Documenting Networking in Ruby. Any volunteer

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Victor Reyes, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. Victor Reyes

    Victor Reyes Guest

    [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

    Team,

    Is there a good book exclusively devoted to Networking in Ruby?

    As I continue learning and struggling on my journey to become a Rubyst (is
    it Rubist?), I noticed that my suffering could be lessen if I could put my
    hands on a good Ruby book exclusively dedicated to networking.
    Something like "Networking in Ruby" or "Ruby in a Networked World" or
    something to that effect. That book would collect all the current knowledge
    in network programming, as it relates to Ruby:


    1. Sockets - This would describe all type of socket programming.
    2. HTTP with all its variations.
    3. Threads as it relates to Inter-Process Communications.
    4. NET
    5. SSL
    6. SSH
    7. FTP
    8. EventMachine
    9. GServer
    10. DB (DB2, Oracle, PostGres, MySql) communications.
    11. ...and everything else I missed here, which I bet is more than what I
    listed here!


    To be successful and useful the book must go beyond what's covered on RDoc.
    It should have myriads of examples for people that learn by example, like I.
    The book should also cover the major platforms *NIX, Mac, Wintel.
    It should also cover networking on small devices such as cell phones, etc. I
    think all the info is already loosely available and it is just matter of
    putting things together.

    I might be asking for too much!

    Any comments!

    Thanks you

    Victor
     
    Victor Reyes, Jun 13, 2008
    #1
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  2. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Victor Reyes wrote:

    |
    | To be successful and useful the book must go beyond what's covered on
    RDoc.
    | It should have myriads of examples for people that learn by example,
    like I.
    | The book should also cover the major platforms *NIX, Mac, Wintel.
    | It should also cover networking on small devices such as cell phones,
    etc. I
    | think all the info is already loosely available and it is just matter of
    | putting things together.

    Have you looked at The Ruby Way by Hal Fulton? While it doesn't cover
    networking exclusively, it does cover a big part of it, and loads of
    other Ruby-related stuff (you should buy it anyway ;).

    - --
    Phillip Gawlowski
    Twitter: twitter.com/cynicalryan
    Blog: http://justarubyist.blogspot.com

    ~ - You know you've been hacking too long when...
    ...you want to retract something said in haste, and think C-a C-@ C-e C-w
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.4.8 (MingW32)
    Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org

    iEYEARECAAYFAkhS0QUACgkQbtAgaoJTgL9VywCfSOGdv4nmzGq0t43TxPs+EXzt
    04oAn33KrycJObcY5WQrey1UBLGK6BiT
    =ku6c
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
     
    Phillip Gawlowski, Jun 13, 2008
    #2
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  3. [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

    2008/6/13, Victor Reyes <>:
    >
    > Team,
    >
    > Is there a good book exclusively devoted to Networking in Ruby?
    >
    > As I continue learning and struggling on my journey to become a Rubyst (is
    > it Rubist?), I noticed that my suffering could be lessen if I could put my
    > hands on a good Ruby book exclusively dedicated to networking.
    > Something like "Networking in Ruby" or "Ruby in a Networked World" or
    > something to that effect. That book would collect all the current knowledge
    > in network programming, as it relates to Ruby:
    >
    >
    > 1. Sockets - This would describe all type of socket programming.
    > 2. HTTP with all its variations.
    > 3. Threads as it relates to Inter-Process Communications.
    > 4. NET
    > 5. SSL
    > 6. SSH
    > 7. FTP
    > 8. EventMachine
    > 9. GServer
    > 10. DB (DB2, Oracle, PostGres, MySql) communications.
    > 11. ...and everything else I missed here, which I bet is more than what
    > I
    > listed here!
    >
    >
    > To be successful and useful the book must go beyond what's covered on RDoc.
    > It should have myriads of examples for people that learn by example, like
    > I.
    > The book should also cover the major platforms *NIX, Mac, Wintel.
    > It should also cover networking on small devices such as cell phones, etc.
    > I
    > think all the info is already loosely available and it is just matter of
    > putting things together.
    >
    > I might be asking for too much!
    >
    > Any comments!
    >
    > Thanks you
    >
    >
    > Victor






    Well, it's not possible to cover all what you are looking for in one book.
    Probably one for each section should do the job.
     
