exit codes

Discussion in 'C++' started by Gégé, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. Gégé

    Gégé Guest

    Hi all,

    I'd like to know the meaning of this exit code :
    ( c++ program compiled with vc++)

    "Exit Code -1073741819."

    Is there a table for exit codes ?

    Thanks
    G
    Gégé, Nov 13, 2008
    #1
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  2. Gégé

    Tim Love Guest

    =?ISO-8859-1?B?R+ln6Q==?= <> writes:

    >Hi all,


    >I'd like to know the meaning of this exit code :
    >( c++ program compiled with vc++)


    >"Exit Code -1073741819."


    >Is there a table for exit codes ?


    Sometimes - sysexits.h is on some systems for example, and <stdlib> should,
    I think, have a little table - but it might be better to look at the
    program's doc and source.
    Tim Love, Nov 13, 2008
    #2
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  3. Gégé

    James Kanze Guest

    On Nov 13, 9:11 am, Gégé <> wrote:
    > I'd like to know the meaning of this exit code :
    > ( c++ program compiled with vc++)


    > "Exit Code -1073741819."


    The conventions depend on the system, and the actual exit code
    depends on the program which exited. All the standard says is
    that 0 and EXIT_SUCCESS will map to something the system will
    understand as success, and that EXIT_FAILURE will map to
    something the system understands as failure. Most systems have
    more complete conventions, however, some of which may require
    actual mapping. (On at least one system, even codes meant
    failure, and odd success---the C/C++ runtime library had to map
    0 to some other odd number.)

    As a simply example, the Unix conventions are that if the value
    returned by the application (when returning from main, or
    calling exit) is 0, modulo 256, it is success, and all other
    values are failure. But that convention is not universally used
    by all Unix applications: grep, for example, will return 1 if
    there is no match, and 2 for failure. (Depending on what you
    are doing, no match may or may not be considered a failure).
    And if the program is terminated by a signal (segment violation,
    for example), the shell will simulate an exit code of the signal
    number + 128 (which means that well behaved applications will
    not return exit codes greater than 127).

    I'm far less familiar with Windows, but I think it returns the
    value without mapping (as opposed to the modulo 256 which Unix
    uses); I'm also unsure of what it does if the process was
    terminated. There's also a possibility that the program was
    generated with a pre-standard compiler, and simply fell off the
    end of main, effectively generating a random exit code. (The
    C++ standard requires an exit code of 0 in such cases, but C
    doesn't, and pre-standard C++ compilers likely won't guarantee 0
    either.)

    > Is there a table for exit codes ?


    There should be one in the documentation of the program which
    generated it. You might want to check out the system
    documentation as well, in order to know what the general
    conventions are.

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
    James Kanze, Nov 13, 2008
    #3
  4. Gégé

    Rolf Magnus Guest

    James Kanze wrote:

    > I'm far less familiar with Windows, but I think it returns the
    > value without mapping (as opposed to the modulo 256 which Unix
    > uses); I'm also unsure of what it does if the process was
    > terminated. There's also a possibility that the program was
    > generated with a pre-standard compiler, and simply fell off the
    > end of main, effectively generating a random exit code. (The
    > C++ standard requires an exit code of 0 in such cases, but C
    > doesn't, and pre-standard C++ compilers likely won't guarantee 0
    > either.)


    Well, that is - if main's return type was int. I'm not sure what compilers
    do if you define it (illegally) as void. Most compilers do allow it, but I
    don't know what return value you'll get in such a case.
    Rolf Magnus, Nov 13, 2008
    #4
  5. Gégé

    Gégé Guest

    Hi all

    This error was due to a recursive function that reached the recursion
    threshold.
    I changed my function to an iterative one, now it works fine.

    Thank you all for your comments

    Regards
    G
    Gégé, Nov 13, 2008
    #5
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