Curses for win32 with VT100/ANSI support

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Daniele C., May 20, 2006.

  1. Daniele C.

    Daniele C. Guest

    As soon as my sourceforge.net project gets approved, I am going to
    build a ncurses port to win32 bindable to sockets, e.g. allowing
    VT100/ANSI terminals and the creation of simple terminal servers using
    the ncurses API for the UI. I plan to initially support only a subset
    of the ncurses lib, leaving the lib open to expansion/completion.

    Please stop me if I am going to reinvent the wheel, and tell me if
    there are any libraries of this kind.

    1. No, I don't want to use cygwin
    2. Yes, I know pdcurses, it is great and I plan to use it for normal
    ncurses consoles but I need a socket-bound vt100 terminal library...

    Thank you!

    --
    Daniele C.
    Daniele C., May 20, 2006
    #1
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  2. "Daniele C." <> writes:
    > As soon as my sourceforge.net project gets approved, I am going to
    > build a ncurses port to win32 bindable to sockets, e.g. allowing
    > VT100/ANSI terminals and the creation of simple terminal servers using
    > the ncurses API for the UI. I plan to initially support only a subset
    > of the ncurses lib, leaving the lib open to expansion/completion.
    >
    > Please stop me if I am going to reinvent the wheel, and tell me if
    > there are any libraries of this kind.


    Sorry, this is the wrong place to ask. Try a Windows programming
    newsgroup, possibly comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32. (Or a Google
    search.)

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
    Keith Thompson, May 20, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Daniele C.

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Keith Thompson <kst-
    > writes
    >"Daniele C." <> writes:
    >> As soon as my sourceforge.net project gets approved, I am going to
    >> build a ncurses port to win32 bindable to sockets, e.g. allowing
    >> VT100/ANSI terminals and the creation of simple terminal servers using
    >> the ncurses API for the UI. I plan to initially support only a subset
    >> of the ncurses lib, leaving the lib open to expansion/completion.
    >>
    >> Please stop me if I am going to reinvent the wheel, and tell me if
    >> there are any libraries of this kind.

    >
    >Sorry, this is the wrong place to ask. Try a Windows programming
    >newsgroup, possibly comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32. (Or a Google
    >search.)


    This has bugger all to do with windows. Curses is a portable screen
    handling system for terminal windows. I have used the same curses
    library on an Atari ST, Dos, Win9* (in a dos window) MAC and various
    unix. It is a portable system.

    This is precisely the place to talk about the majority of the code for a
    curses library. The only difference for the many dozens of terminal
    types are the escape sequences. These are usually held in a text file so
    you can swap terminal types easily.

    Very little of this will be windows or any other OS specific

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    Chris Hills, May 21, 2006
    #3
  4. Daniele C.

    Skarmander Guest

    Chris Hills wrote:
    > In article <>, Keith Thompson <kst-
    > > writes
    >> "Daniele C." <> writes:
    >>> As soon as my sourceforge.net project gets approved, I am going to
    >>> build a ncurses port to win32 bindable to sockets, e.g. allowing
    >>> VT100/ANSI terminals and the creation of simple terminal servers using
    >>> the ncurses API for the UI. I plan to initially support only a subset
    >>> of the ncurses lib, leaving the lib open to expansion/completion.
    >>>
    >>> Please stop me if I am going to reinvent the wheel, and tell me if
    >>> there are any libraries of this kind.

    >> Sorry, this is the wrong place to ask. Try a Windows programming
    >> newsgroup, possibly comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32. (Or a Google
    >> search.)

    >
    > This has bugger all to do with windows. Curses is a portable screen
    > handling system for terminal windows. I have used the same curses
    > library on an Atari ST, Dos, Win9* (in a dos window) MAC and various
    > unix. It is a portable system.
    >

    The OP is trying to *implement* a networked ncurses on a particular
    platform. This is going to involve OS or library-specific stuff, unless you
    believe in magic.

    > This is precisely the place to talk about the majority of the code for a
    > curses library. The only difference for the many dozens of terminal
    > types are the escape sequences. These are usually held in a text file so
    > you can swap terminal types easily.
    >
    > Very little of this will be windows or any other OS specific
    >

    Very little of this will be C specific too, and that's what this newsgroup
    is about. There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another matter.

