download free source programs in C

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by shendeajay@gmail.com, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Hi friends,

    Download the hundreds of source programs in C language from

    http://www.geocities.com/t1softwares/cprg.htm

    I have downloaded many C programs from above link. These programs are
    very useful for students as well as for teachers of C language. There
    are all types of C programs on above website like
    Programs based on arrays, String, all sorting methods in C, file
    creation and records addition, Structures and unions in C etc...

    To download the programs from above website

    Click on Download

    And also Download High quality DSF (Data Structure and files) programs
    in C from

    http://www.geocities.com/t1softwares/dsfprg.htm

    There are many programs on above website. The programs includes all
    linked list operations, (Create, append, addbegin,insert,delete..) and
    also programs based on other data structures in C language such as
    Graph, Trees, Arrays, Queues and Stacks etc..

    To download the DSF programs from above website
    Click on download.
     
    , Aug 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. said:

    > Hi friends,
    >
    > Download the hundreds of source programs in C language from
    >
    > http://www.geocities.com/t1softwares/cprg.htm
    >

    <snip>
    >
    > To download the programs from above website
    >
    > Click on Download


    Unzipping results in this message:

    End-of-central-directory signature not found. Either this file is not
    a zipfile, or it constitutes one disk of a multi-part archive. In the
    latter case the central directory and zipfile comment will be found on
    the last disk(s) of this archive.

    > And also Download High quality DSF (Data Structure and files) programs
    > in C from
    >
    > http://www.geocities.com/t1softwares/dsfprg.htm


    Same message.

    --
    Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    Email: -www. +rjh@
    Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
     
    Richard Heathfield, Aug 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. In article <>,
    Richard Heathfield <> wrote:
    ....
    >Unzipping results in this message:
    >
    > End-of-central-directory signature not found. Either this file is not
    > a zipfile, or it constitutes one disk of a multi-part archive. In the
    > latter case the central directory and zipfile comment will be found on
    > the last disk(s) of this archive.


    Gee, ya think? Ya think that, maybe, just maybe, these aren't really
    ZIP files? Wow. Ya think that, maybe, just maybe, the first two bytes
    of the file are 'M' and 'Z'? Better check it out.
     
    Kenny McCormack, Aug 6, 2007
    #3
  4. Ws Guest

    On Aug 5, 11:30 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:
    > said:
    > > To download the programs from above website
    > > Click on Download

    > End-of-central-directory signature not found. Either this file is not
    > a zipfile, or it constitutes one disk of a multi-part archive. In the
    > latter case the central directory and zipfile comment will be found on
    > the last disk(s) of this archive.


    /sigh
    Richard, I would just like to point out NOT to open unknown links/
    files.

    Rule #1: If you don't know the person, be careful of opening links.

    Rule #2: Always check the magic bytes of the file. If you do not know
    about magic bytes, look them up. If it makes it easier, and you're
    using *nix, you may well have access to a command called `file'. Use
    it, it's your best friend. It'll look at the magic for you!

    $ file test.jpg
    test.jpg: PC bitmap data, Windows 3.x format, 400 x 400 x 1

    Rule #3: Do not open download files off of links to sites that are not
    reputable or have a history without running a virus/spyware scanner on
    them. Seriously, this is about the same magnitude as rule #1.

    Rule #4: USE COMMON SENSE. This goes for rules #1 and #3 also, but I
    feel it deserves noting here. This is a _programming_ newsgroup. The
    Orig. Poster noted
    > > To download the programs from above website
    > > Click on Download

    If a programmer doesn't get the idea to "Click on Download" to
    download files, then there's something wrong...





    -Wes
     
    Ws, Aug 6, 2007
    #4
  5. Ws said:

    <snip>

    > Richard, I would just like to point out NOT to open unknown links/
    > files.


    Why ever not?

    > Rule #1: If you don't know the person, be careful of opening links.