    Oscar Del Ben, Jun 13, 2008
    #3
  4. On 13 Jun 2008, at 20:39, Victor Reyes wrote:
    > Is there a good book exclusively devoted to Networking in Ruby?


    Not yet, although you can piece bits and bobs together from The Ruby
    Way, the Pickaxe and a few other sources. Most of the time I rely on
    google but even there documentation and tutorials are less
    comprehensive than a beginner would need which is a great pity, all
    things considered.


    Ellie

    Eleanor McHugh
    Games With Brains
    http://slides.games-with-brains.net
    ----
    raise ArgumentError unless @reality.responds_to? :reason
     
    Eleanor McHugh, Jun 14, 2008
    #4
  5. Victor Reyes

    Victor Reyes Guest

    [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

    On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:36 PM, Eleanor McHugh <
    > wrote:

    > On 13 Jun 2008, at 20:39, Victor Reyes wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a good book exclusively devoted to Networking in Ruby?
    >>

    >
    > Not yet, although you can piece bits and bobs together from The Ruby Way,
    > the Pickaxe and a few other sources. Most of the time I rely on google but
    > even there documentation and tutorials are less comprehensive than a
    > beginner would need which is a great pity, all things considered.
    >
    >
    > Ellie
    >
    > Eleanor McHugh
    > Games With Brains
    > http://slides.games-with-brains.net
    > ----
    > raise ArgumentError unless @reality.responds_to? :reason
    >
    >
    >

    * Phillip Gawlowski*: I actually have 1rst and 2nd Editions of The Ruby Way.
    I also have Programming Ruby, Ruby in nutshell, the new book by Matz and
    Flannagan, and at least another dozen Ruby books.
    None of these books go beyond briefly proving the same basic examples of TCP
    Client/Server and UDP, and some a bit of Socket programming. I heard of
    GServer from a book I just purchase from a British guy (Sorry forgot the
    name and I don't have the book with me) which I think is entitle Beginner
    Ruby.

    *Oscar Del Ben*: Well, I know it is a large subject, however, if you take
    for example the length of The Ruby Way or Programming Ruby or the new Matz
    book, Etc., a book of that size dedicated to the subjects I mentioned above
    I think would make it a hit. Think about it, a one stop shop for all your
    networking needs, in Ruby of course!

    * Eleanor McHugh*: This is what I am talking about. There is no real
    documentation even on the web. I, a beginner, rely on my books (which fall
    short) and on the Ruby Q/A Forum. You answered some of my questions before
    about GServer.

    In addition to network programming, you look around and will find the same
    issues with a different subject: GUI Programming in Ruby.
    If you *wc -w* the number of times the word GUI appears on this forum you
    can easily conclude that the subject is controversial and not well
    organized. You have tons of GUI tools out there for Ruby but we don't know
    how to or where to find it. Once you find, then the problem is
    documentation.

    I think there is a vacuum for a:


    1. An excellent Networking Ruby book.
    2. An excellent Ruby GUI Programming book.

    Seriously team, there are lots of people like me that learn by example. The
    only time I go to the forum is when I tried everything else (my extensive
    ruby library, google, Etc.).

    Oh well, I guess I am dreaming, but this does not have to be a project for
    one person. By reading the posts on this forum and have observed very clever
    people who can not just write code, but they can also explain it. With
    permissions of the different forum collaborators, one can get examples from
    the forum, clean them and test them and publish a nice book. Examples in the
    book would acknowledge the forum collaborator(s) of such example(s).