    S.
    Skarmander, May 21, 2006
    #4
  5. Daniele C.

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <4470488c$0$31642$4all.nl>, Skarmander
    <> writes
    >Chris Hills wrote:
    >> In article <>, Keith Thompson <kst-
    >> > writes
    >>> "Daniele C." <> writes:
    >>>> As soon as my sourceforge.net project gets approved, I am going to
    >>>> build a ncurses port to win32 bindable to sockets, e.g. allowing
    >>>> VT100/ANSI terminals and the creation of simple terminal servers using
    >>>> the ncurses API for the UI. I plan to initially support only a subset
    >>>> of the ncurses lib, leaving the lib open to expansion/completion.
    >>>>
    >>>> Please stop me if I am going to reinvent the wheel, and tell me if
    >>>> there are any libraries of this kind.
    >>> Sorry, this is the wrong place to ask. Try a Windows programming
    >>> newsgroup, possibly comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32. (Or a Google
    >>> search.)

    >>
    >> This has bugger all to do with windows. Curses is a portable screen
    >> handling system for terminal windows. I have used the same curses
    >> library on an Atari ST, Dos, Win9* (in a dos window) MAC and various
    >> unix. It is a portable system.
    >>

    >The OP is trying to *implement* a networked ncurses on a particular
    >platform. This is going to involve OS or library-specific stuff, unless you
    >believe in magic.


    SO there will be some OS specific parts of the code. The majority will
    not be. Unless this NG is ONLY for pure portable ISO C99 code. As the NG
    is not for that he can post here.

    >> This is precisely the place to talk about the majority of the code for a
    >> curses library. The only difference for the many dozens of terminal
    >> types are the escape sequences. These are usually held in a text file so
    >> you can swap terminal types easily.
    >>
    >> Very little of this will be windows or any other OS specific
    >>

    >Very little of this will be C specific too, and that's what this newsgroup
    >is about.


    It's written in C which is what this NG is about.

    > There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    >questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another matter.


    Wrong. but you are entitled to your opinion.


    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    Chris Hills, May 21, 2006
    #5
  6. Chris Hills <> writes:
    > In article <>, Keith Thompson <kst-
    > > writes
    >>"Daniele C." <> writes:
    >>> As soon as my sourceforge.net project gets approved, I am going to
    >>> build a ncurses port to win32 bindable to sockets, e.g. allowing
    >>> VT100/ANSI terminals and the creation of simple terminal servers using
    >>> the ncurses API for the UI. I plan to initially support only a subset
    >>> of the ncurses lib, leaving the lib open to expansion/completion.
    >>>
    >>> Please stop me if I am going to reinvent the wheel, and tell me if
    >>> there are any libraries of this kind.

    >>
    >>Sorry, this is the wrong place to ask. Try a Windows programming
    >>newsgroup, possibly comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32. (Or a Google
    >>search.)

    >
    > This has bugger all to do with windows. Curses is a portable screen
    > handling system for terminal windows. I have used the same curses
    > library on an Atari ST, Dos, Win9* (in a dos window) MAC and various
    > unix. It is a portable system.
    >
    > This is precisely the place to talk about the majority of the code for a
    > curses library. The only difference for the many dozens of terminal
    > types are the escape sequences. These are usually held in a text file so
    > you can swap terminal types easily.
    >
    > Very little of this will be windows or any other OS specific


    He wasn't asking about the code. He wasn't asking how to implement
    anything. He was asking whether anyone else had already implemented
    such a library *for win32*. That's not a C question.

    The Linux kernel is written in C; that doesn't make a question about
    porting it to some specific platform topical here. Ditto for any of
    the thousands of other software packages implemented in C.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
    Keith Thompson, May 21, 2006
    #6
  7. Daniele C.

    Malcolm Guest

    "Chris Hills" <> wrote
    > In article Skarmander <> writes
    >>Chris Hills wrote:
    >>> In article <>, Keith Thompson <kst-
    >>> > writes
    >>>> "Daniele C." <> writes:
    >>>>> As soon as my sourceforge.net project gets approved, I am going to
    >>>>> build a ncurses port to win32 bindable to sockets, e.g. allowing
    >>>>> VT100/ANSI terminals and the creation of simple terminal servers using
    >>>>> the ncurses API for the UI. I plan to initially support only a subset
    >>>>> of the ncurses lib, leaving the lib open to expansion/completion.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Please stop me if I am going to reinvent the wheel, and tell me if
    >>>>> there are any libraries of this kind.
    >>>> Sorry, this is the wrong place to ask. Try a Windows programming
    >>>> newsgroup, possibly comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32. (Or a Google
    >>>> search.)
    >>>
    >>> This has bugger all to do with windows. Curses is a portable screen
    >>> handling system for terminal windows. I have used the same curses
    >>> library on an Atari ST, Dos, Win9* (in a dos window) MAC and various
    >>> unix. It is a portable system.
    >>>

    >>The OP is trying to *implement* a networked ncurses on a particular
    >>platform. This is going to involve OS or library-specific stuff, unless
    >>you
    >>believe in magic.

