CX-Post: hello world

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Tim Judd, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. Tim Judd

    Tim Judd Guest

    I must not be grasping anything here.

    Just a simple application, as follows (as any first-program is...)

    ----
    #include <iostream.h>

    int main() {
    cout <<"hello world";
    return 0;
    }
    ----

    never compiles! Tried it on FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Windows (under Visual C++ for
    Console App), OS X developer tools. THEY ALL complain!
    pretty much the same reason too!

    /tmp/ccJ31810.o: In function `main':
    /tmp/ccJ31810.o(.text+0xf): undefined reference to `cout'
    /tmp/ccJ31810.o(.text+0x14): undefined reference to
    `ostream::eek:perator<<(char const *)'
    collect2: ld returned 1 exit status


    But... I thought the #include was supposed to bring in the definitions from
    that file before checking the code for execution problems.

    I don't understand why it won't work, no matter the tutorials I see, books I
    read, articles I read! Can someone point me in the right direction, a
    utterly clueless newbie! (yes, I called myself that, so you can call me
    that ONCE, too!)

    Appreciate it in advance, email is spam-blocked, remove the single period
    PRIOR to the @ sign to reply by mail.

    --Tim
     
    Tim Judd, Apr 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. Tim Judd

    Kelvin@!!! Guest

    well, you forgot something in ur code..
    first C++ standard encourages you to use
    #include <iostream>
    and cout should really be written as std::cout in your case

    if you dont want to write std::cout through out your whole program
    you should put
    using namespace std;
    before your main() function
    so that you can just write cout in the following lines

    and i also have a question here

    can i put the "using namespace bla" in the middle of my code?
    or can i make it effective in only a certain block of code??
    thank you very much
    --
    { Kelvin@!!! }
    "Tim Judd" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I must not be grasping anything here.
    >
    > Just a simple application, as follows (as any first-program is...)
    >
    > ----
    > #include <iostream.h>
    >
    > int main() {
    > cout <<"hello world";
    > return 0;
    > }
    > ----
    >
    > never compiles! Tried it on FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Windows (under Visual C++

    for
    > Console App), OS X developer tools. THEY ALL complain!
    > pretty much the same reason too!
    >
    > /tmp/ccJ31810.o: In function `main':
    > /tmp/ccJ31810.o(.text+0xf): undefined reference to `cout'
    > /tmp/ccJ31810.o(.text+0x14): undefined reference to
    > `ostream::eek:perator<<(char const *)'
    > collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
    >
    >
    > But... I thought the #include was supposed to bring in the definitions

    from
    > that file before checking the code for execution problems.
    >
    > I don't understand why it won't work, no matter the tutorials I see, books

    I
    > read, articles I read! Can someone point me in the right direction, a
    > utterly clueless newbie! (yes, I called myself that, so you can call me
    > that ONCE, too!)
    >
    > Appreciate it in advance, email is spam-blocked, remove the single period
    > PRIOR to the @ sign to reply by mail.
    >
    > --Tim
     
    Kelvin@!!!, Apr 14, 2004
    #2
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  3. Tim Judd

    JaSeong Ju Guest

    Do this instead:

    #include <iostream>


    using namespace std;


    int main() {
    cout << "hello world" << endl;
    return 0;
    }



    iostream.h is deprecated, the standard C++ is to use
    iostream without .h

    the undefined reference to cout appeared because
    the "using namespace std" was not there.

    see http://www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html
     
    JaSeong Ju, Apr 14, 2004
    #3
  4. Tim Judd

    JaSeong Ju Guest

    Do this instead:

    #include <iostream>


    using namespace std;


    int main() {
    cout << "hello world" << endl;
    return 0;
    }



    iostream.h is deprecated, the standard C++ is to use
    iostream without .h

    the undefined reference to cout appeared because
    you had iostream.h instead of iostream.

    see http://www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html
     
    JaSeong Ju, Apr 14, 2004
    #4
  5. Tim Judd

    Buster Guest

    Re: CX-Post: hello world [OT in comp.lang.c, followup set]

    Tim Judd wrote:
    > I must not be grasping anything here.
    >
    > Just a simple application, as follows (as any first-program is...)
    >
    > ----
    > #include <iostream.h>
    >
    > int main() {
    > cout <<"hello world";
    > return 0;
    > }


    There shouldn't be a link error. Did you use
    "gcc" instead of "g++" for linking?

    --
    Regards,
    Buster.
     
    Buster, Apr 14, 2004
    #5
  6. Sorry about the OT c.l.c (was: CX-Post: hello world)

    Tim Judd wrote:
    [A bunch of C++ stuff.]

    Sorry about this, guys. I've asked the poster and repliers (in c.l.c++)
    to be more careful in the future. Thought I should let you know in the
    interest of saving you folks the trouble.

    -Kevin
    --
    My email address is valid, but changes periodically.
    To contact me please use the address from a recent posting.
     
    Kevin Goodsell, Apr 14, 2004
    #6
  7. Tim Judd wrote:

    > I must not be grasping anything here.
    >
    > Just a simple application, as follows (as any first-program is...)
    >
    > ----
    > #include <iostream.h>
    >
    > int main() {
    > cout <<"hello world";
    > return 0;
    > }
    > ----
    >
    > never compiles!


    If you are going to post to comp.lang.c, post C. If you want to use
    C++, post to comp.lang.c++. For one of the two newsgroups you posted
    to, there is no <iostream.h> (or <iostream>) header, there is no
    predefined variable cout (or std::cout), and the symbol "<<" is always,
    other than in data or comments, a left shift operator. If the line
    containing 'cout' is intended to output the text "hello world", then the
    behavior of this program would, as well be undefined, since the last
    line of output does not end with an end-of-line '\n'.

    Here is your code, corrected for comp.lang.c:

    #include <stdio.h>
    int main(void)
    {
    puts("Hello world");
    return 0;
    }

    Follow-ups set to comp.lang.c++, since that where your question belongs.
     
    Martin Ambuhl, Apr 14, 2004
    #7
  8. Tim Judd

    Dan Pop Guest

    In <> Tim Judd <> writes:

    >I must not be grasping anything here.


    Most likely, since you appear to be a patent idiot. Otherwise, you'd have
    never crossposted your question to comp.lang.c.

    Dan
    --
    Dan Pop
    DESY Zeuthen, RZ group
    Email:
     
    Dan Pop, Apr 14, 2004
    #8
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