Dude?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Robert Dober, May 17, 2008.

  1. Robert Dober

    Robert Dober Guest

    Dear native speakers

    I have been quite bothered with the usage of the word "dude" recently.
    Not that I dislike the word itself but I feel it should be reserved to
    friends using it in a quite informal context.
    Am I wrong and do I have to adapt or is there some kind of agreement
    with my POV?

    And sorry if you think this kind of netiquette question is OT.

    Thanks in advantage
    Robert
     
    Robert Dober, May 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. Robert Dober

    Robert Dober Guest

    > Thanks in advantage
    advance LOL
     
    Robert Dober, May 17, 2008
    #2
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  3. On Sat, May 17, 2008 at 4:10 PM, Robert Dober <> wrote:
    > Dear native speakers
    >
    > I have been quite bothered with the usage of the word "dude" recently.
    > Not that I dislike the word itself but I feel it should be reserved to
    > friends using it in a quite informal context.
    > Am I wrong and do I have to adapt or is there some kind of agreement
    > with my POV?
    >
    > And sorry if you think this kind of netiquette question is OT.


    Well, I'm no native speaker myself, but I'm pretty certain that you
    can just do following, really simple

    def dudify(context)
    context.send('dude')
    rescue NoMethodError
    def context.dude
    ''
    end
    end

    Now, everytime you are unsure if your context replies well to dude,
    you can just dudify it beforehand, and everytime you send another dude
    it will just blank it out.
    Of course you could use a polite version for special occasions:

    def dudify(context)
    return if context.respond_to?:)dude)
    def context.dude
    ''
    end
    end

    But if you are frequenting rubyist circles then it shouldn't be any
    problem to just rely on duck typing and stop worrying.

    Hope that clarifies things a little,
    ^ manveru

    > Thanks in advantage
    > Robert
     
    Michael Fellinger, May 17, 2008
    #3
  4. Robert Dober

    Marc Heiler Guest

    > But if you are frequenting rubyist circles then it shouldn't be any
    > problem to just rely on duck typing and stop worrying.


    Can a duck be dudified whilte it types strongly?
    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
     
    Marc Heiler, May 17, 2008
    #4
  5. Robert Dober

    ThoML Guest

    > Can a duck be dudified whilte it types strongly?

    This most likely depends on whether you know Stanley Kutype's film:
    "Dr. Strangeduck: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the
    Dude"
     
    ThoML, May 17, 2008
    #5
  6. On 17.05.2008 12:00, Marc Heiler wrote:
    >> But if you are frequenting rubyist circles then it shouldn't be any
    >> problem to just rely on duck typing and stop worrying.

    >
    > Can a duck be dudified whilte it types strongly?


    What is the sound of one duck typing?
     
    Robert Klemme, May 17, 2008
    #6
  7. [OT] Re: Dude?

    On 17.05.2008 09:10, Robert Dober wrote:
    > Dear native speakers
    >
    > I have been quite bothered with the usage of the word "dude" recently.
    > Not that I dislike the word itself but I feel it should be reserved to
    > friends using it in a quite informal context.
    > Am I wrong and do I have to adapt or is there some kind of agreement
    > with my POV?


    I would not use it on a regular basis - certainly not here. But then
    again, I am not a native speaker. :) It does feel a bit inappropriate
    but maybe that's just the age (my age, I mean). ;-)

    > Thanks in advantage


    Have you been watching some tennis recently? :)

    Kind regards

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, May 17, 2008
    #7
  8. On 17.05.2008 14:39, Phlip wrote:
    >> I have been quite bothered with the usage of the word "dude" recently.
    >> Not that I dislike the word itself but I feel it should be reserved to
    >> friends using it in a quite informal context.

    >
    > Dude comes from "dud", meaning fine clothes. Someone dressed up was "duddied
    > up", hence "doodied up". Confer "Howdy Doody". So the word "dude" came to
    > mean "a respectable urbane gentleman".
    >
    > It's not informal: That's what it means.


    Although it may well be the case that meaning has changed and / or
    people use it differently. For example, I was exposed to the term the
    first time in http://akas.imdb.com/title/tt0118715/ and picked up a
    slightly different meaning.

    >> Am I wrong and do I have to adapt or is there some kind of agreement
    >> with my POV?

    >
    > Yes, yes, and no. (-:
    >
    > Now go rail against non-native speakers of English using English-based chat
    > in forums that are not interactive enough to sustain acronyms like "smth" or
    > "no1"! I'm not sure, but I suspect some of them know English Chat better
    > than Standard English!


