explainations about standard library and modules in Python.

Discussion in 'Python' started by Hung ho, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Hung ho

    Hung ho Guest

    Hi.
    I just finished reading an introductory Python book called "Python Programming for the absolute beginner" by Michael Dawson. I found it very interesting, and easy to follow. Python does really look similar to C/C++ and Java. In the book, the author imported other modules that were from the standard library of Python. I tried reading some of the modules in the standard library in Python's Lib folder. I'm just a beginner to Python, and didn't understand anything in any of the modules.
    My question is that, can anyone recommend me any book, or online materials that could explain what the functions some of the modules in the standard library can do that are packaged along with Python v. 2.3.4?. For example, I read some modules such as os.py, sys.py, and random.py The documents in those modules didn't help me to comprehend what the purpose of the modules, and how to use them in Python. What are their functions, and how do I use them.
    Thank You.
    Hung ho, Sep 2, 2004
    #1
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  2. Hung ho

    Peter Hansen Guest

    Hung ho wrote:

    > My question is that, can anyone recommend me any book, or online materials that
    > could explain what the functions some of the modules in the standard
    > library can do that are packaged along with Python v. 2.3.4?. For
    > example, I read some modules such as os.py, sys.py, and random.py
    > The documents in those modules didn't help me to comprehend what
    > the purpose of the modules, and how to use them in Python.


    No beginner is expected to read the source code itself to figure
    things out. Go to the online documentation at http://docs.python.org
    and browse through it. Make sure you read the tutorial, but if
    you have questions about specific modules, go to the Global Module
    Index.

    For example, read the first sentence of each of these two learn the
    purpose of the modules you mentioned:

    http://docs.python.org/lib/module-sys.html
    http://docs.python.org/lib/module-os.html
    http://docs.python.org/lib/module-random.html

    -Peter
    Peter Hansen, Sep 2, 2004
    #2
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  3. Hung ho

    Trent Mick Guest

    [Hung ho wrote]
    > My question is that, can anyone recommend me any book, or online
    > materials that could explain what the functions some of the modules in
    > the standard library can do that are packaged along with Python v.
    > 2.3.4?. For example, I read some modules such as os.py, sys.py, and
    > random.py The documents in those modules didn't help me to comprehend
    > what the purpose of the modules, and how to use them in Python. What
    > are their functions, and how do I use them. Thank You.


    http://docs.python.org/lib/lib.html

    Specifically:
    http://docs.python.org/lib/module-os.html
    http://docs.python.org/lib/module-sys.html
    http://docs.python.org/lib/module-random.html

    Cheers,
    Trent

    --
    Trent Mick
    Trent Mick, Sep 2, 2004
    #3
  4. Hung ho wrote:
    > Hi.
    > I just finished reading an introductory Python book called "Python Programming for the absolute beginner" by Michael Dawson. I found it very interesting, and easy to follow. Python does really look similar to C/C++ and Java. In the book, the author imported other modules that were from the standard library of Python. I tried reading some of the modules in the standard library in Python's Lib folder. I'm just a beginner to Python, and didn't understand anything in any of the modules.
    > My question is that, can anyone recommend me any book, or online materials that could explain what the functions some of the modules in the standard library can do that are packaged along with Python v. 2.3.4?. For example, I read some modules such as os.py, sys.py, and random.py The documents in those modules didn't help me to comprehend what the purpose of the modules, and how to use them in Python. What are their functions, and how do I use them.
    > Thank You.


    For someone who has previous programming experience, Alex Martelli's
    Python in a Nutshell is an excellent reference.

    Colin W.
    Colin J. Williams, Sep 2, 2004
    #4
  5. Hung ho

    Porky Pig Jr Guest

    "Hung ho" <hung > wrote in message news:<URJZc.172448$>...
    > My question is that, can anyone recommend me any book, or online
    > materials that could explain what the functions some of the modules in
    > the standard library can do that are packaged along with Python v.
    > 2.3.4?. For example, I read some modules such as os.py, sys.py, and
    > random.py The documents in those modules didn't help me to comprehend
    > what the purpose of the modules, and how to use them in Python. What are
    > their functions, and how do I use them.
    > Thank You.


    Python in a Nutshell has a nice concise converage of key functions of
    a built-in modules including both os.py and sys.py. 'Programming
    Python' goes into greater details, gives lots of coding examples.

    I agree on-line information you can retrieve with 'help' can be rather
    confusing. Doing something like

    help(random)

    got me lost in the forest, not seeing the trees. Once again, Python in
    a Nutshell has a nice page on random module with a list and short
    explanation of key functions. Granted, it mostly duplicates the staff
    from help(random), but it lists only those you really need to know to
    start using random.
    Porky Pig Jr, Sep 3, 2004
    #5
  6. Hung ho said unto the world upon 2004-09-02 14:44:
    > Hi. I just finished reading an introductory Python book called "Python
    > Programming for the absolute beginner" by Michael Dawson. I found it
    > very interesting, and easy to follow. Python does really look similar
    > to C/C++ and Java. In the book, the author imported other modules that
    > were from the standard library of Python. I tried reading some of the
    > modules in the standard library in Python's Lib folder. I'm just a
    > beginner to Python, and didn't understand anything in any of the
    > modules. My question is that, can anyone recommend me any book, or
    > online materials that could explain what the functions some of the
    > modules in the standard library can do that are packaged along with
    > Python v. 2.3.4?. For example, I read some modules such as os.py,
    > sys.py, and random.py The documents in those modules didn't help me to
    > comprehend what the purpose of the modules, and how to use them in
    > Python. What are their functions, and how do I use them. Thank You.


    Hi,

    I am a relative newcomer to Python and programming both.

    You've already been pointed to Python in a Nutshell. I'll add my voice to
    that.

    I'd also suggest The Python Standard library by Lundh. There is an
    O'Reilly dead-tree <http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/pythonsl/> and a free
    version at <http://effbot.org/zone/librarybook-index.htm>. It is a bit out
    of date (IIRC it is geared to Python 2.0), but it has been helpful to me
    nevertheless.

    Between the docs, the Nutshell book and the Lundh, the helpful people on
    the tutor list have been spared many posts from me ;-)

    Best,

    Brian vdB
    Brian van den Broek, Sep 3, 2004
    #6
  7. Colin J. Williams <> wrote:
    ...
    > > My question is that, can anyone recommend me any book, or online

    materials that could explain what the functions some of the modules in
    the standard library can do that are packaged along with Python v.
    2.3.4?. For
    ...
    > For someone who has previous programming experience, Alex Martelli's
    > Python in a Nutshell is an excellent reference.


    Thanks Colin, your usual agent's fee will be forthcoming of course (now
    wouldn't be funny if I mistakenly posted this to the whole list instead
    of privately to you, ha ha, no chance of course I'd so such a mistake!).


    Alex
    Alex Martelli, Sep 4, 2004
    #7
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