Course Materials

Discussion in 'Java' started by pemo, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. pemo

    pemo Guest

    I've just been told that I have to teach two three hour sessions on - 'an
    intro to java' in early January. Looks like I'm faced with having to work
    through Christmas, or find some friendly source for 'inspiration'.

    Any suggestions most welcome!

    x-posted:comp.lang.java.advocacy; comp.lang.java.help;
    comp.lang.java-programmer
     
    pemo, Dec 20, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. pemo

    Guest

    I wrote the whole bunch of Java intro lessons, which are located over
    here:
    http://www.smartdataprocessing.com



    pemo wrote:
    > I've just been told that I have to teach two three hour sessions on - 'an
    > intro to java' in early January. Looks like I'm faced with having to work
    > through Christmas, or find some friendly source for 'inspiration'.
    >
    > Any suggestions most welcome!
    >
    > x-posted:comp.lang.java.advocacy; comp.lang.java.help;
    > comp.lang.java-programmer
     
    , Dec 20, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Paulus de Boska, Dec 20, 2005
    #3
  4. pemo

    zero Guest

    "pemo" <> wrote in
    news:do9nsr$5im$:

    > I've just been told that I have to teach two three hour sessions on -
    > 'an intro to java' in early January. Looks like I'm faced with having
    > to work through Christmas, or find some friendly source for
    > 'inspiration'.
    >
    > Any suggestions most welcome!
    >
    > x-posted:comp.lang.java.advocacy; comp.lang.java.help;
    > comp.lang.java-programmer
    >
    >


    A lot depends on your audience. Do they have a background in OOAD? Do
    they know other OO languages, or non-OO languages?

    Deitel & Associates, Inc. (www.deitel.com) has a lot of teacher's
    resources, including lecture slides, examples and student files. Sun's
    Java site (java.sun.com) has a lot of online tutorials, some of which can
    be downloaded for offline viewing. My suggestion would be to first think
    about what you need in respect of what your students already know, and then
    search for appropriate material online.

    --
    Beware the False Authority Syndrome
     
    zero, Dec 21, 2005
    #4
  5. pemo

    Rhino Guest

    "zero" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9733900C161EEzerothishi@195.130.132.70...
    > "pemo" <> wrote in
    > news:do9nsr$5im$:
    >
    >> I've just been told that I have to teach two three hour sessions on -
    >> 'an intro to java' in early January. Looks like I'm faced with having
    >> to work through Christmas, or find some friendly source for
    >> 'inspiration'.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions most welcome!
    >>
    >> x-posted:comp.lang.java.advocacy; comp.lang.java.help;
    >> comp.lang.java-programmer
    >>
    >>

    >
    > A lot depends on your audience. Do they have a background in OOAD? Do
    > they know other OO languages, or non-OO languages?
    >
    > Deitel & Associates, Inc. (www.deitel.com) has a lot of teacher's
    > resources, including lecture slides, examples and student files. Sun's
    > Java site (java.sun.com) has a lot of online tutorials, some of which can
    > be downloaded for offline viewing. My suggestion would be to first think
    > about what you need in respect of what your students already know, and
    > then
    > search for appropriate material online.
    >

    I agree with zero on this.

    Two 3-hour sessions on Java is not very much at all. A proper course to
    teach Java thoroughly would probably run for a week at the very least,
    probably several weeks, assuming the student had no previous programming
    experience. You can't cover very much ground at all in six hours....

    I'm a very big believer in exercises to reinforce knowledge. I rarely
    understand things until I've had a chance to apply them and I've found that
    this applies to many other students as well. (I've spent years earning the
    bulk of my income from teaching computer courses.) But with only six hours
    at your disposal, I think you'll want to choose your content very carefully
    and exercises are probably not going to be a top priority.

    What to choose for your course really depends on what the purpose of the
    course is.

    _IF_ the students are simply attending your course to get an overview of
    Java and will _definitely_ have a much longer course afterwards covering
    Java thoroughly, then you would probably be best to present basic OO and
    Java concepts to give them a good foundation for the follow-on course.
    Time permitting, you could even have a short exercise where they write,
    compile and execute a Hello World program or something not much more
    sophisticated.