    Which was the standard again, do you have the ISO # handy? I can't seem
    to find it... :)

    Cheers

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, May 17, 2008
    #8
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    On May 17, 2008, at 2:40 PM, Robert Klemme wrote:

    > On 17.05.2008 12:00, Marc Heiler wrote:
    >>> But if you are frequenting rubyist circles then it shouldn't be any
    >>> problem to just rely on duck typing and stop worrying.

    >> Can a duck be dudified whilte it types strongly?

    >
    > What is the sound of one duck typing?
    >


    An what does the dude[1] himself think of all this?

    Regards,
    Florian Gilcher

    [1] http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0003518/
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    =Tm+z
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    Florian Gilcher, May 17, 2008
    #9
  10. Robert Dober

    ThoML Guest

    > Although it may well be the case that meaning has changed and / or
    > people use it differently. For example, I was exposed to the term the
    > first time inhttp://akas.imdb.com/title/tt0118715/and picked up a
    > slightly different meaning.


    More references to look up:
    http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/dude

    > The term dude is used to describe a friend, comrade, or an associate. It entered the mainstream from California surfer slang about 1970.
    > The word originated in New York City slang of ca 1883, referring to a fastidiously sharp dresser, what the late 18th century called a 'macaroni:'


    BTW I found it quite funny.
     
    ThoML, May 17, 2008
    #10
  11. On Saturday 17 May 2008, Florian Gilcher wrote:
    > On May 17, 2008, at 2:40 PM, Robert Klemme wrote:
    > > On 17.05.2008 12:00, Marc Heiler wrote:
    > >>> But if you are frequenting rubyist circles then it shouldn't be
    > >>> any problem to just rely on duck typing and stop worrying.
    > >>
    > >> Can a duck be dudified whilte it types strongly?

    > >
    > > What is the sound of one duck typing?

    >
    > An what does the dude[1] himself think of all this?


    > [1] http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0003518/


    "I do mind, the Dude minds. This will not stand, ya know, this
    aggression will not stand, man."

    Michael

    --
    Michael Schuerig
    mailto:
    http://www.schuerig.de/michael/
     
    Michael Schuerig, May 17, 2008
    #11
  12. Robert Dober

    Robert Dober Guest

    Lots of funny stuff, I still do not know about Dude, I guess I will
    just parse it but not output it I guess ;)
    Thx folks
     
    Robert Dober, May 17, 2008
    #12
  13. On 17.05.2008 15:19, ThoML wrote:
    >> Although it may well be the case that meaning has changed and / or
    >> people use it differently. For example, I was exposed to the term the
    >> first time inhttp://akas.imdb.com/title/tt0118715/and picked up a
    >> slightly different meaning.

    >
    > More references to look up:
    > http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/dude


    Thanks for that link! Loads of detail in there. I liked especially the
    sticker "Dude, where's my brain?" - I need to get me one. :)

    >> The term dude is used to describe a friend, comrade, or an associate. It entered the mainstream from California surfer slang about 1970.
    >> The word originated in New York City slang of ca 1883, referring to a fastidiously sharp dresser, what the late 18th century called a 'macaroni:'

    >
    > BTW I found it quite funny.


    Indeed. And I did a quick comparison and found that "dandy" is slightly
    older but at least partly covers the same semantics ("A man who is much
    concerned with his dress and appearance.").

    http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/dandy

    According to GF "dude" is much more common - at least on the web
    http://www.googlefight.com/index.php?lang=en_GB&word1=dude&word2=dandy

    Cheers

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, May 17, 2008
    #13
  14. On 17.05.2008 15:25, Phlip wrote:
    >> Although it may well be the case that meaning has changed and / or people
    >> use it differently. For example, I was exposed to the term the first time
    >> in http://akas.imdb.com/title/tt0118715/ and picked up a slightly
    >> different meaning.

    >
    > While a "lazy time-wasting slacker" might also entirely be a "respectable
    > urbane gentleman", in this case I think the movie directors are indulging in
    > "reclaiming the language". Like calling a bald guy "curly".


    You raise an interesting linguistic (or philosophical) question here:
    can someone who had curly hair but went bald be correctly attributed as
    "curly"? Maybe something for the next Ruby Quizz... :)

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, May 17, 2008
    #14
  15. Robert Klemme wrote:
    > On 17.05.2008 15:25, Phlip wrote:
    >>> Although it may well be the case that meaning has changed and / or
    >>> people use it differently. For example, I was exposed to the term
    >>> the first time in http://akas.imdb.com/title/tt0118715/ and picked up
    >>> a slightly different meaning.