    >
    > SO there will be some OS specific parts of the code. The majority will
    > not be. Unless this NG is ONLY for pure portable ISO C99 code. As the NG
    > is not for that he can post here.
    >

    And if I write a knitting program, probably the stitch database and most of
    the logic will be implemented in portable ANSI C, with only a minor
    Windows-specific user interface.
    Does that make the knitting / crotchet debate topical here?
    >
    > It's written in C which is what this NG is about.
    >

    The difference is that a curses library is something that programmers use.
    There is a case for including it in the standard library, though in fact the
    ANSI library has no such functions.
    >
    >> There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    >>questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another
    >>matter.

    >
    > Wrong. but you are entitled to your opinion.
    >

    We could allow it, but it would be expanding the scope of the group. I've no
    use for a curses system, for instance. If I need a non-stream user interface
    I'll use a windowing library, or html forms, or Java.
    --
    Buy my book 12 Common Atheist Arguments (refuted)
    $1.25 download or $7.20 paper, available www.lulu.com/bgy1mm
    Malcolm, May 21, 2006
    #7
  8. Daniele C.

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Malcolm
    <> writes
    >"Chris Hills" <> wrote
    >> In article Skarmander <> writes
    >>>Chris Hills wrote:

    >>
    >>> There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    >>>questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another
    >>>matter.

    >>
    >> Wrong. but you are entitled to your opinion.
    >>

    >We could allow it,


    You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    to the charter.

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    Chris Hills, May 22, 2006
    #8
  9. Chris Hills <> writes:
    > In article <>, Malcolm
    > <> writes
    >>"Chris Hills" <> wrote
    >>> In article Skarmander <> writes
    >>>>Chris Hills wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    >>>>questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another
    >>>>matter.
    >>>
    >>> Wrong. but you are entitled to your opinion.
    >>>

    >>We could allow it,

    >
    > You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    > to the charter.


    We certainly do have a say in the matter; we just don't have an
    effective enforcement mechanism.

    It seems clear to me that any answer to the OP's actual question would
    not be based on a knowledge of the C programming language.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
    Keith Thompson, May 22, 2006
    #9
  10. Daniele C.

    Jordan Abel Guest

    On 2006-05-22, Keith Thompson <> wrote:
    > Chris Hills <> writes:
    >> In article <>, Malcolm
    >> <> writes
    >>>"Chris Hills" <> wrote
    >>>> In article Skarmander <> writes
    >>>>>Chris Hills wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    >>>>>questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another
    >>>>>matter.
    >>>>
    >>>> Wrong. but you are entitled to your opinion.
    >>>>
    >>>We could allow it,

    >>
    >> You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    >> to the charter.

    >
    > We certainly do have a say in the matter; we just don't have an
    > effective enforcement mechanism.


    The problem is that it's not clear what authority your opinion on what
    was the pre-existing "scope of the group" which "allowing" this would be
    "expanding" is based on.

    > It seems clear to me that any answer to the OP's actual question would
    > not be based on a knowledge of the C programming language.
    Jordan Abel, May 22, 2006
    #10
  11. On 2006-05-21, Malcolm <> wrote:
    > The difference is that a curses library is something that programmers use.
    > There is a case for including it in the standard library, though in fact the
    > ANSI library has no such functions.


    Not a lot of systems have a screen. I've programmed routers with which I
    communicated with entirely by FTPing log files around. Curses would just
    be an unneccessary pain for compiler writers.

    The only addition to the library that I think is feasable would be some
    decent networking functions; all systems have networks, with the exception
    of embedded systems, which already have their special small library.

    --
    Andrew Poelstra < http://www.wpsoftware.net/blog >
    To email me, use "apoelstra" at the above address.
    Get your game faces on, because this is not a game.
    Andrew Poelstra, May 22, 2006
    #11
  12. Daniele C.

