disabling alt popup?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by jspyro, Jan 7, 2004.

  1. jspyro

    jspyro Guest

    Greetings!

    I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yello
    boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    attribute set.
    I mean, is there an other way to do it than simply setting alt to "

    jspyr
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    jspyro, Jan 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. jspyro wrote:
    > I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    > boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    > attribute set.


    Get a better browser, like Mozilla.
    Leif K-Brooks, Jan 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. jspyro

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <IcJKb.86$>,
    says...
    > > I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    > > boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    > > attribute set.

    > Get a better browser, like Mozilla.


    Why mislead a newbie like that? You are too cruel.

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Jan 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Whitecrest wrote:
    >>>I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    >>>boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    >>>attribute set.

    >>
    >>Get a better browser, like Mozilla.

    >
    > Why mislead a newbie like that? You are too cruel.


    Mozilla doesn't have the incorrect behavior that the OP didn't want. It
    blocks popups and spam. It's more secure. It has better standards
    compliance.
    Leif K-Brooks, Jan 7, 2004
    #4
  5. jspyro

    Mark Parnell Guest

    On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 18:50:02 -0600, jspyro declared in alt.html:

    > Greetings!
    >
    > I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    > boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    > attribute set.
    > I mean, is there an other way to do it than simply setting alt to ""


    Set the title attribute as well. If you don't want anything in there,
    try adding title="". From memory, that will stop IE from doing that,
    though I can't remember offhand whether it causes side effects in other
    browsers.

    --
    Mark Parnell
    http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
    Mark Parnell, Jan 7, 2004
    #5
  6. jspyro

    Kevin Scholl Guest

    Whitecrest wrote:

    >>>I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    >>>boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    >>>attribute set.

    >>
    >>Get a better browser, like Mozilla.

    >
    >
    > Why mislead a newbie like that? You are too cruel.


    How is Leif's comment misleading? The manner in which IE handles ALT
    attributes is incorrect. Therefore, this is a clear case where Mozilla
    is indeed better, as it handles the ALT attribute correctly according to
    the standard. Perfect example from our discussion in the "View source"
    thread -- you may PREFER that the ALT pop up as a tooltip, but
    QUALITATIVELY, doing so is incorrect.

    --

    *** Remove the DELETE from my address to reply ***

    ======================================================
    Kevin Scholl http://www.ksscholl.com/

    ------------------------------------------------------
    Information Architecture, Web Design and Development
    ------------------------------------------------------
    We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of
    the dreams...
    ======================================================
    Kevin Scholl, Jan 7, 2004
    #6
  7. jspyro

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > Whitecrest wrote:
    >
    > >>>I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    > >>>boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    > >>>attribute set.
    > >>Get a better browser, like Mozilla.

    > > Why mislead a newbie like that? You are too cruel.

    > How is Leif's comment misleading?


    Don't be stupid.

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Jan 7, 2004
    #7
  8. jspyro

    mark | r Guest

    use title="" as well, it will override it in ie

    mark

    "jspyro" <4designers.com> wrote in message
    news:4designers.com...
    >
    > Greetings!
    >
    > I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    > boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    > attribute set.
    > I mean, is there an other way to do it than simply setting alt to ""
    >
    >
    > jspyro
    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Posted via http://www.forum4designers.com
    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > View this thread: http://www.forum4designers.com/message29238.html
    >
    >
    >
    mark | r, Jan 7, 2004
    #8
  9. jspyro

    Safalra Guest

    Kevin Scholl <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Whitecrest wrote:
    > >>>I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    > >>>boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    > >>>attribute set.
    > >>
    > >>Get a better browser, like Mozilla.

    > >
    > > Why mislead a newbie like that? You are too cruel.

    >
    > How is Leif's comment misleading? The manner in which IE handles ALT
    > attributes is incorrect. Therefore, this is a clear case where Mozilla
    > is indeed better, as it handles the ALT attribute correctly according to
    > the standard.


    Are we looking at the same standard here? I see nothing that forbids
    UAs giving access to alt-text as a tool tip.

    --- Safalra (Stephen Morley) ---
    http://www.safalra.com/hypertext
    Safalra, Jan 7, 2004
    #9
  10. jspyro

    Kevin Scholl Guest

    Safalra wrote:

    >>>>>I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    >>>>>boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    >>>>>attribute set.
    >>>>
    >>>>Get a better browser, like Mozilla.
    >>>
    >>>Why mislead a newbie like that? You are too cruel.

    >>
    >>How is Leif's comment misleading? The manner in which IE handles ALT
    >>attributes is incorrect. Therefore, this is a clear case where Mozilla
    >>is indeed better, as it handles the ALT attribute correctly according to
    >>the standard.

    >
    >
    > Are we looking at the same standard here? I see nothing that forbids
    > UAs giving access to alt-text as a tool tip.


    That discussionhas been had ad naseum here and elsewhere. The TITLE
    attribute is for tooltips. The ALT attribute was not intended for such
    use, but rather for those who had/have text-only browsers, or images
    turned off.

    --

    *** Remove the DELETE from my address to reply ***

    ======================================================
    Kevin Scholl http://www.ksscholl.com/

    ------------------------------------------------------
    Information Architecture, Web Design and Development
    ------------------------------------------------------
    We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of
    the dreams...
    ======================================================
    Kevin Scholl, Jan 7, 2004
    #10
  11. jspyro

    Kris Guest

    In article <>,
    (Safalra) wrote:

    > > >>>I'm wondering if there is a way to disable the nasty little yellow
    > > >>>boxes that appears in IE when one hoovers over an image with the alt
    > > >>>attribute set.
    > > >>
    > > >>Get a better browser, like Mozilla.
    > > >
    > > > Why mislead a newbie like that? You are too cruel.