    >>
    >> While a "lazy time-wasting slacker" might also entirely be a
    >> "respectable urbane gentleman", in this case I think the movie
    >> directors are indulging in "reclaiming the language". Like calling a
    >> bald guy "curly".

    >
    > You raise an interesting linguistic (or philosophical) question here:
    > can someone who had curly hair but went bald be correctly attributed as
    > "curly"? Maybe something for the next Ruby Quizz... :)


    Well ... the original "Curly" aka "Babe" Howard (Horowitz) had a full
    head of hair and shaved his head for the role. He might have become
    "naturally" bald later.
     
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, May 17, 2008
    #15
  16. On Sat, May 17, 2008 at 11:55 AM, Robert Klemme
    <> wrote:
    > On 17.05.2008 15:25, Phlip wrote:


    >> While a "lazy time-wasting slacker" might also entirely be a "respectable
    >> urbane gentleman", in this case I think the movie directors are indulging in
    >> "reclaiming the language". Like calling a bald guy "curly".

    >
    > You raise an interesting linguistic (or philosophical) question here: can
    > someone who had curly hair but went bald be correctly attributed as "curly"?


    Well, the person probably best known as Curly might not have been
    bald, but he also didn't have much hair:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curly_Howard

    Make me think of the old poem:

    Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear
    Fuzzy Wuzzy had no hair.
    Fuzzy Wuzzy wasn't Fuzzy!
    Wuzzy?

    --
    Rick DeNatale

    My blog on Ruby
    http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/
     
    Rick DeNatale, May 17, 2008
    #16
  17. Robert Dober

    Bill Kelly Guest

    From: "Robert Dober" <>
    >
    > Lots of funny stuff, I still do not know about Dude, I guess I will
    > just parse it but not output it I guess ;)


    Growing up in southern california, I heard "Dude" a lot. :)

    To my recollection it often took a form like:

    "....dude! you gotta see this!"

    or

    "..there were these dudes at the beach last night who
    had a whole stack of palettes and made a huge bonfire."

    also sometimes used in incredulity or dismay, such as in the
    case where someone unwittingly committed a giant faux pas,
    and/or upon hearing the telling of some particularly wild
    event:

    "...so rob threw the soup can, but his manager came around
    the corner right then and it clocked him right in the face!"

    "oh, duuude!"

    "yeah, he got a bloody nose and rob got fired..."


    Something like that :)


    Regards,

    Bill
     
    Bill Kelly, May 17, 2008
    #17
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    Robert Dober wrote:
    | Dear native speakers
    |
    | I have been quite bothered with the usage of the word "dude" recently.

    A good translation of 'dude' would be 'Kumpel'. A synonym something like
    'buddy' or 'pal'.

    - --
    Phillip Gawlowski
    Twitter: twitter.com/cynicalryan
    Blog: http://justarubyist.blogspot.com

    Localise input and output in subroutines.
    ~ - The Elements of Programming Style (Kernighan & Plaugher)
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    Phillip Gawlowski, May 17, 2008
    #18
  19. Robert Dober

    Robert Dober Guest

    On Sat, May 17, 2008 at 6:27 PM, Phillip Gawlowski
    <> wrote:
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Robert Dober wrote:
    > | Dear native speakers
    > |
    > | I have been quite bothered with the usage of the word "dude" recently.
    >
    > A good translation of 'dude' would be 'Kumpel'. A synonym something like
    > 'buddy' or 'pal'.


    It was quite what I thought, although I would be honored to be called
    dude by someone I have posted with for years now I dislike the idea of
    being called Dude by someone whom I barely know.

    I will put it this way, you should not call somebody dude unless you
    have herded sheep with her ;). (Comes from a French idiomatic sentence
    ).
    In future I will either undudiefy (spelling?) or ignore the post.
    R.


    --
    http://ruby-smalltalk.blogspot.com/

    ---
    Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein
     
    Robert Dober, May 17, 2008
    #19
  20. Robert Dober wrote:
    > I will put it this way, you should not call somebody dude unless you
    > have herded sheep with her ;).


    Or, since we're talking programmers, herded *cats* with her. :)
     
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, May 17, 2008
    #20
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