Dev c++ bold convention

Discussion in 'C++' started by pauldepstein@att.net, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Could anyone explain the rule the Dev C++ compiler uses for deciding
    whether to convert a display of a word to bold font?

    A first attempt at an answer could be "Words are displayed in bold when
    they have an assigned meaning in c++".

    However, this answer doesn't quite work -- "main" does not get
    converted automatically to bold, and nor do words for classes of
    streams such as "iostream" for example. Surely, such words do have
    assigned meanings.

    Thank you.

    Paul Epstein
    , Oct 17, 2005
    #1
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  2. mlimber Guest

    wrote:
    > Could anyone explain the rule the Dev C++ compiler uses for deciding
    > whether to convert a display of a word to bold font?
    >
    > A first attempt at an answer could be "Words are displayed in bold when
    > they have an assigned meaning in c++".
    >
    > However, this answer doesn't quite work -- "main" does not get
    > converted automatically to bold, and nor do words for classes of
    > streams such as "iostream" for example. Surely, such words do have
    > assigned meanings.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Paul Epstein


    This question, which is about a specific IDE, is off-topic in this
    newsgroup, which is concerned with C++ language issues. Try in a
    Dev-C++-specific newsgroup. See also this FAQ:

    http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite/how-to-post.html#faq-5.9

    Cheers! --M

    PS, I suspect only *reserved* words in C++ are highlighted. Functions
    and parts of the standard library (e.g., main, printf, cout) don't
    qualify.
    mlimber, Oct 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Well, the "PS" part of your answer leads to the c++ distinction between
    reserved and non-reserved words. And it also points out that some
    words which have distinct meanings like "main" etc. are nevertheless
    not reserved.

    The above two facts are facts about "the c++ language" however narrowly
    you define the phrase.

    By analogy, suppose someone says "I didn't understand ... in ...book on
    c++". Are you then going to attack that person because this newsgroup
    is only about the c++ language and not about c++ books?

    Provided that the newsgroup allows elementary questions [my question
    was certainly elementary], it is 100% on topic, and you are wrong to
    criticise me for my posting.

    However, if beginner questions are not allowed here, then, fair enough,
    mea culpa, I stand corrected.

    Paul Epstein
    , Oct 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Mike Wahler Guest

    Re: [OT] Dev c++ bold convention

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Could anyone explain the rule the Dev C++ compiler


    It's not the compiler doing that, but your editor.
    Not the same thing.

    > uses for deciding
    > whether to convert a display of a word to bold font?
    >
    > A first attempt at an answer could be "Words are displayed in bold when
    > they have an assigned meaning in c++".


    I think that's pretty much the answer. But note that
    function names (including those from the standard library)
    are not really considered part of the language 'proper',
    as are keywords such as 'if' and 'for'.

    >
    > However, this answer doesn't quite work -- "main" does not get
    > converted automatically to bold, and nor do words for classes of
    > streams such as "iostream" for example.


    I presume you mean standard header names. The names themselves
    are not part of the language, but part of the standard library.
    But I suspect the keyword '#include' is somehow 'highlighted',
    isn't it?

    > Surely, such words do have
    > assigned meanings.


    Yes, but not by the language.

    Some code editors and IDE's offer a facility where you can
    add your own list of 'special' words and assign graphical
    characteristics (e.g. 'bold' or color) to them. I don't
    know if this is the case with yours. However there are
    many 'syntax highlighting' editors available, both free and
    commercial. Try a web search.

    For future reference, note that issues like this are not
    topical for comp.lang.c++, which is only for discussion
    of the language itself, and not about specific tools such
    as compilers or editors. This is why I've modified your
    subject line with [OT].

