Excel file read/write?

Discussion in 'Python' started by Podi, Nov 10, 2006.

  1. Podi

    Podi Guest

    As far as I know, there is pyXLWriter for writing and xlrd for reading.
    Is there such thing so that one can open an Excel file into memory and
    read/update any sheet/cell on the fly. One analogy to this is the
    ConfigParser module.

    Any info would be much appreciated.
    Podi, Nov 10, 2006
    #1
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  2. Podi

    John Machin Guest

    Podi wrote:
    > As far as I know, there is pyXLWriter for writing and xlrd for reading.


    Most folk would seem to be using pyExcelerator rather than pyXLWriter.
    It is much more up to date, it just hasn't been worked on for a year,
    whereas pyXLWriter is obsolete (doesn't write latest Excel file format)
    and is deliberately/officially in Norwegian Blue Parrot emulation mode.

    > Is there such thing so that one can open an Excel file into memory and
    > read/update any sheet/cell on the fly. One analogy to this is the
    > ConfigParser module.


    There is no pure Python platform-independent facility that requires no
    other software to be installed. Your choices are:

    1. Python COM interface (part of
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/pywin32/) with lots of users (and hence
    readily available help in this newsgroup), examples, etc -- but
    requires (a) Windows OS (b) Microsoft Excel

    2. OpenOffice.org has a built-in Python -- 2.n where n is a small
    number :-( and almost impenetrable documentation -- Sybren Stuvel has
    published some examples: http://www.stuvel.eu/ooo-python
    but my guess is that all the users of the OOo interface could fit in a
    taxi.

    3. Gnumeric is rumoured to have a similar scripting facility.
    John Machin, Nov 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. Podi

    Podi Guest

    Thanks for the reply.

    >
    > Most folk would seem to be using pyExcelerator rather than pyXLWriter.
    > It is much more up to date, it just hasn't been worked on for a year,


    I will give it a shot.

    > 1. Python COM interface (part of
    > http://sourceforge.net/projects/pywin32/) with lots of users (and hence
    > readily available help in this newsgroup), examples, etc -- but
    > requires (a) Windows OS (b) Microsoft Excel


    I am not into COM as it is kind of anti-intuitive, at least to me.

    >
    > 2. OpenOffice.org has a built-in Python -- 2.n where n is a small
    > number :-( and almost impenetrable documentation -- Sybren Stuvel has
    > published some examples: http://www.stuvel.eu/ooo-python
    > but my guess is that all the users of the OOo interface could fit in a
    > taxi.


    Hmmm..., I have 2.4.2 and would not like to down grade myself.

    >
    > 3. Gnumeric is rumoured to have a similar scripting facility.


    Well, I would like to stick with the MS crowd, at least for the moment.

    Cheers!
    P
    Podi, Nov 10, 2006
    #3
  4. Podi

    John Machin Guest

    Podi wrote:

    >
    > >
    > > 2. OpenOffice.org has a built-in Python -- 2.n where n is a small
    > > number :-( and almost impenetrable documentation -- Sybren Stuvel has
    > > published some examples: http://www.stuvel.eu/ooo-python
    > > but my guess is that all the users of the OOo interface could fit in a
    > > taxi.

    >
    > Hmmm..., I have 2.4.2 and would not like to down grade myself.


    It is a separate installation of Python, somewhere in the OOo directory
    hierarchy. You would have to "down grade" yourself only when working
    with OOo. In any case the documentation and the size of the user base
    are showstoppers IMHO.

    Cheers,
    John
    John Machin, Nov 10, 2006
    #4
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