DHTML Software

Discussion in 'HTML' started by mab464, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. mab464

    mab464 Guest

    Hi everybody,
    Whats the best softwrare to create DHTML pages. commercial and non
    commercial (freeware). Also is there any good 'free' ebook on DHTML?
    searched the google but haven't found any yet.

    Thanks
    mab464, Jul 9, 2008
    #1
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  2. On Jul 8, 9:12 pm, "mab464" <> wrote:
    > Hi everybody,
    >         Whats the best softwrare to create DHTML pages. commercial and non
    > commercial (freeware). Also is there any good 'free' ebook on DHTML?
    > searched the google but haven't found any yet.
    >
    > Thanks


    Notepad?
    Travis Newbury, Jul 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. mab464

    David Segall Guest

    Ed Jay <> wrote:

    >Travis Newbury wrote:
    >
    >>On Jul 8, 9:12 pm, "mab464" <> wrote:
    >>> Hi everybody,
    >>>         Whats the best softwrare to create DHTML pages. commercial and non
    >>> commercial (freeware). Also is there any good 'free' ebook on DHTML?
    >>> searched the google but haven't found any yet.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >>Notepad?

    >
    >Notepad++ is free and a lot better than notepad, which is the basic text
    >editor that comes with Windows.
    ><http://notepad-plus.sourceforge.net/uk/site.htm>

    Travis was arguing in favour of an editor that provides _no_ help in
    writing [D]HTML except that it results in machine readable text if the
    user has a version of Windows. I'm sure he would have advocated the
    superior, cross-platform, pencil and paper if he thought the OP had
    hardware that could read it. You are proposing an editor that has
    syntax highlighting and, consequently, provides more assistance than
    Notepad but not as much as, say, Komposer. I think that means that you
    need to justify your choice whereas Travis' position is clear.
    David Segall, Jul 9, 2008
    #3
  4. On Jul 9, 11:17 am, Ed Jay <> wrote:
    > Notepad++ is free and a lot better than notepad, which is the basic text
    > editor that comes with Windows.
    > <http://notepad-plus.sourceforge.net/uk/site.htm>


    Actually I use notepad+ all the time for XML and quick fixes to HTML/
    css Great Program. But for heavy duty, I still prefer Dreamweaver
    CS3. I use the wysiwyg for basic layout then text mode for making it
    right.
    Travis Newbury, Jul 9, 2008
    #4
  5. On Jul 9, 4:59 am, Guy Macon <http://www.GuyMacon.com/> wrote:
    > I will point you at some online references, but you have to promise
    > to do something in return.


    Please don't ask for sex... Please don't ask for sex...

    > I want you to set up a audio-only
    > browser (as used by the blind), and test your Dynamic HTML pages
    > to make sure that you are not descriminating against blind people


    Phew....

    Just f'ck'ing with you Guy. Lighten up and have a great day.
    Travis Newbury, Jul 9, 2008
    #5
  6. mab464

    Bergamot Guest

    Guy Macon wrote:
    >
    > If you are using Windows, the best softwrare to create DHTML
    > pages is NotePad.


    Notepad sucks.

    There are far, far better tools out there, many of which are free. Lists
    of good editors come up in these groups often enough it should only take
    a few seconds to find them in the group archives.

    --
    Berg
    Bergamot, Jul 9, 2008
    #6
  7. mab464

    Bergamot Guest

    Ed Jay wrote:
    >
    > It's still around. <http://www.adobe.com/products/homesite/>
    >
    > In looking at the Adobe site, I find that I have an older version (5) versus
    > 5.5, so apparently they're still supporting it.


    I heard a rumor this was going to be the last release of Homesite, but
    who knows? It would be a shame if Adobe dropped it, coz it's a great editor.

    --
    Berg
    Bergamot, Jul 9, 2008
    #7
  8. On 2008-07-10, Ed Mullen wrote:
    >
    > Meaning (in most cases) "You get what you pay for."