    > >
    > > How is Leif's comment misleading? The manner in which IE handles ALT
    > > attributes is incorrect. Therefore, this is a clear case where Mozilla
    > > is indeed better, as it handles the ALT attribute correctly according to
    > > the standard.

    >
    > Are we looking at the same standard here? I see nothing that forbids
    > UAs giving access to alt-text as a tool tip.


    ALT = 'alternative' (means, instead of), not 'addition' ("beside this
    image, did you know that...").

    --
    Kris
    erlands (nl)
    Kris, Jan 7, 2004
    #11
  12. jspyro

    jspyro Guest


    > Get a better browser, like Mozilla.

    Heh, no problem there. I just figured I'd be nice to...people i
    general, since there are still quite a few IE's out there.
    (to be honest, I happen to have all my bookmarks in IE, dead end ;-)

    > Set the title attribute as well. If you don't want anything in there,
    > try adding title="".

    That did the trick, thanks a lot!

    > though I can't remember offhand whether it causes side effects i
    > other browsers.


    At least not in MozillaFirebird. I guess lynx users etc. won't be m
    main audience..

    jspyr
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    Posted via http://www.forum4designers.co
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    View this thread: http://www.forum4designers.com/message29238.htm
    jspyro, Jan 7, 2004
    #12
  13. Safalra wrote:

    > Are we looking at the same standard here? I see nothing that forbids
    > UAs giving access to alt-text as a tool tip.


    There is nothing explicitly forbidding it, but the specs do tend to
    suggest an either/or relationship -- that is either display the image or
    the alt text, but not both.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
    Toby A Inkster, Jan 7, 2004
    #13
  14. "Kevin Scholl" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    <snip>
    >>Are we looking at the same standard here? I see nothing that
    >>forbids UAs giving access to alt-text as a tool tip.

    >
    >That discussionhas been had ad naseum here and elsewhere. The
    >TITLE attribute is for tooltips. The ALT attribute was not
    >intended for such use, but rather for those who had/have
    >text-only browsers, or images turned off.


    I have often thought that if TITLE was intended to be a tooltip then it
    would have bean clearer to call the attribute TOOLTIP, though I don't
    see any good reason why TITLE text should not be manifested as a
    tooltip-like pop-up in visual browsers and it certainly seems a better
    candidate for text intended to be a tooltip than ALT.

    ALT on the other hand seems to be intended as an aid for when the image
    cannot be properly perceived as an image. That might mean that images
    have been turned off (or are unsupported), or it might mean that the
    restricted perception is on the part of the user. That would directly
    apply to visual impairment but might extend to other forms of
    "disability" relating to perception (perhaps forms of Synesthesia?). In
    the latter case the user might appreciate the ability to supplement
    their problematic visual reading of the image with direct access to the
    ALT text.

    That makes me think that it would be better not to impose a particular
    interpretation of the intention of these attributes on a browsers but
    instead to make the possibilities available as user configurable
    settings and impose no more than an initial default configuration.

    Richard.
    Richard Cornford, Jan 7, 2004
    #14
  15. jspyro

    Glen Heater Guest

    Richard Cornford <> wrote:
    > if TITLE was intended to be a tooltip then it
    > would have bean clearer to call the attribute TOOLTIP


    Who said it was intended to be a tooltip? That may be the way MS chose
    to display it but other Operating systems/browsers may use other
    methods. Mine displays such messages in an alert in the corner of the
    screen, which is the way I'd expect it to appear on this OS.

    I suppose there's no reason TITLE text couldn't appear in a bar or
    something.



    > ALT on the other hand seems to be intended as an aid for when the image
    > cannot be properly perceived as an image.


    "text that is rendered when the image cannot be displayed" is what the
    specs say.

    http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/struct/objects.html


    > it might mean that the
    > restricted perception is on the part of the user. That would directly
    > apply to visual impairment but might extend to other forms of
    > "disability" relating to perception


    Surely such people would rely on more specialist browsers or browsers
    with modes/features to affect the way the page is interpreted/rendered
    to aid them (such as Opera). There's no need for people with good
    vision to have features forced upon them that were intended for
    visually impaired people. It's more reasonable to expect someone who
    can't 'percieve' images to disable them and have the alt text display
    instead (or use whatever modes/settings the browser has to aid them).


    > the user might appreciate the ability to supplement
    > their problematic visual reading of the image with direct access to the
    > ALT text.


    But the problem with this is that by supplementing something with its
    intended alternative may result in confusion. There are many
    occasions where my ALT text bears no connection to the image or its
    purpose when rendered in a mainstream browser. To show that text
    outside it's intended context makes no sense, however when a text or
    speech browser interprets the page it makes sense. (in such cases I use
    title="" to suppress the tooltips). An example is "Site navigation" as
    the alt text of a logo because without CSS the logo is followed by a
    list of links. It's only the CSS that puts the links and logo in two
    different places in the screen in a modern graphical browser.

    If I had a photo of an object or place then the longdesc attribute
    would be a preferred method of helping visually impaired users '
    perceive' that image. I'd probably not want to use ALT text for that
    since a picture paints a thousand words :)


    > it would be better not to impose a particular
    > interpretation of the intention of these attributes on a browsers but
    > instead to make the possibilities available as user configurable
    > settings and impose no more than an initial default configuration.


    if the specs were so ambiguous the attributes would be next to useless
    as different authors would have different opinions about how they
    should be used, and different users would have varing settings.. so how
    could you ever know if your alt text would work as intended. Users
    would find that the nature of alt/title text varied so much that they'd
    probably disable it along with Javascript warnings.

    Specs are only as good as they are precise.
    Glen Heater, Jan 8, 2004
    #15
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