Find number of legs on a farm...

Discussion in 'C++' started by Petrakid, Oct 10, 2006.

  1. Petrakid

    Petrakid Guest

    Hey, I have a task to complete. I am trying to figure out the best
    way, in C++ to determine the following. There is this farm with pigs
    and chickens. Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    same, so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and how
    many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs of the
    two.

    - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3
    - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8
    - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs

    I need to figure out the total number of possibilities ( like there are
    300 different possibilities) AND list the possibilities at the users
    request (8 pigs and 3 chicken or 600 pigs and 89 chickens, etc).

    I CANNOT use arrays or the exact chinese remainder theorem (i can use a
    variation of it).

    this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer. I'm having
    the most trouble with the calculation steps.

    I've already determined that there will be 2 calculation functions,
    though if it can be done with 1 calculation function, that's great.

    If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!
    Petrakid, Oct 10, 2006
    #1
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  2. * Petrakid:
    >
    > this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer.


    Good.

    Hth.,

    - Alf

    --
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
    Alf P. Steinbach, Oct 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. Petrakid wrote:
    > Hey, I have a task to complete. I am trying to figure out the best
    > way, in C++ to determine the following. There is this farm with pigs
    > and chickens. Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    > same, so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and
    > how many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs
    > of the two.
    >
    > - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3
    > - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8
    > - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs
    >
    > I need to figure out the total number of possibilities ( like there
    > are 300 different possibilities) AND list the possibilities at the
    > users request (8 pigs and 3 chicken or 600 pigs and 89 chickens, etc).
    >
    > I CANNOT use arrays or the exact chinese remainder theorem (i can use
    > a variation of it).
    >
    > this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer. I'm
    > having the most trouble with the calculation steps.
    >
    > I've already determined that there will be 2 calculation functions,
    > though if it can be done with 1 calculation function, that's great.
    >
    > If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!


    Well, you have the number of legs, right? You need to figure out
    all solutions of

    x*3*2 + y*8*4 = N

    where 'N' is the number of legs and 'x' and 'y' is the number of
    groups of chickens and pigs, respectively. Then you multiply the
    'x' by 3 and you get the number of chickens. And my multiplying
    'y' by 8 you get the number of pigs.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
    Victor Bazarov, Oct 10, 2006
    #3
  4. Petrakid posted:

    > There is this farm with pigs
    > and chickens.



    Cool, I like pigs and chickens.


    > Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    > same,



    Extrememly ambiguous statment.


    > so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and how
    > many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs of the
    > two.
    >
    > - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3



    That's 6 legs per group then no?


    > - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8



    That's 32 legs per group, no?


    > - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs



    OH MY GOD ARE YOU SERIOUS?


    > If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!



    If there are 192 legs, then there could be:

    (1) Thirty-two groups of chickens, zero groups of pigs.
    (2) Six groups of pigs, zero groups of chickens.

    Here's how _I_ would go about it:

    Start off with the original figure like "92 legs".

    (1) Subtract 32 from it.
    (2) See if the result % 6 is false.
    (3) If so, you have a combination.
    (4) Repeat until result < 32

    Then do it with 6:

    (1) Subtract 6 from it.
    (2) See if the result % 32 is false.
    (3) If so, you have a combination.
    (4) Repeat until result < 6.

    Something along those lines in anyway.

    --

    Frederick Gotham
    Frederick Gotham, Oct 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Petrakid

    Petrakid Guest

    Thanks for the help I'll start plugging in the calculations tonight.
    Yeah, yeah I had to make sure everyone understood that the pigs and
    chickens aren't deformed or genetically modified in any way!!

    Any further ideas are still welcome!

    Petrakid wrote:
    > Hey, I have a task to complete. I am trying to figure out the best
    > way, in C++ to determine the following. There is this farm with pigs
    > and chickens. Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    > same, so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and how
    > many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs of the
    > two.
    >
    > - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3
    > - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8
    > - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs
    >
    > I need to figure out the total number of possibilities ( like there are
    > 300 different possibilities) AND list the possibilities at the users
    > request (8 pigs and 3 chicken or 600 pigs and 89 chickens, etc).
    >
    > I CANNOT use arrays or the exact chinese remainder theorem (i can use a
    > variation of it).
    >
    > this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer. I'm having
    > the most trouble with the calculation steps.
    >
    > I've already determined that there will be 2 calculation functions,
    > though if it can be done with 1 calculation function, that's great.
    >
    > If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!
    Petrakid, Oct 10, 2006
    #5
  6. Petrakid

    Jim Langston Guest

    "Petrakid" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the help I'll start plugging in the calculations tonight.
    > Yeah, yeah I had to make sure everyone understood that the pigs and
    > chickens aren't deformed or genetically modified in any way!!