    I find that: "The best things in life are free."
    Chris F.A. Johnson, Jul 10, 2008
    #8
  9. mab464

    Bergamot Guest

    Ed Mullen wrote:
    > Bergamot wrote:
    >>
    >> Notepad sucks.
    >>
    >> There are far, far better tools out there, many of which are free.

    >
    > And, well, what's with the whole "free" thing, anyway?


    The only reason to recommend Notepad as a development tool is because
    it's free. If you're looking for a free tool, there are much better
    choices. If you're not that cheap, then there are even more choices.

    --
    Berg
    Bergamot, Jul 10, 2008
    #9
  10. On Jul 9, 8:54 pm, Ed Mullen <> wrote:
    > And, well, what's with the whole "free" thing, anyway?  Is everyone here
    > so freaking poor that they can't afford $19 or $29 or $49 for a good
    > tool that they will use for years?  Good Lord!
    > Edit Pad Pro.  http://www.just-great-software.com/


    Someone needs to get them to change their screen shots. If you read
    about the features it sounds like the bee's knees. But the screen
    shots make the application look cluttered and very user unfriendly.
    Travis Newbury, Jul 10, 2008
    #10
  11. mab464

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 9 Jul, 02:12, "mab464" <> wrote:

    > Whats the best softwrare to create DHTML pages.


    The editor isn't the big question here. Use a sharpened stick, or use
    Eclipse, it's your call.
    Note though that you _will_ need to work at the code level, not
    WYSIWYG.

    The main issue is what you use as a framework to support your DHTML,
    and whether this is a set of client-side JS libraries (like the
    popular prototype.js) or if it's a full-blown server-side framework
    that allows you to work with with simple "tags" in your server-side
    page description code that give rise to huge great structures on the
    client, without you needing to touch the code (ICEfaces is the best
    around, for server-side Java, but you'll probably find yourself using
    Ruby on Rails or something instead).
    Andy Dingley, Jul 10, 2008
    #11
  12. On Jul 9, 8:50 pm, Ed Mullen <> wrote:
    > > Please don't ask for sex... Please don't ask for sex...
    > > Phew....

    > And, thank you, Travis!  You really had me terribly worried there for a
    > few seconds.  Geez, thank heavens for that speed reading course back in
    > the 60s.


    I have a huge void starting in 1970 when someone passed me a blunt. I
    woke up 11 years later standing at the alter getting married. (and in
    case my wife reads this, it has been bliss ever since...)
    Travis Newbury, Jul 10, 2008
    #12
  13. mab464

    Tim Streater Guest

    In article <>,
    Guy Macon <http://www.GuyMacon.com/> wrote:

    > Sherman Pendley wrote:
    > >
    > >Guy Macon <http://www.GuyMacon.com/> writes:
    > >
    > >> mab464 wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>Whats the best softwrare to create DHTML pages. commercial and non
    > >>>commercial (freeware).
    > >>
    > >> If you are using Windows, the best software to create DHTML
    > >> pages is NotePad. If you are using Linux, Pico.

    > >
    > >And for the Mac - BBEdit. It doesn't suck.

    >
    > So that I can make a good recomendation for the mac next time,
    > what is the simplest text editor with the fewest features on
    > the newer models?


    TextWrangler (most of BBEdit's features) is free for the Mac. I've never
    seen any need to use anything else.
    Tim Streater, Jul 10, 2008
    #13
  14. On Jul 10, 10:56 am, Guy Macon <http://www.GuyMacon.com/> wrote:
    > Even Notepad is slightly more full featured than I like.
    > I would prefer that the user be forced to format his
    > time/date entries by hand.


    What a retarded statement. Why not just make them use charred stick
    and a piece of animal hide.
    Travis Newbury, Jul 10, 2008
    #14
  15. mab464

    Bergamot Guest

    Guy Macon wrote:
    > Bergamot wrote:
    >>
    >>Notepad sucks.
    >>
    >>There are far, far better tools out there

    >
    > Those tools are far better *after* you learn the basics of creating
    > a page by hand.


    That's a matter of opinion, and I think yours is wrong. ;)

    > If you use a better tool from the start, it hurts
    > the learning process.


    Seems to be an editor that provides syntax highlighting would help the
    learning process, not hinder it. It certainly helps you find typos easier.

