dynamic drop down menu...

Discussion in 'HTML' started by firstcustomer@gmail.com, Feb 20, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hi fellas,

    I need some help with something if you'd be so kind!

    I'm creating a knowledgebase site at my workplace, and I'm kinda
    limited as to resources (in terms of technology) because we are running
    Win2K. I don't have access to a web server for this, so its more or
    less just HTML and JavaScript.

    I'm wanting to do the following:

    There is a drop down menu, which loads up another drop down menu
    (preferably in the same page) depending on the answer.

    Let me demonstrate:

    The user is faced with a question:

    What OS is the customer using?
    * XP
    * Linux

    Now, when the user selects one, another question and drop down appears
    BELOW this, something like:

    Is it:
    * XP Pro
    * XP Home

    etc etc, until the users has answered sufficient questions to be able
    to give them a page detailing how to fix the problem.

    Also, it would be best if the drop downs are stored in different files,
    as there will be some cross references.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction?

    Btw, the drop dowen menu that I mean is just the normal, bog-standard
    HTML drop down menu (like in a form!).

    TIA, Neil
     
    , Feb 20, 2006
    #1
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  2. Andy Dingley Guest

    wrote:

    > I'm creating a knowledgebase site at my workplace, and I'm kinda
    > limited as to resources (in terms of technology) because we are running
    > Win2K. I don't have access to a web server for this,


    Get a web server, the easiest way might be to install Linux on an old
    PC and then run Apache and some Wiki or other. Every office has old
    retired PCs that can be re-used and the rest is free.

    Although I'm sure it's possible to do this under Win2K, it's just a
    waste of effort to attempt it.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 20, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    That really can't be done.

    The amount of red tape within my company is a joke.

    So, if you could explain to me how to do it in w2k standalone, that'd
    be great...

    --
    TIA, Neil.
     
    , Feb 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Jim Higson Guest

    wrote:

    > Hi fellas,
    >
    > I need some help with something if you'd be so kind!
    >
    > I'm creating a knowledgebase site at my workplace, and I'm kinda
    > limited as to resources (in terms of technology) because we are running
    > Win2K. I don't have access to a web server for this, so its more or
    > less just HTML and JavaScript.


    The Apache web server can run on Win2k. Also, IIS.
    Having said that, how expensive can a server for a small intranet really be?

    Probably much less than the cost of your time to produce a hackish solution
    in javascript, plus the cost to maintain this weird site that no-one will
    quite understand after you leave the company.

    Tell whoever's paying that if they want it done properly, a web site
    requires a web server.

    If you *must* do it as static pages, I'd recomend creating a dynamic site on
    your own box, then using a grab tool (such as wget) to grab a static
    version of the site.

    --
    Jim
     
    Jim Higson, Feb 20, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    There is a webserver for our massive Intranet, using Lotus Domino I
    beleive.

    Like I said previously, becasue of the amount of red tape in my
    company, it is not possible for me to use it.
     
    , Feb 20, 2006
    #5
  6. Jim Higson Guest

    wrote:

    > There is a webserver for our massive Intranet, using Lotus Domino I
    > beleive.
    >
    > Like I said previously, becasue of the amount of red tape in my
    > company, it is not possible for me to use it.


    Then it might not be possible for you to do the task you've been set, except
    for as a non-maintainable mess. Why not just tell them that, and then not
    do it if the red tape doesn't clear?

    This is akin to the boss asking a joiner to knock in nails, but not letting
    him use a hammer. Sure, you could knock them in with a rock, but if it
    really is that bad, you'd probably be better to just look for a new job.
     
    Jim Higson, Feb 20, 2006
    #6
  7. Jim Higson Guest

    wrote:

    > So, if you could explain to me how to do it in w2k standalone, that'd
    > be great...


    What does "w2k standalone" mean exactly?
    You mean without *any* web server software? In that case it cannot be done
    short of creating your own web server.
     
    Jim Higson, Feb 20, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    Quit right! Welcome to my world!

    The thing is, is that it is in my interests to do this!

    So, is there any help forthcoming?
    --
    Neil
     
    , Feb 20, 2006
    #8
  9. Guest

    Quite* right
     
    , Feb 20, 2006
    #9
  10. Jim Higson Guest

    wrote:

    > Quit right! Welcome to my world!
    >
    > The thing is, is that it is in my interests to do this!
    >
    > So, is there any help forthcoming?


    Well, if you're determined to bang nails in with a rock, what software do
    you have appart from Win2K? Does the Win2K box have any kind of webserver
    software?

    Are you allowed to install new software, such as Apache on the w2k box? How
    about on your workstation machine?

    Even static pages need a server.

    Jim
     
    Jim Higson, Feb 20, 2006
    #10
  11. >Then it might not be possible for you to do the task you've been set, except
    >for as a non-maintainable mess. Why not just tell them that, and then not
    >do it if the red tape doesn't clear?
    >
    >This is akin to the boss asking a joiner to knock in nails, but not letting
    >him use a hammer. Sure, you could knock them in with a rock, but if it
    >really is that bad, you'd probably be better to just look for a new job.


    More like using a golf club to drive in a masonry bolt. It might be possible
    in the theoretical sense but nobody has ever really got that to work. If
    said eejit boss thinks theres's a 1% chance it will work he'll simply think
    you're lazy if you don't try.