    How do you open a link "carefully"? Either you follow the link or you
    don't. Click, or don't click. Tab down and hit enter, or don't tab down
    and hit enter.

    Do you know the Web designers at the BBC personally? Or CNN? Or whatever
    your preferred RL news site is? If so, pick another relevant example.
    And if not, are you "careful" about the links you open? If so, how?

    > Rule #2: Always check the magic bytes of the file.


    How can you do this without downloading it? Note, too, that not all
    files have "magic bytes" as you call them.

    > If you do not know
    > about magic bytes, look them up. If it makes it easier, and you're
    > using *nix, you may well have access to a command called `file'. Use
    > it, it's your best friend. It'll look at the magic for you!


    Works over the Web, does it? If not, how can you look at it without
    first downloading it?

    > $ file test.jpg
    > test.jpg: PC bitmap data, Windows 3.x format, 400 x 400 x 1
    >
    > Rule #3: Do not open download files off of links to sites that are not
    > reputable or have a history without running a virus/spyware scanner on
    > them. Seriously, this is about the same magnitude as rule #1.


    <shrug> Is my site "reputable"? Is yours?

    > Rule #4: USE COMMON SENSE. This goes for rules #1 and #3 also, but I
    > feel it deserves noting here. This is a _programming_ newsgroup. The
    > Orig. Poster noted
    >> > To download the programs from above website
    >> > Click on Download

    > If a programmer doesn't get the idea to "Click on Download" to
    > download files, then there's something wrong...


    Yes, but that *might* have been because the OP was bright enough to
    understand Sturgeon's Law as applied to Usenet users. I invariably give
    people too *little* information because I keep thinking they're bright
    enough to work it out - despite much evidence to the contrary.

    --
    Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    Email: -www. +rjh@
    Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
     
    Richard Heathfield, Aug 6, 2007
    #5
  6. >>>>> "Ws" == Ws <> writes:

    Ws> /sigh Richard, I would just like to point out NOT to open
    Ws> unknown links/ files.

    Ws> Rule #1: If you don't know the person, be careful of opening
    Ws> links.

    Rule #0: if you use an operating system that confuses data and
    executable content, and that doesn't use the concept of appropriate
    privilege levels, it's time to get a different operating system.

    Charlton


    --
    Charlton Wilbur
     
    Charlton Wilbur, Aug 6, 2007
    #6
  7. "Charlton Wilbur" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >>>>>> "Ws" == Ws <> writes:

    >
    > Ws> /sigh Richard, I would just like to point out NOT to open
    > Ws> unknown links/ files.
    >
    > Ws> Rule #1: If you don't know the person, be careful of opening
    > Ws> links.
    >
    > Rule #0: if you use an operating system that confuses data and
    > executable content, and that doesn't use the concept of appropriate
    > privilege levels, it's time to get a different operating system.
    >

    That's actually one definition of a computer. It can treat its data as
    executable instructions.

    --
    Free games and programming goodies.
    http://www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~bgy1mm
     
    Malcolm McLean, Aug 6, 2007
    #7
  8. Chris Dollin Guest

    Malcolm McLean wrote:

    >
    > "Charlton Wilbur" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>>>>>> "Ws" == Ws <> writes:

    >>
    >> Ws> /sigh Richard, I would just like to point out NOT to open
    >> Ws> unknown links/ files.
    >>
    >> Ws> Rule #1: If you don't know the person, be careful of opening
    >> Ws> links.
    >>
    >> Rule #0: if you use an operating system that confuses data and
    >> executable content, and that doesn't use the concept of appropriate
    >> privilege levels, it's time to get a different operating system.
    >>

    > That's actually one definition of a computer. It can treat its data as
    > executable instructions.


    "Being able to treat as" and "confuses with" are not the same concept.