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Keith Thompson <kst-
    > writes
    >Chris Hills <> writes:
    >> In article <>, Malcolm
    >> <> writes
    >>>"Chris Hills" <> wrote
    >>>> In article Skarmander <> writes
    >>>>>Chris Hills wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    >>>>>questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another
    >>>>>matter.
    >>>>
    >>>> Wrong. but you are entitled to your opinion.
    >>>>
    >>>We could allow it,

    >>
    >> You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    >> to the charter.

    >
    >We certainly do have a say in the matter; we just don't have an
    >effective enforcement mechanism.


    TO be more accurate *I* have a say in the matter but not an effective
    enforcement system to correct you..... :)



    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    Chris Hills, May 22, 2006
    #12
  13. Daniele C.

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Andrew
    Poelstra <> writes
    >On 2006-05-21, Malcolm <> wrote:
    >> The difference is that a curses library is something that programmers use.
    >> There is a case for including it in the standard library, though in fact the
    >> ANSI library has no such functions.

    >
    >Not a lot of systems have a screen. I've programmed routers with which I
    >communicated with entirely by FTPing log files around.


    This is incorrect. In fact this is one place where you probably might
    need curses.

    > Curses would just
    >be an unneccessary pain for compiler writers.


    Why? Compiler writers write compilers not libraries.
    Library writers write libraries.

    >The only addition to the library that I think is feasable would be some
    >decent networking functions;


    Not really there are far to many types of network to do a standard
    network library.

    >all systems have networks,


    Completely untrue by a VERY long way.

    > with the exception
    >of embedded systems,


    Lots of embedded systems have networks of one sort or another. Profi,
    CAN and LIN for starters.

    >which already have their special small library.


    Complete bollox.

    You seem to have a very limited knowledge of things.


    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    Chris Hills, May 22, 2006
    #13
  14. In article <>,
    Chris Hills <> wrote:
    >In article <>, Malcolm
    ><> writes


    >>We could allow it,


    >You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    >to the charter.


    What charter? There is no hierarchy charter for comp or comp.lang
    and comp.lang.c was created without reference to a charter.
    --
    There are some ideas so wrong that only a very intelligent person
    could believe in them. -- George Orwell
    Walter Roberson, May 22, 2006
    #14
  15. Chris Hills <> writes:
    > In article <>, Keith Thompson <kst-
    > > writes
    >>Chris Hills <> writes:
    >>> In article <>, Malcolm
    >>> <> writes
    >>>>"Chris Hills" <> wrote
    >>>>> In article Skarmander <> writes
    >>>>>>Chris Hills wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> There are no questions about the C language here. If there are
    >>>>>>questions about what's portable and what's not, that would be another
    >>>>>>matter.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Wrong. but you are entitled to your opinion.
    >>>>>
    >>>>We could allow it,
    >>>
    >>> You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    >>> to the charter.

    >>
    >>We certainly do have a say in the matter; we just don't have an
    >>effective enforcement mechanism.

    >
    > TO be more accurate *I* have a say in the matter but not an effective
    > enforcement system to correct you..... :)


    I fail to see how that's more (or less) accurate that what I wrote.

    The original question was about whether anyone had implemented a
    certain kind of curses/ncurses library for win32 (something to do with
    sockets; I don't remember the details). The OP was about to start
    work on such a project, and wanted to avoid re-inventing the wheel.

    Chris, can you explain just how such a question has anything to do
    with the C programming language? I know that ncurses happens to be
    implemented in C, but the OP wasn't asking about how to implement it.

    I see absolutely nothing in the original question such that a
    knowledge of the C programming language would be helpful in providing
    an answer.

    Why do you continue to insist that the question was topical? That's a
    serious question.

    (To be clear, I'm not angry at the OP for asking an off-topic
    question; mistakes happen.)

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
    Keith Thompson, May 22, 2006
    #15
  16. On 2006-05-22, Chris Hills <> wrote:
    > In article <>, Andrew
    > Poelstra <> writes
    >>On 2006-05-21, Malcolm <> wrote:
    >>> The difference is that a curses library is something that programmers use.
    >>> There is a case for including it in the standard library, though in fact the
    >>> ANSI library has no such functions.

    >>
    >>Not a lot of systems have a screen. I've programmed routers with which I
    >>communicated with entirely by FTPing log files around.

    >
    > This is incorrect. In fact this is one place where you probably might
    > need curses.
    >

    curses is a screen display, correct? So, unless I'm telnetting or
    SSHing onto a system without a screen, curses is useless.

    >> Curses would just
    >>be an unneccessary pain for compiler writers.

