any one. What that does is clearly defines

    the
    > photo as mine. Not public domain.
    >
    > One guy tried suing a newspaper becuase the paper used his airplane, with
    > the numbers blocked out, saying this was a typical drug runner's plane.

    The
    > court didn't buy the argument. The paper did not say who owned the plane.
    >
    > "Derivative works" means something I created, then later after

    copyrighting
    > that, I do something else to it and want to claim copyright on that as

    well.
    >
    > Read all about copyright at the US Copyright office.
    > I have.




    That's not the scenerio the original poster was referring to at all. He was
    saying that if he literally takes a copyrighted photo...and only uses a part
    of that photo...is he in violation. Yes, he is. He's taken a part of a
    copyrighted photo and claimed it as his own. You can't do that.


    --Tina
    --
    http://www.AffordableHOST.com
    20% Discount Code: newsgroup
    We transfer time from your current host!
    Serving the web since 1997
    Tina - AffordableHOST.com, Dec 2, 2003
    #19
  20. Morris

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <>, anonymous@127.000 says...
    > If I take a picture of Mt. Rushmore, I own the copyright to "THAT" photo.
    > Not the contents.
    > If I publish that photo, sell it, can I sue others for taking the same photo
    > from the same spot?
    > No.


    But you can sue them for using YOUR photo from that spot.

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Dec 2, 2003
    #20
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