    Best regards,

    Victor
     
    Victor Reyes, Jun 15, 2008
    #5
  6. On 15 Jun 2008, at 12:50, Victor Reyes wrote:
    > * Eleanor McHugh*: This is what I am talking about. There is no real
    > documentation even on the web. I, a beginner, rely on my books
    > (which fall
    > short) and on the Ruby Q/A Forum. You answered some of my questions
    > before
    > about GServer.


    Probably quite inaccurately as I've pieced together all of my
    knowledge about Ruby networking from direct experimentation, the few
    tutorials on the web and reading the source code. The fact that I've
    written network code in other languages made this fairly easy for me,
    but I dread to think how a beginner coming to Ruby without that
    background would make any headway.

    At some point I will write up my research in detail and publishing it
    online, but time is the one resource I never seem to have enough of...


    Ellie

    Eleanor McHugh
    Games With Brains
    http://slides.games-with-brains.net
    ----
    raise ArgumentError unless @reality.responds_to? :reason
     
    Eleanor McHugh, Jun 15, 2008
    #6
  7. Victor Reyes

    Victor Reyes Guest

    [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

    On Sun, Jun 15, 2008 at 11:26 AM, Eleanor McHugh <
    > wrote:

    > On 15 Jun 2008, at 12:50, Victor Reyes wrote:
    >
    >> * Eleanor McHugh*: This is what I am talking about. There is no real
    >> documentation even on the web. I, a beginner, rely on my books (which fall
    >> short) and on the Ruby Q/A Forum. You answered some of my questions before
    >> about GServer.
    >>

    >
    > Probably quite inaccurately as I've pieced together all of my knowledge
    > about Ruby networking from direct experimentation, the few tutorials on the
    > web and reading the source code. The fact that I've written network code in
    > other languages made this fairly easy for me, but I dread to think how a
    > beginner coming to Ruby without that background would make any headway.
    >
    > At some point I will write up my research in detail and publishing it
    > online, but time is the one resource I never seem to have enough of...
    >
    >
    >
    > Ellie
    >
    > Eleanor McHugh
    > Games With Brains
    > http://slides.games-with-brains.net
    > ----
    > raise ArgumentError unless @reality.responds_to? :reason
    >
    >
    >
    > Ellie,


    Actually, your code works fine, at least for what I needed it for.
    I'll be looking forward to reading and learning from your publication, when
    it comes out!

    Thank you and everyone for the help and support you guys provide daily.

    Victor
     
    Victor Reyes, Jun 16, 2008
    #7
  8. [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

    On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 3:39 PM, Victor Reyes <>
    wrote:

    > Team,
    >
    > Is there a good book exclusively devoted to Networking in Ruby?
    >
    > As I continue learning and struggling on my journey to become a Rubyst (is
    > it Rubist?), I noticed that my suffering could be lessen if I could put my
    > hands on a good Ruby book exclusively dedicated to networking.
    > Something like "Networking in Ruby" or "Ruby in a Networked World" or
    > something to that effect. That book would collect all the current knowledge
    > in network programming, as it relates to Ruby:
    >
    >
    > 1. Sockets - This would describe all type of socket programming.
    > 2. HTTP with all its variations.
    > 3. Threads as it relates to Inter-Process Communications.
    > 4. NET
    > 5. SSL
    > 6. SSH
    > 7. FTP
    > 8. EventMachine
    > 9. GServer
    > 10. DB (DB2, Oracle, PostGres, MySql) communications.
    > 11. ...and everything else I missed here, which I bet is more than what I
    > listed here!
    >
    >
    > To be successful and useful the book must go beyond what's covered on RDoc.
    > It should have myriads of examples for people that learn by example, like
    > I.
    > The book should also cover the major platforms *NIX, Mac, Wintel.
    > It should also cover networking on small devices such as cell phones, etc.
    > I
    > think all the info is already loosely available and it is just matter of
    > putting things together.
    >


    You might want to check out the Ruby Cookbook. While it doesn't cover
    everything you mentioned, it does provide great examples for the areas it
    does cover.

