Create our own python source repository

Discussion in 'Python' started by qwweeeit@yahoo.it, Jun 7, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Hi all,
    beeing almost a newbie, I am trying to learn from experts.
    For that reason I am collecting examples of Python sources (and
    Pythonic way of programming...) on a CD, ready to be searched.
    By now, I extracted from web (using wget) all the examples of Cookbook
    Python (35 Mb!). After some polishing and merging I obtained 20 files
    (one for each Category), which sum up to 12 Mb).
    To this source repository, I want also add my own scripts. But since my
    programming habits are not very Pythonic, I should prefer to include
    more meaningful examples.
    In the web there is plenty of such material, but I need the advice of
    experts to address me in the right direction...
    Bye.
     
    , Jun 7, 2005
    #1
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  2. Rob Cowie Guest

    I'm not entirely sure what the point of your exercise is - if you have
    access to the net, ,why do you want to collate code examples? They are
    frequently updated in the cookbook so an offline repository would
    quickly become out of date.

    However.... you've aroused my interest in something related. We all
    know Python is significantly easier for novice programmers to grasp
    than, say, Java - I too am a newbie who started at uni with java and
    wished I hadn't.

    Tutorials are great, self paced learning is great, BUT, for the
    complete beginner a well structured, offline course with examples,
    exercises, tips etc. would be a brilliant resource. Python would fit
    the bill as a demonstration language to teach Object Orientation, flow
    control statements, other common constructs etc. A quick canvas of some
    IT teachers I know indicates support for such a thing - perhaps even in
    secondary shools (pre-uni).

    What does everyone think it would take to start such a project, and
    distribute it? or has it been done already?
     
    Rob Cowie, Jun 7, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Hi Rob,
    thank you for your reply. I am further commenting on your doubts ("I'm
    not entirely sure what the point of your exercise is") and on your
    proposal of a project for more structured tutorials.

    About the second item, I fully agree with you. I should be even more
    drastic: for a certain argument I'd prefer an application fully
    explained (also if not covering all the features) to a more general
    tutorial with only brief and unrelated code snippets.
    Unfortunately, that's not the way things are normally done, because it
    is much harder to build a useful application and fully comment it (also
    from the theoretical point of view, like, for example, OO or database
    management)

    As far as the 1st item is concerned, I know that Cookbook Python is
    frequently updated, but for my purposes also a "freezed" situation is
    OK, and "grepping" is much more useful than "googling" over the web.
    For that reason I want also add to the repository "my" examples of
    Python scripts, to build on already known tools.
    To give an example, the other day I wanted to use "writelines()" to
    save a list to a file. Having already used such a file method, but not
    remembering where and when, I was obliged to consult the Library
    Reference for the sintax and for the type of list instead of merely
    cutting and pasting from my code...
    Bye.
     
    , Jun 7, 2005
    #3
  4. datacide Guest

    Hello,

    I use MoinMoin (a python wiki) desktop edition to collect and sort code
    snippets and classes.
    It runs standalone (comes with its own webserver) and does the job just
    fine.

    regards
    dc
     
    datacide, Jun 8, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    Hi datacide,
    before, the good part...: thank you for your replay. Your suggestion
    has opened me a new worldl: an alternative method to get web
    resources.
    Now the bad part: your is an example of "guru's suggestion", that is a
    few words from which the poor newbye can't exctract much. It is much
    more useful is you give also some web directions to get the tool and
    install it (if it is not straightforwad...).
    Of course the top would be to give a short example of what you mean by
    "collect and sort code snippets and classes).
    My method is much ruder: to merge the various htmls and get rid of the
    spurious parts...
    (I am making the same mistake, that is ...few words, but I'm not a
    guru!).
    Bye.
     
    , Jun 21, 2005
    #5
  6. qwwee:
    > for a certain argument I'd prefer an application fully
    >explained (also if not covering all the features) to a more general
    >tutorial with only brief and unrelated code snippets.
    >Unfortunately, that's not the way things are normally done, because it
    >is much harder to build a useful application and fully comment it


    A part the Cookbook, I know of at least two Python books taking the
    approach you describe:

    1. Dive into Python (Pilgrim)
    2. Programming Python (Lutz)

    Dive into Python is free (and even translated in Italian on
    www.python.it, IIRC)

    Michele Simionato
     
    Michele Simionato, Jun 21, 2005
    #6
  7. Michele Simionato said unto the world upon 21/06/2005 07:58:
    > qwwee:
    >
    >>for a certain argument I'd prefer an application fully
    >>explained (also if not covering all the features) to a more general
    >>tutorial with only brief and unrelated code snippets.
    >>Unfortunately, that's not the way things are normally done, because it
    >>is much harder to build a useful application and fully comment it

    >
    >
    > A part the Cookbook, I know of at least two Python books taking the
    > approach you describe:
    >
    > 1. Dive into Python (Pilgrim)
    > 2. Programming Python (Lutz)
    >
    > Dive into Python is free (and even translated in Italian on
    > www.python.it, IIRC)
    >
    > Michele Simionato
    >


    Not free, but:

    Practical Python, published by the same press as the Pilgrim, steps
    through incremental approaches to large (by book standards)
    applications. From the author's site:

    "Hetland devotes the second half of the book to project development,
    taking great care to choose a series of ten increasingly complex
    applications that are of timely and wide-ranging interest to
    burgeoning and expert developers alike. Project focus includes
    automated document conversion, newsgroup administration, graphical PDF
    document generation, remote document maintenance, the creation of a
    peer-to-peer system with XML-RPC, database integration, and GUI and
    game development.
    "
    http://hetland.org/writing/practical-python/

    best,

    Brian vdB
     
    Brian van den Broek, Jun 21, 2005
    #7
  8. gene tani Guest

    Practical Python is quite a good book. And to re-iterate again, teh
    humongous tutorial list which has Hetland's Instant python among
    others:

    http://www.awaretek.com/tutorials.html

    Brian van den Broek wrote:
    > Michele Simionato said unto the world upon 21/06/2005 07:58:
    > > qwwee:
    > >
    > >>for a certain argument I'd prefer an application fully
    > >>explained (also if not covering all the features) to a more general
    > >>tutorial with only brief and unrelated code snippets.
    > >>Unfortunately, that's not the way things are normally done, because it
    > >>is much harder to build a useful application and fully comment it

    > >
    > >
    > > A part the Cookbook, I know of at least two Python books taking the
    > > approach you describe:
    > >
    > > 1. Dive into Python (Pilgrim)
    > > 2. Programming Python (Lutz)
    > >
    > > Dive into Python is free (and even translated in Italian on
    > > www.python.it, IIRC)
    > >
    > > Michele Simionato
    > >

    >
    > Not free, but:
    >
    > Practical Python, published by the same press as the Pilgrim, steps
    > through incremental approaches to large (by book standards)
    > applications. From the author's site:
    >
    > "Hetland devotes the second half of the book to project development,
    > taking great care to choose a series of ten increasingly complex
    > applications that are of timely and wide-ranging interest to
    > burgeoning and expert developers alike. Project focus includes
    > automated document conversion, newsgroup administration, graphical PDF
    > document generation, remote document maintenance, the creation of a
    > peer-to-peer system with XML-RPC, database integration, and GUI and
    > game development.
    > "
    > http://hetland.org/writing/practical-python/
    >
    > best,
    >
    > Brian vdB
     
    gene tani, Jun 21, 2005
    #8
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