Embedded systems and C programming

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Shalini, Sep 17, 2004.

  1. Shalini

    Shalini Guest

    Hi,
    Iam looking for some books which deal with Embedded software as well as
    C programming. I was suggested An Embedded software primer - David E
    Simon by a friend.
    Would like to have your feedback as well as some good book
    suggestions.

    Thanks,
    Shalini



    --
    Shalini
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Posted via http://www.codecomments.com
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
    Shalini, Sep 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Shalini wrote on 17/09/04 :
    > Iam looking for some books which deal with Embedded software as well as
    > C programming. I was suggested An Embedded software primer - David E
    > Simon by a friend.
    > Would like to have your feedback as well as some good book
    > suggestions.


    AFAIK, there is nothing special about C dealing with embedded software
    programming. Most of the code can be written in reusable standard C. As
    usual, the non standard code parts (system, direct I/O) should be
    isolated from the standard code to help porting (and debugging too, as
    a side effect).

    The only thing is that it is a usual practice to unit test the code on
    a hosted environment (like a PC under Windows or Linux). The tools are
    often more easy and fast to use. This is why easy porting is not an
    option! (The direct I/O can be simulated by some smart stub that
    display intersting information like address, register number,
    direction, values etc. A simple static variable can simulate a physical
    register)

    The group dedicated to embedded programming (not language specific) is:

    news:comp.arch.embedded

    --
    Emmanuel
    The C-FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/faq.html
    The C-library: http://www.dinkumware.com/refxc.html

    "C is a sharp tool"
     
    Emmanuel Delahaye, Sep 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 10:32:53 +0200, Emmanuel Delahaye
    <> wrote:
    <snip>
    > AFAIK, there is nothing special about C dealing with embedded software
    > programming. Most of the code can be written in reusable standard C. <snip>
    > The only thing is that it is a usual practice to unit test the code on
    > a hosted environment (like a PC under Windows or Linux). The tools are
    > often more easy and fast to use. This is why easy porting is not an
    > option! (The direct I/O can be simulated <snip>


    Minor point of English usage: at least in US "not an option" means
    "not possible; prohibited". (Perhaps most famously in the cliched
    exhortation of sports coaches and other "leaders" that "failure is not
    an option", meaning "I don't allow you to give up".) I'm certain what
    M. Delahaye wanted is "not optional", which although formally
    ambiguous conventionally means "required; mandatory".

    - David.Thompson1 at worldnet.att.net
     
    Dave Thompson, Sep 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Shalini

    Dan Pop Guest

    In <> Emmanuel Delahaye <> writes:

    >Shalini wrote on 17/09/04 :
    >> Iam looking for some books which deal with Embedded software as well as
    >> C programming. I was suggested An Embedded software primer - David E
    >> Simon by a friend.
    >> Would like to have your feedback as well as some good book
    >> suggestions.

    >
    >AFAIK, there is nothing special about C dealing with embedded software
    >programming. Most of the code can be written in reusable standard C. As
    >usual, the non standard code parts (system, direct I/O) should be
    >isolated from the standard code to help porting (and debugging too, as
    >a side effect).


    What library facilities are guaranteed by the C standard for freestanding
    implementations?

    Dan
    --
    Dan Pop
    DESY Zeuthen, RZ group
    Email:
    Currently looking for a job in the European Union
     
    Dan Pop, Sep 27, 2004
    #4
  5. Shalini

    kyle york Guest

    Greetings,

    Dan Pop wrote:
    > In <> Emmanuel Delahaye <> writes:
    >
    >
    > What library facilities are guaranteed by the C standard for freestanding
    > implementations?
    >


    Assuming by facilities you mean functions and not library management,
    from this:

    4.6: A conforming freestanding implementation shall accept any stricky
    conforming program that does not use complex types and in which the use
    of the features specified in the library clause (clause 7) is confined
    to the contents of the standard headers <float.h>, <iso646.h>,
    <limits.h>, <stdarg.h>, <stdbool.h>, <stddef.h>, and <stdint.h>

    I gather a freestanding implementation needs *no* library functions.


    --
    Kyle A. York
    Sr. Subordinate Grunt, SC
     
    kyle york, Sep 27, 2004
    #5
  6. Shalini

    Dan Pop Guest

    In <1096300731.372947@sj-nntpcache-3> kyle york <> writes:

    >Dan Pop wrote:
    >>
    >> What library facilities are guaranteed by the C standard for freestanding
    >> implementations?

    >
    >Assuming by facilities you mean functions and not library management,
    >from this:


    It was a rhetorical question.

    >I gather a freestanding implementation needs *no* library functions.


    That's my point: they do need standard library functions (and most of
    them provide them), but the standard guarantees the existence and
    semantics of none, so writing portable code (i.e. code that relies
    exclusively on features guaranteed by the standard) is not as easy as
    Emmanuel claims.

    It's easier in practice, because the implementors go beyond the
    strict requirements of the C standard, but this doesn't count as
    *portable* programming in the context of c.l.c.

    Dan
    --
    Dan Pop
    DESY Zeuthen, RZ group
    Email:
    Currently looking for a job in the European Union
     
    Dan Pop, Sep 27, 2004
    #6
  7. Shalini

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <1095468278.F+7Aeo7f4UPbdHf0VAwpjw@tng>, Shalini <Shalini.1cr
    > writes
    >
    >Hi,
    >Iam looking for some books which deal with Embedded software as well as
    >C programming. I was suggested An Embedded software primer - David E
    >Simon by a friend.
    >Would like to have your feedback as well as some good book
    >suggestions.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Shalini



    www.accu.org

    See the book revues section. there is a section on embedded.

    /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/\
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris Hills, Oct 8, 2004
    #7
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