    "It can't be done" are probably the words you're grasping for. Tell him
    to call IBM Global Solutions and ask for a quote.

    --
    Need Mercedes parts ? - http://parts.mbz.org
    Richard Sexton | Mercedes stuff: http://mbz.org
    1970 280SE, 72 280SE | Home page: http://rs79.vrx.net
    633CSi 250SE/C 300SD | http://aquaria.net http://killi.net
     
    Richard Sexton, Feb 20, 2006
    #11
  12. Richard Sexton, Feb 20, 2006
    #12
  13. Guest

    IBM, in our case would be CSC - ARGH!
     
    , Feb 20, 2006
    #13
  14. Jim Higson Guest

    Richard Sexton wrote:

    >>Even static pages need a server.

    >
    > file://localhost/C:/
    >
    > not if they're local


    Fair enough. (although it could be argued that with the file 'protocol' the
    browser acts as the server).

    I suppose it *could* be done. I wouldn't want to be the one to update the
    HTML stored locally on every computer though. Kinda does away with the
    whole point of doing it as a web.
     
    Jim Higson, Feb 20, 2006
    #14
  15. Guest

    It would be stored on a network drive, so this shouldn't be an issue.
    --
    Neil
     
    , Feb 20, 2006
    #15
  16. Jose Guest

    > The user is faced with a question:
    >
    > What OS is the customer using?
    > * XP
    > * Linux
    >
    > Now, when the user selects one, another question and drop down appears
    > BELOW this, something like:
    >
    > Is it:
    > * XP Pro
    > * XP Home


    As a user I find this anane behaviour very annoying (both on web sites
    and in tax software). Give me the whole list at once - don't play
    twenty questions!

    What OS is the customer using?
    * XP Pro
    * XP Home
    * XP unknown edition
    * Windows 98 SE
    * WIndows 98 (original edition)
    * Windows 98 unknown edition
    * Linux (Red Hat)
    * Linux (SUSE)
    * Linux (KDE)
    * Mac OS X
    * Mac classic
    * DOS 3.1
    * DOS 4.0 (sorry, no support)
    * Northstar DOS
    * Commodore 64

    Granted, sometimes you really =do= need a tree of questions, but based
    on your example (and my experience with other software) most of the time
    it is a ten branced tree of two choices, rather than a two branced tree
    of ten choices.

    Jose
    --
    Money: what you need when you run out of brains.
    for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
     
    Jose, Feb 20, 2006
    #16
  17. In article <>,
    Jim Higson <> wrote:
    >Richard Sexton wrote:
    >
    >>>Even static pages need a server.

    >>
    >> file://localhost/C:/
    >>
    >> not if they're local

    >
    >Fair enough. (although it could be argued that with the file 'protocol' the
    >browser acts as the server).
    >
    >I suppose it *could* be done. I wouldn't want to be the one to update the
    >HTML stored locally on every computer though. Kinda does away with the
    >whole point of doing it as a web.


    Ironically, usenet news does this, the media you're using to say how
    hard it would be :) You can read news localy off of a distant NNTP
    host, it takes care of keeping all the local files up to date. So
    while it's a bit arcane you could install news software and let it
    do its thing and point DOCUMENT_ROOT to the news spool.

    Stop grimacing, I DID say it was arcane.



    --
    Need Mercedes parts ? - http://parts.mbz.org
    Richard Sexton | Mercedes stuff: http://mbz.org
    1970 280SE, 72 280SE | Home page: http://rs79.vrx.net
    633CSi 250SE/C 300SD | http://aquaria.net http://killi.net
     
    Richard Sexton, Feb 20, 2006
    #17
  18. Richard Sexton, Feb 20, 2006
    #18
  19. dorayme Guest

    In article
    <>,
    wrote:


    > I'm creating a knowledgebase site at my workplace, and I'm kinda
    > limited as to resources (in terms of technology) because we are running
    > Win2K. I don't have access to a web server for this, so its more or
    > less just HTML and JavaScript.
    >
    > I'm wanting to do the following:
    >
    > There is a drop down menu, which loads up another drop down menu
    > (preferably in the same page) depending on the answer.
    >
    > Let me demonstrate:
    >
    > The user is faced with a question:
    >
    > What OS is the customer using?
    > * XP
    > * Linux


    etc

    There would be many different ways to skin this cat in plain html
    (without javascript).

    Why not the simplest possible approach? "What OS is the customer
    using? is on one page. If XP is chosen, this is a link that takes
    you to a page with further questions.

    You have as many pages as is practical. You do not have to assume
    from this that you must put one alternative per page. This would
    be extremely irritating in fact! It is quite likely you can,
    without confusion at all, show a few routes on the same page. For
    example:

    Not necessarilly just:

    XP, Mac? (both links)

    but maybe

    XP Pro, XP Home, Mac pre X, Mac X .... (all links)

    How you organise and layout will be defined by the particular
    circumstances. You will put in as much on each page as will not
    cause confusion to the not-too-far-below-average-in-intelligence
    user

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Feb 20, 2006
    #19
  20. Andy Dingley Guest

    On 20 Feb 2006 03:10:26 -0800, wrote:

    >The amount of red tape within my company is a joke.


    Then move. Life's too short to spend it working for fools.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 20, 2006
    #20
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