    Michael Guterl
     
    Michael Guterl, Jun 16, 2008
    #8
  9. Victor Reyes

    Victor Reyes Guest

    [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

    On Mon, Jun 16, 2008 at 9:18 AM, Michael Guterl <> wrote:

    > On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 3:39 PM, Victor Reyes <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Team,
    > >
    > > Is there a good book exclusively devoted to Networking in Ruby?
    > >
    > > As I continue learning and struggling on my journey to become a Rubyst

    > (is
    > > it Rubist?), I noticed that my suffering could be lessen if I could put

    > my
    > > hands on a good Ruby book exclusively dedicated to networking.
    > > Something like "Networking in Ruby" or "Ruby in a Networked World" or
    > > something to that effect. That book would collect all the current

    > knowledge
    > > in network programming, as it relates to Ruby:
    > >
    > >
    > > 1. Sockets - This would describe all type of socket programming.
    > > 2. HTTP with all its variations.
    > > 3. Threads as it relates to Inter-Process Communications.
    > > 4. NET
    > > 5. SSL
    > > 6. SSH
    > > 7. FTP
    > > 8. EventMachine
    > > 9. GServer
    > > 10. DB (DB2, Oracle, PostGres, MySql) communications.
    > > 11. ...and everything else I missed here, which I bet is more than what

    > I
    > > listed here!
    > >
    > >
    > > To be successful and useful the book must go beyond what's covered on

    > RDoc.
    > > It should have myriads of examples for people that learn by example, like
    > > I.
    > > The book should also cover the major platforms *NIX, Mac, Wintel.
    > > It should also cover networking on small devices such as cell phones,

    > etc.
    > > I
    > > think all the info is already loosely available and it is just matter of
    > > putting things together.
    > >

    >
    > You might want to check out the Ruby Cookbook. While it doesn't cover
    > everything you mentioned, it does provide great examples for the areas it
    > does cover.
    >
    > Michael Guterl
    >

    Michael,

    You are correct. The book is large, but it only covers a minute number of
    the items I mentioned. But it makes a reasonable reference.
    Ruby Cookbook
    By: Lucas Carlson & Leonard Richardson
    Which has 23 chapters and around 823 pages.

    I browsed the book on the web at:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=AN...ct=title&cad=one-book-with-thumbnail#PPR17,M1

    I just purchased the new book by Flannagan and Matz for reference. It is
    actually a very nice book, which, of course is for documenting the Ruby
    language. Therefore you will not find networking there.

    Thank you for the recommendation.

    Victor
     
    Victor Reyes, Jun 16, 2008
    #9
  10. Victor Reyes

    Amr Kamel Guest

    Victor Reyes wrote:
    > On Mon, Jun 16, 2008 at 9:18 AM, Michael Guterl <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> my
    >> > 4. NET
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >> You might want to check out the Ruby Cookbook. While it doesn't cover
    >> everything you mentioned, it does provide great examples for the areas it
    >> does cover.
    >>
    >> Michael Guterl
    >>

    > Michael,
    >
    > You are correct. The book is large, but it only covers a minute number
    > of
    > the items I mentioned. But it makes a reasonable reference.
    > Ruby Cookbook
    > By: Lucas Carlson & Leonard Richardson
    > Which has 23 chapters and around 823 pages.
    >
    > I browsed the book on the web at:
    > http://books.google.com/books?id=AN...ct=title&cad=one-book-with-thumbnail#PPR17,M1
    >
    > I just purchased the new book by Flannagan and Matz for reference. It is
    > actually a very nice book, which, of course is for documenting the Ruby
    > language. Therefore you will not find networking there.
    >
    > Thank you for the recommendation.
    >
    > Victor


    @Victor Reyes,

    May be we can start a book on wikibooks see
    (http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Main_Page) if you like the idea we can
    start instantly. You can contact me on amrkamel (AT) gmail (DOT) com.

    Best regards,

    Amr M. Kamel.

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
     
    Amr Kamel, Jul 22, 2008
    #10
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