    Purpose of comp.lang.c++ :
    http://www.slack.net/~shiva/welcome.txt

    -Mike
    Mike Wahler, Oct 17, 2005
    #4
  5. Mike Wahler Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Well, the "PS" part of your answer leads to the c++ distinction between
    > reserved and non-reserved words. And it also points out that some
    > words which have distinct meanings like "main" etc. are nevertheless
    > not reserved.
    >
    > The above two facts are facts about "the c++ language" however narrowly
    > you define the phrase.
    >
    > By analogy, suppose someone says "I didn't understand ... in ...book on
    > c++". Are you then going to attack that person because this newsgroup
    > is only about the c++ language and not about c++ books?
    >
    > Provided that the newsgroup allows elementary questions [my question
    > was certainly elementary], it is 100% on topic, and you are wrong to
    > criticise me for my posting.


    I would admit that a certain 'essence' of your query might
    be considered topical (i.e. about the C++ language), but
    part of it is not (the operation of your editor).

    The part which is topical could be restated: "what comprises
    a keyword or 'reserved' word in C++?" My answer is:

    "Keywords" are those words 'built in' to the language, for which
    no other 'outside' information is required for a translator
    (a.k.a. 'compiler') to discern their meaning. Some examples are
    'if', 'for', 'do', 'break'. The source of an exhaustive list
    of these words would be a good C++ text, or of course the ISO
    standard defining the language (ISO 14882).

    "Reserved" words (or more formally, 'names' and names composed
    in a specified way of particular characters) include keywords,
    but also include entities such as standard library names and
    names reserved to an implementation, such as those beginnning
    with two underscores (__).

    See my other posting in this thread for a suggestion.


    >
    > However, if beginner questions are not allowed here,


    Questions resulting from any level of knowledge and skill are
    most welcome here, however they must be topical. My other
    reply to your question I marked [OT], but in retrospect, perhaps
    it should have been 'partly OT'. :)


    > then, fair enough,
    > mea culpa, I stand corrected.


    I hope I've cleared things up at least a bit.

    -Mike
    Mike Wahler, Oct 17, 2005
    #5
  6. Guest

    Thank you for your very detailed and useful information. I do
    appreciate that.

    However, I still maintain that I was 100% on topic. I'll show you why.

    Suppose I said "My Dev C++ editor makes the words int, float, do
    become bold. However, it doesn't do that with other words such as main
    or iostream. Can you explain the essential conceptual difference
    between the words in the above list which are made bold, and the words
    which aren't?"

    Since my query is now a request for explaining the difference between
    two sets of c++ words, it is, from an absolutely narrow and pure
    perspective, a c++ language question. This is because, in the above
    quote, the fact that I spotted the difference in a dev c++ context is
    purely an introduction to the real c++ question.

    So I've proved that my new modified quotation is definitely on topic.

    However, the above modified quotation is an extremely close paraphrase
    of the posting that was unfairly attacked. (It was mlimber who was
    unfair. I have no problem at all with Mike Wahler. In fact you've
    been extremely generous and helpful.)

    So, since the new modified quotation is on topic, my original posting
    is also on topic.

    I couldn't possibly have talked about "keywords" and "reserved words"
    in my original posting (as you suggest) because I didn't know those two
    phrases. If I was familiar with the concept, "reserved word", I would
    have googled it and found out that way.

    Paul Epstein
    , Oct 17, 2005
    #6
  7. mlimber Guest

    wrote:
    > Well, the "PS" part of your answer leads to the c++ distinction between
    > reserved and non-reserved words. And it also points out that some
    > words which have distinct meanings like "main" etc. are nevertheless
    > not reserved.
    >
    > The above two facts are facts about "the c++ language" however narrowly
    > you define the phrase.
    >
    > By analogy, suppose someone says "I didn't understand ... in ...book on
    > c++". Are you then going to attack that person because this newsgroup
    > is only about the c++ language and not about c++ books?


    I humbly apologize if you took my response as an "attack." It was not
    intended as such, and I hope you'll take it in the spirit in which it
    was meant.

    > Provided that the newsgroup allows elementary questions [my question
    > was certainly elementary], it is 100% on topic, and you are wrong to
    > criticise me for my posting.
    >
    > However, if beginner questions are not allowed here, then, fair enough,
    > mea culpa, I stand corrected.


