Does VHDL cares for R, L, C components?

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by Vagant, Oct 18, 2007.

  1. Vagant

    Vagant Guest

    Hello,

    I wonder whether VHDL allows description of R, L, C components (which
    stand for resistance, inductance and capacity) in the projects.
    Obviosly some digital schematics use R, L, C components for waveform
    generation, transformation.
    There are also digital resistance chips which are helpful in
    programming a resistance which changes in steps.
    Vagant, Oct 18, 2007
    #1
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  2. Vagant

    KJ Guest

    "Vagant" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I wonder whether VHDL allows description of R, L, C components (which
    > stand for resistance, inductance and capacity) in the projects.
    > Obviosly some digital schematics use R, L, C components for waveform
    > generation, transformation.
    > There are also digital resistance chips which are helpful in
    > programming a resistance which changes in steps.
    >

    If you're looking for a 'digital' type of model (i.e. all I/O signals can be
    represented by std_logic type) then yes plain vanilla VHDL can be used to
    model anything including resistors, capacitors and inductors, etc.

    If you're looking to model true analog type of behaviour then you would
    probably better off using Spice but, depending on your needs, VHDL-AMS might
    do want you want as well. http://www.eda.org/vhdl-ams/

    KJ
    KJ, Oct 18, 2007
    #2
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  3. Vagant

    Andy Guest

    On Oct 18, 4:09 am, Vagant <> wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I wonder whether VHDL allows description of R, L, C components (which
    > stand for resistance, inductance and capacity) in the projects.
    > Obviosly some digital schematics use R, L, C components for waveform
    > generation, transformation.
    > There are also digital resistance chips which are helpful in
    > programming a resistance which changes in steps.


    Digitally, a capacitor is usually modeled as an open circuit, with
    both ports either input or driving 'Z'.

    An inductor is usually modeled as a wire (good luck with that), but it
    rarely matters if it is an open circuit in a digital simulation.

    A resistor is usually modeled as a bidirectional strength reducer ('1'
    -> 'H' -> 'Z', etc.) so that pullups/terminators work as expected in
    the digital simulation.

    Beyond that, there's VHDL-AMS, but that's a whole different ballgame.

    Andy
    Andy, Oct 18, 2007
    #3
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