    I once met a farmer who had chickens with three legs. I asked what the heck
    these were, he said him, ma and his son all liked chiken legs so they
    developed a breed with three legs. I asked him how they tasted. He said he
    didn't know, wasn't able to catch one yet.

    >
    > Any further ideas are still welcome!
    >
    > Petrakid wrote:
    >> Hey, I have a task to complete. I am trying to figure out the best
    >> way, in C++ to determine the following. There is this farm with pigs
    >> and chickens. Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    >> same, so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and how
    >> many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs of the
    >> two.
    >>
    >> - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3
    >> - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8
    >> - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs
    >>
    >> I need to figure out the total number of possibilities ( like there are
    >> 300 different possibilities) AND list the possibilities at the users
    >> request (8 pigs and 3 chicken or 600 pigs and 89 chickens, etc).
    >>
    >> I CANNOT use arrays or the exact chinese remainder theorem (i can use a
    >> variation of it).
    >>
    >> this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer. I'm having
    >> the most trouble with the calculation steps.
    >>
    >> I've already determined that there will be 2 calculation functions,
    >> though if it can be done with 1 calculation function, that's great.
    >>
    >> If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!

    >
    Jim Langston, Oct 10, 2006
    #6
  7. Petrakid

    Kevin Handy Guest

    Petrakid wrote:
    > Hey, I have a task to complete. I am trying to figure out the best
    > way, in C++ to determine the following. There is this farm with pigs
    > and chickens. Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    > same, so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and how


    How short is this person, that he can't see over the top of a chicken?
    Or are these those strange KFC critters?

    > many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs of the
    > two.
    >
    > - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3
    > - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8
    > - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs


    What about the "he was too good to eat all at once" thing?

    Are you really ruling out KFC chickens? Then your guy must be really
    really short.

    > I need to figure out the total number of possibilities ( like there are
    > 300 different possibilities) AND list the possibilities at the users
    > request (8 pigs and 3 chicken or 600 pigs and 89 chickens, etc).
    >
    > I CANNOT use arrays or the exact chinese remainder theorem (i can use a
    > variation of it).


    What is the "chinese remainder theorem"?

    > this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer. I'm having
    > the most trouble with the calculation steps.


    Don't worry about individual critters. Handle them as
    a '3-chicken' with 6 legs, or a '8-pig' with 32 legs.
    Then just loop through all possible 8-pigs, and see if
    the remainder fits as a 3-chicken (no left over legs,
    which would get messy).

    > I've already determined that there will be 2 calculation functions,
    > though if it can be done with 1 calculation function, that's great.
    >
    > If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!
    >


    You should then target the e-mail at 'yo', whoever he is.

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    Kevin Handy, Oct 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Petrakid

    Petrakid Guest

    Alright, now if I wanted to do this as a range (say numbers between
    500-1000), what would I do? Sorry to ask these things, but the
    instructor tends to be pretty vague when it comes to this stuff, and
    i'm using any resource i can to find help

    Thanks

    Petrakid wrote:
    > Hey, I have a task to complete. I am trying to figure out the best
    > way, in C++ to determine the following. There is this farm with pigs
    > and chickens. Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    > same, so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and how
    > many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs of the
    > two.
    >
    > - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3
    > - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8
    > - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs
    >
    > I need to figure out the total number of possibilities ( like there are
    > 300 different possibilities) AND list the possibilities at the users
    > request (8 pigs and 3 chicken or 600 pigs and 89 chickens, etc).
    >
    > I CANNOT use arrays or the exact chinese remainder theorem (i can use a
    > variation of it).
    >
    > this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer. I'm having
    > the most trouble with the calculation steps.
    >
    > I've already determined that there will be 2 calculation functions,
    > though if it can be done with 1 calculation function, that's great.
    >
    > If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!
    Petrakid, Oct 11, 2006
    #8
  9. Petrakid

    osmium Guest

    "Petrakid" writes:

    > Alright, now if I wanted to do this as a range (say numbers between
    > 500-1000), what would I do? Sorry to ask these things, but the
    > instructor tends to be pretty vague when it comes to this stuff, and
    > i'm using any resource i can to find help


    I assume "this" means you want the user to enter numbers only in the range
    300-500. If the user enters a number outside of that range, tell him the
    rules (again, perhaps) and tell him to re-enter the number. Note that the
    valid entries always take the form:

    n = 6c + 32 p
    where c is the number of groups of chickens and p is the number of groups
    of pigs.
    osmium, Oct 11, 2006
    #9
  10. Petrakid

    Petrakid Guest

    Not necessarily. The range should be kept limited to keep the
    processor from going crazy, but there is no limit to the range in the
    program - just in the instructions.

    Regardless, i'm assuming that the same formula n = 6c + 32p still
    stands.


    osmium wrote:
    > "Petrakid" writes:
    >
    > > Alright, now if I wanted to do this as a range (say numbers between
    > > 500-1000), what would I do? Sorry to ask these things, but the
    > > instructor tends to be pretty vague when it comes to this stuff, and
    > > i'm using any resource i can to find help

    >
    > I assume "this" means you want the user to enter numbers only in the range
    > 300-500. If the user enters a number outside of that range, tell him the
    > rules (again, perhaps) and tell him to re-enter the number. Note that the
    > valid entries always take the form:
    >
    > n = 6c + 32 p
    > where c is the number of groups of chickens and p is the number of groups
    > of pigs.
    Petrakid, Oct 11, 2006
    #10
  11. Petrakid

    Petrakid Guest

    Got that part and yes these chicken are VERY BIG KFC chicken - they can
    kill!!

    Check out
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp...45d26d5f539/b6b5d26831cce7e2#b6b5d26831cce7e2

    to see where I'm at now.j

    Thanks!!

    Kevin Handy wrote:
    > Petrakid wrote:
    > > Hey, I have a task to complete. I am trying to figure out the best
    > > way, in C++ to determine the following. There is this farm with pigs
    > > and chickens. Only the legs of the pigs and chickens look exactly the
    > > same, so for a short person to determine how many possible pigs and how

    >
    > How short is this person, that he can't see over the top of a chicken?
    > Or are these those strange KFC critters?
    >
    > > many possible chickens, all they can do is count the total legs of the
    > > two.
    > >
    > > - Chickens seem to always run around in groups of 3
    > > - Pigs seem to always clump together in groups of 8
    > > - pigs ALWAYS have 4 legs and chickens ALWAYS have 2 legs

    >
    > What about the "he was too good to eat all at once" thing?
    >
    > Are you really ruling out KFC chickens? Then your guy must be really
    > really short.
    >
    > > I need to figure out the total number of possibilities ( like there are
    > > 300 different possibilities) AND list the possibilities at the users
    > > request (8 pigs and 3 chicken or 600 pigs and 89 chickens, etc).
    > >
    > > I CANNOT use arrays or the exact chinese remainder theorem (i can use a
    > > variation of it).

    >
    > What is the "chinese remainder theorem"?
    >
    > > this is an assignment, so I don't need the complete answer. I'm having
    > > the most trouble with the calculation steps.

    >
    > Don't worry about individual critters. Handle them as
    > a '3-chicken' with 6 legs, or a '8-pig' with 32 legs.
    > Then just loop through all possible 8-pigs, and see if
    > the remainder fits as a 3-chicken (no left over legs,
    > which would get messy).
    >
    > > I've already determined that there will be 2 calculation functions,
    > > though if it can be done with 1 calculation function, that's great.
    > >
    > > If yo could help me out, I would appreciate it!!!!!
    > >

    >
    > You should then target the e-mail at 'yo', whoever he is.
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
    Petrakid, Oct 12, 2006
    #11
  12. Petrakid

    Duane Hebert Guest

    "Kevin Handy" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Petrakid wrote:
    > What is the "chinese remainder theorem"?

    http://www.cut-the-knot.org/blue/chinese.shtml
    oddly enough...