    --
    Chris "/I/ unite, /you/ confuse, /they/ can't tell the difference?" Dollin

    Hewlett-Packard Limited registered office: Cain Road, Bracknell,
    registered no: 690597 England Berks RG12 1HN
     
    Chris Dollin, Aug 7, 2007
    #8
  9. [snips]

    On Mon, 06 Aug 2007 15:34:50 +0000, Ws wrote:

    > Rule #1: If you don't know the person, be careful of opening links.


    Why? Is some evil net monster going to attack?

    > Rule #2: Always check the magic bytes of the file.


    Why, is some evil file type monster going to attack?

    > Rule #3: Do not open download files off of links to sites that are not
    > reputable or have a history without running a virus/spyware scanner on
    > them. Seriously, this is about the same magnitude as rule #1.


    Virus scanner? Spyware scanner? Blech; not sure such things even exist
    for my OS... other than to scan for threats to that other OS.

    > Rule #4: USE COMMON SENSE.


    Like not using an OS whose security model most closely resembles a Swiss
    cheese after a shotgun blast? :)
     
    Kelsey Bjarnason, Aug 7, 2007
    #9
  10. Bliton Guest

    On Aug 7, 9:26 am, Kelsey Bjarnason <> wrote:
    > [snips]
    >
    > On Mon, 06 Aug 2007 15:34:50 +0000, Ws wrote:
    > > Rule #1: If you don't know the person, be careful of opening links.

    >
    > Why? Is some evil net monster going to attack?
    >
    > > Rule #2: Always check the magic bytes of the file.

    >
    > Why, is some evil file type monster going to attack?
    >
    > > Rule #3: Do not open download files off of links to sites that are not
    > > reputable or have a history without running a virus/spyware scanner on
    > > them. Seriously, this is about the same magnitude as rule #1.

    >
    > Virus scanner? Spyware scanner? Blech; not sure such things even exist
    > for my OS... other than to scan for threats to that other OS.
    >
    > > Rule #4: USE COMMON SENSE.

    >
    > Like not using an OS whose security model most closely resembles a Swiss
    > cheese after a shotgun blast? :)


    I think threats to computer are caused due to files which has
    extension .exe. That's how viruses are spread I guess. If you know
    about other file types which contains viruses or any malicious code
    please let me know. You said about magic bytes. What are these magic
    bytes.
     
    Bliton, Aug 9, 2007
    #10
  11. Flash Gordon Guest

    Bliton wrote, On 09/08/07 18:13:
    > On Aug 7, 9:26 am, Kelsey Bjarnason <> wrote:
    >> [snips]
    >>
    >> On Mon, 06 Aug 2007 15:34:50 +0000, Ws wrote:


    <snip>

    >>> Rule #4: USE COMMON SENSE.

    >> Like not using an OS whose security model most closely resembles a Swiss
    >> cheese after a shotgun blast? :)

    >
    > I think threats to computer are caused due to files which has
    > extension .exe. That's how viruses are spread I guess.


    You guess wrong, or at least incompletely. For a start I remember
    receiving (but not being infected by) a word virus in a .doc

    > If you know
    > about other file types which contains viruses or any malicious code
    > please let me know. You said about magic bytes. What are these magic
    > bytes.


    Bytes that perform magic. More specifically, they are specific byte
    sequences at the start of certain types of file.

    All this is off topic, so please find a more appropriate place if you
    want to discus it further.
    --
    Flash Gordon
     
    Flash Gordon, Aug 9, 2007
    #11
  12. [snips]

    On Thu, 09 Aug 2007 10:13:55 -0700, Bliton wrote:

    > I think threats to computer are caused due to files which has extension
    > .exe.


    Or .com or .scr or .doc or...

    > That's how viruses are spread I guess.


    In some systems, perhaps. Feel free to send me a thousand infected .EXE
    files; I guarantee they won't infect my machine - and I don't even run
    ant-virus tools.

    > If you know about other
    > file types which contains viruses or any malicious code please let me
    > know.


    There's too many to keep track of, if you're a Windows user.
     
    Kelsey Bjarnason, Aug 9, 2007
    #12
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