    However, _IF_ your students are going to decide whether to take the
    follow-on course based on your course, things get trickier. Then you
    probably need to make an effort to "sell" the follow-on course with your
    course. You'll need to excite them about Java and show them all the magical
    things it can do without giving them a dishonest picture of the language.
    (You don't want to tell them that it is the easiest language in the world,
    that they will be able to write sophisticated, well-designed programs the
    first day, or other such nonsense.) But you can highlight Java's many
    excellent features, the concept of WORE (Write Once Run Everywhere)
    [although you may want to warn them that some platform differences will
    likely still have to be addressed], the wealth of slick developer tools for
    Java, the greatly improved performance since the early days of Java, and so
    forth. You can also demonstrate some of the better programs and tools for
    Java and mention that Java programs can take the form of applets,
    applications, servlets, midlets, etc. Again, a simple exercise that develops
    a Hello World program would be a nice capper to the course so that they can
    see that a simple application can be done easily in Java.

    But _IF_ your course is actually supposed to pretend to teach some
    appreciable amount of the Java language to people who are new to Java, or
    maybe to programming in general, I think it is time for a major reality
    check. You simply can't do that in 6 hours under any circumstances I can
    conceive. Java is too complex to teach any major chunk of it in 6 hours.
    Period. Now, you could possibly teach the basic statements, like 'if' and
    'while' and so forth, as well as the operators and the primitive datatypes
    in 6 hours but I doubt that would do students much good: your students would
    still need to have some concept of Objects and Classes to do much of
    anything with the statements and operators.

    Rhino
     
    Rhino, Dec 21, 2005
    #5
  6. pemo

    pemo Guest

    "Rhino" <> wrote in message
    news:l_fqf.1895$...
    >
    > "zero" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9733900C161EEzerothishi@195.130.132.70...
    >> "pemo" <> wrote in
    >> news:do9nsr$5im$:
    >>
    >>> I've just been told that I have to teach two three hour sessions on -
    >>> 'an intro to java' in early January. Looks like I'm faced with having
    >>> to work through Christmas, or find some friendly source for
    >>> 'inspiration'.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions most welcome!
    >>>
    >>> x-posted:comp.lang.java.advocacy; comp.lang.java.help;
    >>> comp.lang.java-programmer
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> A lot depends on your audience. Do they have a background in OOAD? Do
    >> they know other OO languages, or non-OO languages?
    >>
    >> Deitel & Associates, Inc. (www.deitel.com) has a lot of teacher's
    >> resources, including lecture slides, examples and student files. Sun's
    >> Java site (java.sun.com) has a lot of online tutorials, some of which can
    >> be downloaded for offline viewing. My suggestion would be to first think
    >> about what you need in respect of what your students already know, and
    >> then
    >> search for appropriate material online.
    >>

    > I agree with zero on this.
    >
    > Two 3-hour sessions on Java is not very much at all. A proper course to
    > teach Java thoroughly would probably run for a week at the very least,
    > probably several weeks, assuming the student had no previous programming
    > experience. You can't cover very much ground at all in six hours....
    >
    > I'm a very big believer in exercises to reinforce knowledge. I rarely
    > understand things until I've had a chance to apply them and I've found
    > that this applies to many other students as well. (I've spent years
    > earning the bulk of my income from teaching computer courses.) But with
    > only six hours at your disposal, I think you'll want to choose your
    > content very carefully and exercises are probably not going to be a top
    > priority.
    >
    > What to choose for your course really depends on what the purpose of the
    > course is.
    >
    > _IF_ the students are simply attending your course to get an overview of
    > Java and will _definitely_ have a much longer course afterwards covering
    > Java thoroughly, then you would probably be best to present basic OO and
    > Java concepts to give them a good foundation for the follow-on course.
    > Time permitting, you could even have a short exercise where they write,
    > compile and execute a Hello World program or something not much more
    > sophisticated.
    >
    > However, _IF_ your students are going to decide whether to take the
    > follow-on course based on your course, things get trickier. Then you
    > probably need to make an effort to "sell" the follow-on course with your
    > course. You'll need to excite them about Java and show them all the
    > magical things it can do without giving them a dishonest picture of the
    > language. (You don't want to tell them that it is the easiest language in
    > the world, that they will be able to write sophisticated, well-designed
    > programs the first day, or other such nonsense.) But you can highlight
    > Java's many excellent features, the concept of WORE (Write Once Run
    > Everywhere) [although you may want to warn them that some platform
    > differences will likely still have to be addressed], the wealth of slick
    > developer tools for Java, the greatly improved performance since the early
    > days of Java, and so forth. You can also demonstrate some of the better
    > programs and tools for Java and mention that Java programs can take the
    > form of applets, applications, servlets, midlets, etc. Again, a simple
    > exercise that develops a Hello World program would be a nice capper to the
    > course so that they can see that a simple application can be done easily
    > in Java.
    >
    > But _IF_ your course is actually supposed to pretend to teach some
    > appreciable amount of the Java language to people who are new to Java, or
    > maybe to programming in general, I think it is time for a major reality
    > check. You simply can't do that in 6 hours under any circumstances I can
    > conceive. Java is too complex to teach any major chunk of it in 6 hours.
    > Period. Now, you could possibly teach the basic statements, like 'if' and
    > 'while' and so forth, as well as the operators and the primitive datatypes
    > in 6 hours but I doubt that would do students much good: your students
    > would still need to have some concept of Objects and Classes to do much of
    > anything with the statements and operators.