    >
    > You should then target the e-mail at 'yo', whoever he is.


    can't argue with that.

    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
    > News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
    > Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
    > =----
    Duane Hebert, Oct 12, 2006
    #12
  13. Petrakid

    Petrakid Guest

    It wasn't me who asked that - I know what the theorem is - i just can't
    use it...directly...in the program.

    I got the program printing out numbers now, and printing out the total
    of possible solutions, but the solutions and numbers it's printing
    aren't right.

    So the program itself is setup right, it's just the arithmatic that is
    wrong. I'm going through it step by step, and maybe I'll find the
    problem. I also posted the program up here to look at, but I have
    since changed it:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <iomanip>
    using namespace std;

    // Global Constants
    const int min_cowboys = 3;
    const int min_horses = 8;
    const int legs_cowboys = 2;
    const int legs_horses = 4;
    const int COL_WIDTH = 10;

    void Instructions();
    void Print_Possibilities(int min, int max);
    int Calculate_Possibilities(int min, int max);

    int main()
    {
    int min_legs;
    int max_legs;
    int total_poss;
    char answer;

    void Instructions();
    do
    {
    cout << "Please enter the lowest number in the range: ";
    cin >> min_legs;
    cout << "Next, enter the highest number in the range: ";
    cin >> max_legs;

    if (min_legs < (min_horses * legs_horses))
    {
    cout << "You have entered an invalid range!"<<endl;
    } else
    {
    total_poss = Calculate_Possibilities(min_legs, max_legs);


    cout << "There are a total of "<<total_poss<<" ways to
    group this"<<endl;
    cout << "many legs."<<endl;
    cout << "Would you like to see the possibilities? ";
    cin >> answer;
    if ((answer == 'y') || (answer == 'Y'))
    {
    cout <<setw(COL_WIDTH)<<"Cowboys";
    cout <<setw(COL_WIDTH)<<"Horses"<<endl;
    Print_Possibilities(min_legs, max_legs);
    cout <<endl;

    }
    else
    cout <<endl;
    }
    cout << "Would you like to try again? ";
    cin >> answer;
    } while ((answer == 'y') || (answer == 'Y'));
    return(0);
    }

    int Calculate_Possibilities(int min, int max)
    {
    int index;
    int legs;
    int possibilities;

    for (legs = min; legs < max; legs++)
    {
    for (index = min_cowboys; index < legs; index++)
    {
    if ((index * legs_cowboys * min_cowboys) < legs)
    {
    if ((legs - index * legs_cowboys * min_cowboys) %
    (min_horses * legs_horses) == 0)
    {
    possibilities++;
    }
    }
    }
    }
    return(index);
    }

    void Print_Possibilities(int min, int max)
    {
    int index;
    int legs;

    for (legs = min; legs < max; legs++)
    {
    for (index = min_cowboys; index < legs; index ++)
    {
    if ((index * legs_cowboys * min_cowboys) < legs)
    {
    if ((legs - index * legs_cowboys * min_cowboys) %
    (min_horses * legs_horses) == 0)
    {
    cout <<setw(COL_WIDTH)<<index * 3;
    cout <<setw(COL_WIDTH)<<endl;
    }
    }
    }
    }
    return;
    }

    void Instructions()
    {
    cout << "This program will look at a given range of numbers and
    determine"<<endl;
    cout << "the total number of possible leg combinations, given that
    all"<<endl;
    cout << "cowboys have 2 legs and all horses have 4 legs. It is
    also given"<<endl;
    cout << "that there are no less than 3 cowboys and no less than 8
    horses in"<<endl;
    cout << "the corral at any time. Because both cowboys and horses,
    in general"<<endl;
    cout << "have an even number of legs, no odd numbers will be
    considered."<<endl;
    return;
    }

    The calculation portion is a suggestion from a good friend of mine.

    roy

    Duane Hebert wrote:
    > "Kevin Handy" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Petrakid wrote:
    > > What is the "chinese remainder theorem"?

    > http://www.cut-the-knot.org/blue/chinese.shtml
    > oddly enough...
    >
    > >
    > > You should then target the e-mail at 'yo', whoever he is.