    Beginner questions are always welcome, though they must be on topic.
    The FAQ that I cited defines what is on topic here:

    "Only post to comp.lang.c++ if your question is about the C++ language
    itself. For example, C++ code design, syntax, style, rules, bugs, etc.
    Ultimately this means your question must be answerable by looking into
    the C++ language definition as determined by the ISO/ANSI C++ Standard
    document, and by planned extensions and adjustments. Operating-specific
    questions (e.g., about Windows NT / 95 / 3.x, UNIX, etc.) should go to
    an operating-system-specific newsgroup (see below), not to
    comp.lang.c++."

    As I interpreted it, your post was primarily concerned with an
    environmental feature -- namely, the color syntax highlighting of your
    particular IDE -- and that is off-topic here as I understand the FAQ
    because syntax highlighting is most often a user configurable feature.
    Of course there's some gray area, and I think my /post scriptum/
    addressed that.

    Cheers! --M
    mlimber, Oct 17, 2005
    #7
  8. Mike Wahler Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thank you for your very detailed and useful information. I do
    > appreciate that.
    >
    > However, I still maintain that I was 100% on topic. I'll show you why.
    >
    > Suppose I said "My Dev C++ editor makes the words int, float, do
    > become bold. However, it doesn't do that with other words such as main
    > or iostream. Can you explain the essential conceptual difference
    > between the words in the above list which are made bold, and the words
    > which aren't?"
    >
    > Since my query is now a request for explaining the difference between
    > two sets of c++ words, it is, from an absolutely narrow and pure
    > perspective, a c++ language question. This is because, in the above
    > quote, the fact that I spotted the difference in a dev c++ context is
    > purely an introduction to the real c++ question.
    >
    > So I've proved that my new modified quotation is definitely on topic.
    >
    > However, the above modified quotation is an extremely close paraphrase
    > of the posting that was unfairly attacked. (It was mlimber who was
    > unfair. I have no problem at all with Mike Wahler. In fact you've
    > been extremely generous and helpful.)
    >
    > So, since the new modified quotation is on topic, my original posting
    > is also on topic.
    >
    > I couldn't possibly have talked about "keywords" and "reserved words"
    > in my original posting (as you suggest) because I didn't know those two
    > phrases. If I was familiar with the concept, "reserved word", I would
    > have googled it and found out that way.


    I respectfully suggest that you become less obsessed with
    'being right'. :) I believe you've got your answer, and
    despite your disagreement with 'mlimber', I doubt you're
    bleeding or sporting any bruises (except perhaps to your
    ego :))

    Let's move on, OK? :)

    -Mike

    P.S. While I suppose it's a good thing that your editor did
    cause you to ask a language question, I'll warn you not to
    use such (or a compiler for that matter) as the source of
    any definitive answers about the language. Not all of these
    tools get everything right every time.
    Mike Wahler, Oct 17, 2005
    #8
  9. Kai-Uwe Bux Guest

    wrote:

    > Thank you for your very detailed and useful information. I do
    > appreciate that.
    >
    > However, I still maintain that I was 100% on topic. I'll show you why.
    >
    > Suppose I said "My Dev C++ editor makes the words int, float, do
    > become bold. However, it doesn't do that with other words such as main
    > or iostream. Can you explain the essential conceptual difference
    > between the words in the above list which are made bold, and the words
    > which aren't?"
    >
    > Since my query is now a request for explaining the difference between
    > two sets of c++ words, it is, from an absolutely narrow and pure
    > perspective, a c++ language question. This is because, in the above
    > quote, the fact that I spotted the difference in a dev c++ context is
    > purely an introduction to the real c++ question.


    Yes.

    > So I've proved that my new modified quotation is definitely on topic.


    Correct.

    > However, the above modified quotation is an extremely close paraphrase
    > of the posting that was unfairly attacked.


    Not so. Your original posting started with this sentence setting the topic:

    || > Could anyone explain the rule the Dev C++ compiler uses for deciding
    || > whether to convert a display of a word to bold font?