    The course is a 'gap filler', and is intended to just cover the basics:
    language constructs and some OO.
     
    pemo, Dec 22, 2005
    #6
  7. pemo

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "pemo" <> wrote in message
    news:do9nsr$5im$...
    > I've just been told that I have to teach two three hour sessions on - 'an
    > intro to java' in early January. Looks like I'm faced with having to work
    > through Christmas, or find some friendly source for 'inspiration'.
    >
    > Any suggestions most welcome!
    >
    > x-posted:comp.lang.java.advocacy; comp.lang.java.help;
    > comp.lang.java-programmer


    I suggest you tell us who your target audience is (and I suggest you
    find out if you don't know).

    An given introductory course to java will differ significantly for these
    groups of people:

    * Children.
    * Adults.
    * People who have never "created" anything on a computer.
    * People who have done some simple HTML, but no actual programming.
    * People who have done some simple programming in Basic, VisualBasic, or
    other "easy" languages.
    * People who have significant experience in a language that is not Java-like
    (e.g. LISP, COBOL, Assembler, etc.)
    * People who have significant experience in a language which IS Java-like
    (e.g. C#)
    * People who WANT to learn.
    * People who are taking this course because they "have to".

    etc.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 22, 2005
    #7
  8. pemo

    Chris Smith Guest

    Oliver Wong <> wrote:
    > I suggest you tell us who your target audience is (and I suggest you
    > find out if you don't know).
    >
    > An given introductory course to java will differ significantly for these
    > groups of people:


    Good question. Another good one is this:

    What are you attempting to accomplish? If your company wants to teach
    someone how to program in Java, then it likely doesn't matter what you
    do, since you won't accomplish that in three hours; especially not in a
    "session", which implies teaching to a group instead of individual
    mentoring. There's a good reason that training companies generally
    offer four-day or one-week classes on that, and even then only deliver
    the basic information needed to get started.

    On the other hand, if your goal is to introduce someone to the idea
    behind Java, the difference between JavaME, SE, EE, etc. then this is
    achievable. But make sure your goals match those who gave you the
    assignment, and let them know early if they are living in a fantasy land
    and need to readjust their goals.

    --
    www.designacourse.com
    The Easiest Way To Train Anyone... Anywhere.

    Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
    MindIQ Corporation
     
    Chris Smith, Dec 22, 2005
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Mayank Prajapati

    MCSD Materials

    Mayank Prajapati, Jan 11, 2005, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    411
    Mayank Prajapati
    Jan 11, 2005
  2. Jarod

    What materials ?

    Jarod, Nov 18, 2005, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    387
    Kevin Spencer
    Nov 19, 2005
  3. RSH
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    307
    David Hogue
    May 22, 2006
  4. Suveetha
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    752
  5. ....@m
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    292
    ....@m
    Jan 24, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page