    >
    > can't argue with that.
    >
    > > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
    > > News==----
    > > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
    > > Newsgroups
    > > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
    > > =----
    Petrakid, Oct 12, 2006
    #13
  14. Petrakid

    Earl Purple Guest

    Petrakid wrote:
    > // Global Constants
    > const int min_cowboys = 3;
    > const int min_horses = 8;
    > const int legs_cowboys = 2;
    > const int legs_horses = 4;
    > const int COL_WIDTH = 10;


    Where did cowboys and horses come in (what no indians?) I thought we
    were dealing with pigs and chickens.

    Anyway, if we had groups of 32 and groups of 6, the first ambiguous
    number would be 96. The highest even number that can't appear is 58.
    Earl Purple, Oct 12, 2006
    #14
  15. Petrakid

    Petrakid Guest

    Look, the person counting can't tell the difference between cowboys,
    chickens, horses OR pigs. Do ya think it matters to them whether the
    program prints out as cowboys or chickens? Obviously they aren't too
    connected to reality anyway. :-D


    Earl Purple wrote:
    > Petrakid wrote:
    > > // Global Constants
    > > const int min_cowboys = 3;
    > > const int min_horses = 8;
    > > const int legs_cowboys = 2;
    > > const int legs_horses = 4;
    > > const int COL_WIDTH = 10;

    >
    > Where did cowboys and horses come in (what no indians?) I thought we
    > were dealing with pigs and chickens.
    >
    > Anyway, if we had groups of 32 and groups of 6, the first ambiguous
    > number would be 96. The highest even number that can't appear is 58.
    Petrakid, Oct 12, 2006
    #15
  16. Petrakid

    osmium Guest

    "Petrakid" wrote:

    > It wasn't me who asked that - I know what the theorem is - i just can't
    > use it...directly...in the program.
    >
    > I got the program printing out numbers now, and printing out the total
    > of possible solutions, but the solutions and numbers it's printing
    > aren't right.
    >
    > So the program itself is setup right, it's just the arithmatic that is
    > wrong. I'm going through it step by step, and maybe I'll find the
    > problem. I also posted the program up here to look at, but I have
    > since changed it:


    I find your posting technique confusing. You now have two threads and two
    sets of names (cowboys and pigs) for one problem. Then you post code for
    people to "look at" but it is not your current code. Or is it the *problem*
    you have changed, rather than the code?

    Nevertheless, I will point out one fragment of this code that I find
    interesting.

    <snip>

    > int Calculate_Possibilities(int min, int max)
    > {
    > int index;
    > int legs;
    > int possibilities;
    >
    > for (legs = min; legs < max; legs++)
    > {
    > for (index = min_cowboys; index < legs; index++)
    > {
    > if ((index * legs_cowboys * min_cowboys) < legs)
    > {
    > if ((legs - index * legs_cowboys * min_cowboys) %
    > (min_horses * legs_horses) == 0)
    > {
    > possibilities++;


    How can it make sense to add something to possibilities? Since you didn't
    initialize it, it contains garbage.

    You also say in the rules that you will ignore odd numbers. Perhaps it is
    there but I didn't see the code to back up that assertion.
    osmium, Oct 12, 2006
    #16
  17. Petrakid

    BobR Guest

    Earl Purple wrote in message
    <>...
    >
    >Petrakid wrote:
    >> // Global Constants
    >> const int min_cowboys = 3;
    >> const int min_horses = 8;
    >> const int legs_cowboys = 2;
    >> const int legs_horses = 4;
    >> const int COL_WIDTH = 10;

    >
    >Where did cowboys and horses come in (what no indians?) I thought we
    >were dealing with pigs and chickens.


    Sold the farm for a ranch!
    If the three cowboys were on the horses (something ONLY the indians and Matt
    Dillon could determine. [1]), then there would only be (min) 32 legs to
    consider ( don't count the cowboy legs when they are on horses).

    The cowboys ate the chickens and smoked the hams (oooou, the colors! the
    colors!).

    Huh?!?

    To OP:
    You did work all this out with pencil-n-paper before you started your code,
    right??
    It's SOP.

    [1] - ref. Hollywood western movies.
    --
    Bob <G> R
    POVrookie
    BobR, Oct 14, 2006
    #17
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