Examples of high-quality python code?

Discussion in 'Python' started by kaens, May 31, 2007.

  1. kaens

    kaens Guest

    Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
    to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.

    Needless to say, I was quite pleased.

    Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
    that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.

    Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
    enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
    code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
    point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
    that are examples of great python code.

    I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
    randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
    techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.

    So, who wants to hook me up?
    kaens, May 31, 2007
    #1
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  2. kaens

    Larry Bates Guest

    kaens wrote:
    > Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
    > to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.
    >
    > Needless to say, I was quite pleased.
    >
    > Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
    > that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.
    >
    > Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
    > enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
    > code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
    > point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
    > that are examples of great python code.
    >
    > I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
    > randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
    > techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.
    >
    > So, who wants to hook me up?


    You should consider picking up a copy of Python Cookbook. Alex and
    others have reviewed the code it contains and IMHO it is well written.

    I've also learned quite a lot from:

    Python on Win32 (book by Mark Hammond/Andy Robinson)
    Reading source code to standard library
    Reading ReportLab source (www.reportlab.org)
    Reading PIL source (www.effbot.org)
    Reading wxPython source (www.wxpython.org)
    Monitoring this list on a daily basis

    -Larry
    Larry Bates, May 31, 2007
    #2
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  3. kaens

    Guest

    On May 31, 8:38 am, Larry Bates <> wrote:
    > kaens wrote:
    > > Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
    > > to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.

    >
    > > Needless to say, I was quite pleased.

    >
    > > Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
    > > that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.

    >
    > > Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
    > > enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
    > > code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
    > > point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
    > > that are examples of great python code.

    >
    > > I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
    > > randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
    > > techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.

    >
    > > So, who wants to hook me up?

    >
    > You should consider picking up a copy of Python Cookbook. Alex and
    > others have reviewed the code it contains and IMHO it is well written.
    >
    > I've also learned quite a lot from:
    >
    > Python on Win32 (book by Mark Hammond/Andy Robinson)
    > Reading source code to standard library
    > Reading ReportLab source (www.reportlab.org)
    > Reading PIL source (www.effbot.org)
    > Reading wxPython source (www.wxpython.org)
    > Monitoring this list on a daily basis
    >
    > -Larry


    Also "Python Programming" by Lutz has some great code to learn from as
    it also explains most of it.

    Mike
    , May 31, 2007
    #3
  4. kaens

    kaens Guest

    On 31 May 2007 06:58:36 -0700, <> wrote:
    > On May 31, 8:38 am, Larry Bates <> wrote:
    > > kaens wrote:
    > > > Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
    > > > to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.

    > >
    > > > Needless to say, I was quite pleased.

    > >
    > > > Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
    > > > that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.

    > >
    > > > Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
    > > > enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
    > > > code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
    > > > point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
    > > > that are examples of great python code.

    > >
    > > > I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
    > > > randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
    > > > techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.

    > >
    > > > So, who wants to hook me up?

    > >
    > > You should consider picking up a copy of Python Cookbook. Alex and
    > > others have reviewed the code it contains and IMHO it is well written.
    > >
    > > I've also learned quite a lot from:
    > >
    > > Python on Win32 (book by Mark Hammond/Andy Robinson)
    > > Reading source code to standard library
    > > Reading ReportLab source (www.reportlab.org)
    > > Reading PIL source (www.effbot.org)
    > > Reading wxPython source (www.wxpython.org)
    > > Monitoring this list on a daily basis
    > >
    > > -Larry

    >
    > Also "Python Programming" by Lutz has some great code to learn from as
    > it also explains most of it.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    > --
    > http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >


    Thanks for the replies everyone - I don't have the spare cash to buy a
    book right now, but I've started studying the standard library, and I
    do monitor this list on a regular basis.
    kaens, Jun 2, 2007
    #4
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