    And then you provided some examples. However, from the original wording it
    is pretty clear that your question is about the behavior of Dev C++; and to
    answer your original question one would need to know Dev C++.


    > (It was mlimber who was unfair. I have no problem at all with Mike
    > Wahler. In fact you've been extremely generous and helpful.)
    >
    > So, since the new modified quotation is on topic, my original posting
    > is also on topic.


    That does not follow. All that follows is that you could have posted
    something topical instead of your original posting.

    [snip]


    Best

    Kai-Uwe Bux
    Kai-Uwe Bux, Oct 17, 2005
    #9
  10. mlimber Guest

    mlimber wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > Well, the "PS" part of your answer leads to the c++ distinction between
    > > reserved and non-reserved words. And it also points out that some
    > > words which have distinct meanings like "main" etc. are nevertheless
    > > not reserved.
    > >
    > > The above two facts are facts about "the c++ language" however narrowly
    > > you define the phrase.
    > >
    > > By analogy, suppose someone says "I didn't understand ... in ...book on
    > > c++". Are you then going to attack that person because this newsgroup
    > > is only about the c++ language and not about c++ books?

    >
    > I humbly apologize if you took my response as an "attack." It was not
    > intended as such, and I hope you'll take it in the spirit in which it
    > was meant.
    >
    > > Provided that the newsgroup allows elementary questions [my question
    > > was certainly elementary], it is 100% on topic, and you are wrong to
    > > criticise me for my posting.
    > >
    > > However, if beginner questions are not allowed here, then, fair enough,
    > > mea culpa, I stand corrected.

    >
    > Beginner questions are always welcome, though they must be on topic.
    > The FAQ that I cited defines what is on topic here:
    >
    > "Only post to comp.lang.c++ if your question is about the C++ language
    > itself. For example, C++ code design, syntax, style, rules, bugs, etc.
    > Ultimately this means your question must be answerable by looking into
    > the C++ language definition as determined by the ISO/ANSI C++ Standard
    > document, and by planned extensions and adjustments. Operating-specific
    > questions (e.g., about Windows NT / 95 / 3.x, UNIX, etc.) should go to
    > an operating-system-specific newsgroup (see below), not to
    > comp.lang.c++."
    >
    > As I interpreted it, your post was primarily concerned with an
    > environmental feature -- namely, the color syntax highlighting of your
    > particular IDE -- and that is off-topic here as I understand the FAQ
    > because syntax highlighting is most often a user configurable feature.
    > Of course there's some gray area, and I think my /post scriptum/
    > addressed that.
    >
    > Cheers! --M


    FYI, I sent this post circa 5 PM. Not sure why it was delayed.

    Cheers! --M
    mlimber, Oct 17, 2005
    #10
  11. Mike Wahler Guest

    "mlimber" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > FYI, I sent this post circa 5 PM. Not sure why it was delayed.


    5 p.m. on which planet?

    BTW you're OT. :) :) :)

    -Mike
    Mike Wahler, Oct 17, 2005
    #11
  12. mlimber Guest

    Re: [OT] Dev c++ bold convention

    Mike Wahler wrote:
    > "mlimber" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > FYI, I sent this post circa 5 PM. Not sure why it was delayed.

    >
    > 5 p.m. on which planet?


    5 PM EST, an hour earlier than it actually appeared.

    > BTW you're OT. :) :) :)


    You are correct, and I've adjusted the subject accordingly!

    Cheers! --M
    mlimber, Oct 17, 2005
    #12
  13. Guest

    Well, the subject of who is "off-topic" is decided by the newsgroup
    community.

    So, I do now accept that the replies to my postings show that I am
    off-topic by these community standards.

    I'm sorry if my criticism of mlimber was unfair.

    O.k. I'll move on (re Mike Wahler's comment). Maybe I was
    oversensitive. I look forward to posting interesting questions as I
    learn more about the language.

    Paul Epstein
    , Oct 17, 2005
    #13
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