    > Once the new user knows how to close his tags, create
    > his tables, forms, and links, etc. by hand, *then* he
    > should look into tools that automate those tasks.


    Who said anything about automating tag completion, or even an editor
    that was html-centric?

    There are plenty of general purpose plain text editors that have nothing
    to do with web stuff specifically, but have tools that do make you more
    productive, like syntax highlighting, macros, extended search/replace,
    project or folder management, etc.

    Why make the learning process painful (using Notepad) if you don't have
    to (using something like Crimson Editor)?

    > Not before.


    Certainly, before.

    --
    Berg
    Bergamot, Jul 10, 2008
    #15
  16. On Jul 10, 3:47 pm, Neredbojias <me@http://www.neredbojias.net/_eml/
    fliam.php> wrote:
    > > On Jul 10, 10:56 am, Guy Macon <http://www.GuyMacon.com/> wrote:
    > >> Even Notepad is slightly more full featured than I like.
    > >> I would prefer that the user be forced to format his
    > >> time/date entries by hand.

    > > What a retarded statement.  Why not just make them use charred stick
    > > and a piece of animal hide.

    > 'Cause the font-size would tend to be non-uniform.


    Damn those font sizes!!! They always get me into trouble!
    Travis Newbury, Jul 10, 2008
    #16
  17. mab464

    David Segall Guest

    Guy Macon <http://www.GuyMacon.com/> wrote:

    >
    >For someone just starting out in creating web pages, I always
    >advise the simplest possible plain text editor.
    >You don't learn how to
    >design and build cas by buying and driving a Subaru or Honda.

    I think examining a real car provides far superior training in
    designing and building cars than a drafting table, a sheet of paper
    and a copy of "Teach Yourself Car Design in 21 Days".

    I would advise a beginner to "buy and drive" a web site (that uses
    CSS) from Open Source Web Design <http://www.oswd.org/>. I would also
    advise them to examine and alter it with the most high level
    development environment available. The best of them include a context
    sensitive reference book and can make navigating the DOM
    understandable. The latter is particularly important for beginners.

    I did not offer the above advice to the OP because he asked about
    DHTML rather than [X]HTML. I would still advocate a high level
    development environment but it is impossible to choose that without
    knowing the server-side processing, if any, he might favour.
    David Segall, Jul 12, 2008
    #17
  18. On Jul 12, 6:51 am, mbstevens <> wrote:
    > This is one of those pages where
    > passing validation is not enough.
    > I would suggest free, simpler, and more
    > robust templates fromhttp://realworldstyle.com/
    > or one of the similar free sites.


    Bookmarked. Thnaks
    Travis Newbury, Jul 12, 2008
    #18
  19. mab464

    David Segall Guest

    mbstevens <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 04:37:16 +0000, el David Segall punched in:
    >
    >> I would advise a beginner to "buy and drive" a web site (that uses CSS)
    >> from Open Source Web Design <http://www.oswd.org/>.

    >
    >
    >I browsed there in FFox3.0, and the text of
    >the opening page was writing
    >all over itself in the upper right hand corner.
    >I had to reduce text size before it was readable.
    >
    >This is one of those pages where
    >passing validation is not enough.
    >I would suggest free, simpler, and more
    >robust templates from
    >http://realworldstyle.com/
    >or one of the similar free sites.

    I was not suggesting the use of the OSWD site but one of the
    contributed open source sites. In fact, the OSWD site itself is not
    open source. Of course it is possible, even likely, that a contributed
    site has design flaws. I'm sure our putative car designer will find
    flaws in their Subaru or Honda. The virtue of OSWD, unlike Real World
    Style, is that it provides hundreds of designs.

    I confess that my advocacy of OSWD is biased and that I chose a design
    from there because I'm a programmer, not a designer. I was confident
    that I could fix problems with the XHTML/CSS but I did not want my
    site to look like a computer geek's site. For someone who's skill is
    in design, rather than technical, your recommendation is likely to be
    a better starting point.
    David Segall, Jul 12, 2008
    #19
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