    >
    > Why? Compiler writers write compilers not libraries.
    > Library writers write libraries.
    >

    I stand corrected.

    >>The only addition to the library that I think is feasable would be some
    >>decent networking functions;

    >
    > Not really there are far to many types of network to do a standard
    > network library.
    >
    >>all systems have networks,

    >
    > Completely untrue by a VERY long way.

    Not too far off; a system needs to communicate with the outside world
    in almost all cases, and since many systems lack a screen, having some
    sort of network would be a logical choice.

    >> with the exception
    >>of embedded systems,

    >
    > Lots of embedded systems have networks of one sort or another. Profi,
    > CAN and LIN for starters.
    >

    I should have said *some* embedded systems, which I thought was implied
    by not stating *all* embedded systems.

    >>which already have their special small library.

    >
    > Complete bollox.
    >

    No, the C Standard specifies that small systems with limited space may
    use a small subset of the standard library.

    > You seem to have a very limited knowledge of things.
    >

    That is true for everyone, no? ;-)

    --
    Andrew Poelstra < http://www.wpsoftware.net/blog >
    To email me, use "apoelstra" at the above address.
    Get your game faces on, because this is not a game.
    Andrew Poelstra, May 22, 2006
    #16
  17. In article <>,
    Andrew Poelstra <> wrote:
    >On 2006-05-22, Chris Hills <> wrote:
    >> In article <>, Andrew
    >> Poelstra <> writes


    >>>all systems have networks,


    >> Completely untrue by a VERY long way.


    >Not too far off; a system needs to communicate with the outside world
    >in almost all cases, and since many systems lack a screen, having some
    >sort of network would be a logical choice.


    Input:

    Keyboards (for typing), keyboards (musical type), touch-screen,
    stylis, magnetic card, RFID chip, camera... even punch cards still
    (e.g., some fare collection systems)

    Output:

    CRT, LCD displays, LCD screens, LED displays, plasma, printers
    (inkjet, thermal, laser, photo), rewrite magnetic card, speakers,
    CD/DVD writer...

    Bidirectional:

    Serial ports, parallel ports, infrared (e.g., PalmPilot), CD/DVD RW,
    USB, USB memory stick, radio...


    Consider for example cheap programmable calculators. Are they
    "embedded" ? It could be so argued, but if they are programmable then
    the distinction between embedded and not becomes blurred.
    --
    Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new? It hath
    been already of old time, which was before us. -- Ecclesiastes
    Walter Roberson, May 23, 2006
    #17
  18. -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) writes:
    > In article <>,
    > Chris Hills <> wrote:
    >>In article <>, Malcolm
    >><> writes

    >
    >>>We could allow it,

    >
    >>You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    >>to the charter.

    >
    > What charter? There is no hierarchy charter for comp or comp.lang
    > and comp.lang.c was created without reference to a charter.


    He knows that. I'm sure that was his point.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
    Keith Thompson, May 23, 2006
    #18
  19. Daniele C.

    Jordan Abel Guest

    On 2006-05-23, Keith Thompson <> wrote:
    > -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) writes:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Chris Hills <> wrote:
    >>>In article <>, Malcolm
    >>><> writes

    >>
    >>>>We could allow it,

    >>
    >>>You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    >>>to the charter.

    >>
    >> What charter? There is no hierarchy charter for comp or comp.lang
    >> and comp.lang.c was created without reference to a charter.

    >
    > He knows that. I'm sure that was his point.


    It's never been clear to me why it requires more of a consensus to
    change this "policy" than it apparently did to create it in the first
    place.
    Jordan Abel, May 23, 2006
    #19
  20. Jordan Abel <> writes:
    > On 2006-05-23, Keith Thompson <> wrote:
    >> -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) writes:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Chris Hills <> wrote:
    >>>>In article <>, Malcolm
    >>>><> writes
    >>>
    >>>>>We could allow it,
    >>>
    >>>>You can not dis-allow it. You can have no say in the matter. I refer you
    >>>>to the charter.
    >>>
    >>> What charter? There is no hierarchy charter for comp or comp.lang
    >>> and comp.lang.c was created without reference to a charter.

    >>
    >> He knows that. I'm sure that was his point.

    >
    > It's never been clear to me why it requires more of a consensus to
    > change this "policy" than it apparently did to create it in the first
    > place.


    I'm not sure what you mean. I don't know what would be required to
    change the current de facto policy, but I haven't seen any consensus
    to change it.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
    Keith Thompson, May 23, 2006
    #20
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